For VIOLINLAND: Ossy Renardy, violinist

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Lance
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For VIOLINLAND: Ossy Renardy, violinist

Post by Lance » Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:17 pm

Hello Cheniston:

I'm just preparing a radio broadcast and tribute to OSSY RENARDY (Oskar Reiss), who died so tragically in an automobile accident in December 1953 at the age of only 33.

Is there anything "unique" about this violinist you might tell me so I may report it in my biographical sketch of the artist?

As for records, I don't have enough, but some, as shown:
  • Testament 1292: 2 Bach violin sonatas, and works by Paganini (including Le Streghe), Caprices 17 and 24; a group of Kreisler pieces, and the Schubert/Wilhelmj Ave Maria, all w/Ernest Lush, pf (except the Bach).
  • Biddulph LAB 061-62: The Victor Recordings (1940-41) which includes Paganini's 24 Caprices w/piano, short pieces by Paganini, ernst, Mozart, Brahms, Dvorak, and Zarzycki and the Saint-Saens Violin Concerto #1, all with Walter Robert , pf.
  • Dutton 5024, which includes the Brahms Violin Concerto with Munch conducting, which also appears on Lys 478, but Dutton does an splendid transfer.
Oddly, I have nothing on LP unless I never catalogued it. I would LOVE to find a copy of the Remington LP wherein he recorded the Franck and Ravel violin sonatas with Eugene List, the latter whom I knew personally and even had the pleasure of preparing his piano for performance, so this collaboration would be special to me. Too bad so many of the Remington LPs never made it to compact disc. There were many by Albert Spalding (some of which I have), but I wonder who has the master tapes. This would be a great project for Appian Recordings in England!
Last edited by Lance on Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
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Werner
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Post by Werner » Fri Apr 15, 2005 11:02 pm

Lance: I just checked my catalog and find that Remington LP. Haven't looked for it yet physically, but I assume it should be here - I generally don't lose of misplace that sort of thing.

Another odd recollection: on my 21st birthday I took part in a recital with a soprano in Paterson, NJ, in which I played the Brahms G Minor Rhapsody, amon other things. Three days later I was off to join the Army at Fort Dix. During my brief stay there, I met Ross Parmenter, who before and following his Army service was writing criticism for the New York Times (he retired as Music Editor in 1964).

And during that short stay at Ft. Dix, they put on a concert in which Ossy Renardy played - don't ask me what - and I played the Brahms Rhapsody. And Ross was at the concert - but didn't have to review it.
Werner Isler

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Post by Lance » Fri Apr 15, 2005 11:18 pm

Werner wrote:Lance: I just checked my catalog and find that Remington LP. Haven't looked for it yet physically, but I assume it should be here - I generally don't lose of misplace that sort of thing.

Another odd recollection: on my 21st birthday I took part in a recital with a soprano in Paterson, NJ, in which I played the Brahms G Minor Rhapsody, amon other things. Three days later I was off to join the Army at Fort Dix. During my brief stay there, I met Ross Parmenter, who before and following his Army service was writing criticism for the New York Times (he retired as Music Editor in 1964).

And during that short stay at Ft. Dix, they put on a concert in which Ossy Renardy played - don't ask me what - and I played the Brahms Rhapsody. And Ross was at the concert - but didn't have to review it.
Werner ... what great memory recall! If you have that Remington LP, I may ask you, if you didn't mind, to have Joe Patrych make as good a copy of it as possible for me on a CD! When you find it, I'd also like to know the catalogue number of the LP. What a great item that would make in a tribute to either Renardy or Eugene List.

And Ross Parmenter ... Donald has mentioned him a number of times, and of course, his work is well known. Too bad he didn't review the concert at Fort Dix! You might just be surprised at what a good review he would have you on your Brahms! Was it the G minor you played?

You may not recall what Renardy played, but do you recall anything striking about him or his musicianship?

Appreciate your sharing the information.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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violinland
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RENARDY 1

Post by violinland » Sat Apr 16, 2005 11:57 am

RENARDY, OSSY
b. Vienna, April 26, 1920. d. Santa Fe, December 3, 1953.


Ossy Renardy was considered in the early 1940s as one of the best violinists of his generation. His real name was Oskar Reiss and he was first known as a child prodigy, mostly self taught. He studied with only one teacher, Theodore Pashkus.

