Have your tastes in classical music changed over the years?

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IcedNote
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Have your tastes in classical music changed over the years?

Post by IcedNote » Mon Aug 20, 2007 7:43 pm

I'm only 26, so I don't know if my experience will be shared with you*cough* older *cough* forumites :lol:, but I still listen most to the same music that I started with: Romantic music.

Over the years, have your tastes shifted significantly? I mean...did you start with Baroque and end up loving Stockhausen or something?

I know that you've certainly acquired a lot more music, your tastes have expanded, etc. But have they CHANGED? Do you love something more now than what you did at the beginning?

Does that make sense? :D

-G
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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by Fluter » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:13 pm

IcedNote wrote:I'm only 26, so I don't know if my experience will be shared with you*cough* older *cough* forumites :lol:, but I still listen most to the same music that I started with: Romantic music.

Over the years, have your tastes shifted significantly? I mean...did you start with Baroque and end up loving Stockhausen or something?

I know that you've certainly acquired a lot more music, your tastes have expanded, etc. But have they CHANGED? Do you love something more now than what you did at the beginning?

Does that make sense? :D

-G
No, they shouldn't. Unless you are one of those guys that are easily swayed. Or in other words, guys who don't rely on principles and are subject to relativism. John Cage was one of them.

The very fact that you picked up Romantic music first means something, not because it's the most listened to today, but because you also was interested in that kind of thing. Each period has different doctrines and philosophies with their music, if you are totally inclined to one of them that means that you agree with them. Just like political parties.

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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:18 pm

I was 26 the year you were born, but I don't think you have to apologize for asking an interesting, maybe even important question. Contrary to what may be going on elsewhere on the site, we are here to talk about music and musical taste.

It is actually a far more difficult question than many might imagine. I'm certainly not going to tell you that I have stopped loving Beethoven and started loving Delius. There's something called musical maturity and at some point we get there and after that it is all a matter of fine tuning. My tendency has been to develop more depth where I already had interest. Very great composers did not just write a handful of compositions, and it can take a lifetime of study just to seriously listen to everything important that they wrote (and I still have gaps). I make tangential discoveries as well (in spite of my reputation here as thinking only within a box), but I would not claim that they ever blossom in a new direction at my age.

That's me, but you asked for opinions. I don't expect other posters to say the same thing; I would not necessarily want them to.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Barry » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:44 pm

The short answer is no. I still favor the same genres and periods today that I have virtually since I became a fan of classical music; orchestral and Beethoven through the early 20th century.

But while I wouldn't say my taste has changed, it's broadened. I like a number of composers today whose music I didn't take to during those earlier years of listening to classical; including Shostakovich, who is the first totally 20th century composer that has become a big favorite for me.
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:01 pm

Definately. I couldn't listen to opera, chant or lieder when I first "converted" from rock/pop. I tend to think more in terms of chamber, orchestral, opera etc than baroque, classical, romantic (with EM being its own thing).

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Post by some guy » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:20 pm

And I guess that my short answer would be "yes." Not entirely sure that that's the right answer, though. It seems to be a trick question. Certainly the esteemed members that have already replied have made not changing into a virtue. Or so I read it.

I didn't discover "classical" music until quite late. Eight or nine. Before that, the only thing in the house was whatever was on t.v. and a dab of Percy Faith and Ray Coniff, stuff like that. When I first heard Haydn and Grieg and Rachmaninoff and the like, I thought "So this is what music is supposed to sound like." That is, I responded to the greater complexity, to the development, to the modulation--characteristics more frequently found in "classical" music than anywhere else.

I discovered twentieth century quite late, too. Twenty. Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra was what started it. There it was clearly the irregularities of rhythm and melody and the closer harmonies that I was responding to. As I listened to this new and exciting world, more Bartók, Stravinsky, Carter in quick succession, then Stockhausen and other Germanic electronic music, Ives and Cage and Mumma and Lucier and Ashley, Lutoslawski, Penderecki (pre-second symphony only), Pousseur, Ferrari.

Among others.

I suppose I was more and more drawn to sound at this point. Sound for its own sake. But I never stopped adding things from earlier music--Bruckner, Berlioz, Gluck, Monteverdi, Dowland, Mahler, Purcell, Prokofiev--so themes and development and modulation were still attractive to me. Less so, though, than the unstable, asymmetric, unpredictable, complex noises of experimental and electroacoustic music--the complexity that had initially attracted me to Haydn (over Lawrence Welk) was now a matter more of the sounds themselves, vertical, than a matter of horizontal lines weaving in and out in a sonata-allegro, say, or a passacaglia.

I listen to music before say 1945 less and less as I get older, but there's very little that I liked as a child that I don't still like. And much that I didn't like that I now do like, most notably vocal music, especially opera. Not that my likes and dislikes are all that important or interesting. I always felt it was the music judging me rather than me judging the music. And that my proper relation to it was compounded equally of humility and curiosity.

Apparently my long answer is "no," but a "no" as qualified and as compromised as my "yes" was!
Last edited by some guy on Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:29 pm

Brendan wrote:Definately. I couldn't listen to opera, chant or lieder when I first "converted" from rock/pop. I tend to think more in terms of chamber, orchestral, opera etc than baroque, classical, romantic (with EM being its own thing).
You know, this is not intended as a reproach to Brendan. We've gone our nine miles but I have no desire to bait him. But what he says is most interesting. He is not the only one here who confesses a space in life where his main "musical" interest was pop/rock. Speaking only for myself, this is almost an alien concept. I was never interested in that kind of, um I guess I have to call it music for want of a better word. I didn't exactly have a friendless childhood, but I might have had if only for that reason. I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan, and when they sang "I Wanna Hold Your Hand." all I could think of at the age of nine was "This is it? You gotta be kidding." Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along.

(In case anyone is interested, nobody in the live audience of that classic broadcast heard a word or note of what they were singing. The screaming from the mostly female fans was far too loud, and it was only clever miking that enabled it to be broadcast.)

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Post by Donald Isler » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:48 pm

JBuck wrote:

"I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan...................Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along."


I actually told one schoolmate I didn't like them. He wanted to fight.
Donald Isler

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:45 pm

Too young for the Beatles, I recall hearing alll sorts of prog rock, ballads and disco until one day I heard the Sex Pistols play God Save the Queen. But I was into very obscure things like German industrial noise (Einsturzende Neubauten etc) rather than true pop, so was always seeking music outside the mainstream of my peer group.

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Post by Chalkperson » Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:15 pm

Brendan wrote: But I was into very obscure things like German industrial noise (Einsturzende Neubauten etc) rather than true pop, so was always seeking music outside the mainstream of my peer group.
I will respond to icednote