At the age of 13, he gave his first public concert. In 1934, Victor Sabata invited him to perform with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. But in 1938 due to the Anschluss, he emigrated to the United States, where he made his début at the New York Town Hall. The following year, he was extraordinarily successful at Carnegie Hall, performing in the programme’s second half all of Paganini’s 24 Caprices which he was the first to record that year for Victor Co, (in a version with piano). During the war he enlisted with the US Army and gave nearly 500 concerts for the troops. He became an American citizen in 1943. On December 3, 1953 Ossy Renardy died in a car accident on his way to Santa Fe (New Mexico). His violin was a Guarnerius del Gesú, the “Carrodus” of 1742. (This entry does not mention the copy of Il Cannnone)



Your Violin Editors note:-

Most of the references to Renardy say the he played on Paganini’s Cannon. This is erroneous he played on the Vuillaumme copy of “ Il Cannone.” There is a suggestion that he used the Paganini Il Cannone to record the 24 caprices but there is no evidence that I have seen to prove this. It was I am sure the Vuillaumme copy. Renardy’s name does not appear on the official list of violinists who have played on Paganini’s violin.

Cannon (1835 circa) by Vuillaume, JB (Violin)
1 Renardy,Ossy Lush, Ernest
1) Paganini: Le Streghe op 8 arr Wilhelmj
Decca K 2355 1950
-
Contributed by (F). F= Cheniston K Roland

This violin was the copy of the del Gesù Cannon made for Paganini by J B Vuillaumme of Paris who had in 1834 taken the Guarnerius del Gesù Cannon to repair it, an ideal time to take accurate measurements to make a copy.

This is taken from my web site in Germany about who played what on which recording


RENARDY live fragments

Sarasate Zigeunerwisen AT Orchestra(fragment)New York (Ven) 1943

Wieniawsky VC D mol No 2 part of last move fragment (Ven) 00/02/41

These files are in indifference sound but are to my knowledge the only serving live performances and are historically historic. They are at you disposal if you want to include them in your Renardy special.
Sadly I did not find anything other than record reviews in my cuttings file. I would welcome a copy of the text if that is possible. There was also Masters of the Bow LP of Renardy.

I never thought that one day I would find some one with the very rare Remington of the Franck and Ravel violin sonatas. I have been after this for years but it has always eluded me. Werner is King with that LP in his collection. Sadly the Remingtons are and always have been thin on the ground in the UK I have the alleged Hubermans and some of the Spaldings.

I hope there is something here for you to add to your script.

CHENISTON K ROLAND O.L.
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violinland
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RENARDY 2

Post by violinland » Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:01 pm

Ossy Renardy

Ossy Renardy, one of the most outstanding violinists ever to hold a bow, was born in Vienna on April 26th 1920 as Oskar Reiss . .. the Italianized name, Ossi Renardi was adopt¬ed in 1934.

Renardy began violin lessons at the age of five under the guidance of a neighbourhood friend of the family. Oddly, this was the only musical education the youngster received, and the talent that was to stun the violin world some years later was earned by "1racticing his. instrument five or six hours daily.

Having completed all the musical study he was ever to have, Ossy Renardy embarked upon a concert career beginning with his Viennese debut: aged thirteen. His major tri¬umph at that time took place on October 27th 1933 when he made his Italian debut at Merano at a variety concert. His dazzling playing prompted the artistic director to con¬tract him to a further ten concerts -all enthusiastically received. The initial event at the Merano Casino caused a sensation. He played the Paganini D Major concerto and the A major sonata of Schubert to an unbelieving audience. It was at this time that he assum¬ed the name that was to become famous. The extended concerts proved to be phenomenal successes and concert promoters competed with one another to sign him to a contract. Following a return engagement at t he Vienna Konzerthaus in May 1934 he performed in Milan with the renowned Victor de Sabata. This was followed by his first tour of the Bal¬tic countries which, in turn, was followed by a highly successful tour, five months later, of Norway. Denmark, Sweden, Holland, Austria, France and Italy. From this point onward his extraordinary talents soared his fame throughout Europe.

While in Italy, the wife of an American concert manager heard him play over RAI and suggested that her husband contact Renardy. This resulted in Renardy coming to the United States for a tour of the mid-western part of the country in 1937. He was heralded every¬where as a remarkable new violin star. His Town Hall debut was on January 8th 1938 which culminated in widespread acclaim. .. even European newspapers reacted. The famous Car¬negie Hall debut on October 10th 1939 is now legendary. Planned for the forthcoming Paganini Centenary, the second half of the program consisted of the entire 24 caprices... having already played the E minor concerto of Nardini, the G major sonatina, Op. 100 of Dvorak and Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole during the first half. This stunning violinistic feat created con¬siderable attention and all violinists present, which must have included all within commuting distance, were unanimous in their praise for the exciting young virtuoso. Some years later, when questioned, Renardy said that he wouldn't go through such an endurance test again.

In 1940 he recorded the 24 caprices for RCA Victor (presented as they now appear in this historical reissue) - his first recordings. Ironically, the 24 caprices turned out to be his last recordings also, for he was killed shortly after re -recording them for the Remington company in 1953. In 1941 he enlisted in the army and made many USO appearances. Two years later he became a V.S. citizen and by 1945 had played more than 490 concerts at various service camps and installations. He appeared in public concerts once more in 1947 having prepared himself for concert activity for two years after the close of World War II.
In 1948 he was busily engaged with recitals and orchestral appearances which led him to Is¬rael, Europe again and another North American tour, including Canada - all noteworthy suc¬cesses. In 1949 he married the former Suzette Guttwirth whom he met in Europe some thir¬teen years earlier.


Among the greatest Renardy admirers was the noted conductor Charles Munch who said of him" ... there is only one word to describe him: perfection. He has everything ¬style, technique and tone, combined in the most splendid manner." His clarity of execu¬tion was marvellous... a sort of neatness that was nothing short of amazing even in the most demanding passages. A somewhat similar "string articulation" was also to be found in the playing of Erica Morini and Andre Pascal. Ossy Renardy's instrument was the famous Guarnieri del Gesu violin known as the Cannon Joseph which once belonged to Paganini.

The young violinist died tragically in an automobile accident on December 3rd 1953 near Santa Fe, New i\lexico, some 27 miles south of the Colorado border, enroute to Monte Vista for a concert on that evening. His accompanist of many years, WaIter Robert, who was driving the car, survived the crash as did the Cannon Joseph violin.

It is hoped that this first volume of Ossy Renardy will restore some of the magic that he left with us, via the phonograph, at a time when the world was at war. No violinist sounds remotely like Ossy Renardy today... or perhaps really ever did.

James Creighton


Editors note who could imagin Paganini's violin being in a private car?

CHENISTON K ROLAND O.L.
(Violin Historian)
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Author, Broadcaster, Lecturer and Editor of the Violin Times
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Lance
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Post by Lance » Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:19 pm

Incredible. This is much more than I ever expected to see. Thank you, Cheniston! Indeed, some of this information will be lent to my program. We really DO appreciate your knowledge and experience with so much that has to do with one of the "kings" of instruments - the violin (the other being the piano - at least for me!) :lol: Thank you again for all your input here. It's much appreciated.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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violinland
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It's that violin again

Post by violinland » Mon Apr 18, 2005 7:12 pm

I hope this is not too late

How about either a transcript of the programme or a tape. I would be delighted to hear it . Bye the way are you relaid on the internet yet?

I will soon have a CD out of my Janiewicz lecture.

In-The-Mean-Time I found this for you


In 1833, while in Paris, Paganini was forced to be separated for some time from his favorite violin, the Guarneri del Gesù, known as the "Cannone" since a delicate repair to the sounding board was necessary.
The precious instrument was entrusted to Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume (1798-1875), a skillful violinmaker and friend of Paganini.
Vuillaume not only repaired the "Cannone" perfectly, but he also made such a beautiful copy of it that an enthusiastic Paganini offered to buy it.
Vuillaume gave the copy to the great violinist as a gift and symbol of his great affection for Paganini.
Seven years later, in 1840, Paganini's friend and lawyer, Luigi Guglielmo Germi proposed that the great virtuoso sell the "Vuillaume" to his pupil Camillo Sivori (1815 - 1894).
Paganini agreed and told Germi to send 500 Francs earned from the sale to Vuillaume himself, declaring that he was sure the violinmaker would understand his desire to please a friend and an artist.
Among the various precious instruments he owned - an Amati, a Stradivarius and a Bergonzi - Sivori preferred the "Vuillaume" and brought it everywhere with him in his long artistic travels.
The fact that he had received the violin from Paganini was an understandable motive for the special attachment he felt and further indication of their artistic ties.
Shortly after Sivori's death in 1894, his heirs donated the violin to the City of Genoa. Since that time it has been kept at Palazzo Tursi together with Paganini's violin.
Unlike the "Cannone", the "Vuillaume" was left practically unused until the City, thanks to the sponsorship of Ansaldo S.p.A. in 1992, entrusted it to the violinmaker Renato Scrollavezza for restoration.
As a result, the "Sivori" violin has been returned to contemporary concert activity.

CHENISTON K ROLAND O.L.
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Author, Broadcaster, Lecturer and Editor of the Violin Times
Member of the Liverpool Medical Institution
VIOLIN EDITOR CMG

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Post by Sporkadelic » Tue Apr 19, 2005 9:28 pm

The Sony Masterworks Heritage CD devoted to Michael Rabin is filled out with some recordings Renardy did for Columbia.

I have heard that the Remington master tapes do exist, but for some years they have not been available for reissue due to an unpaid tax liability.

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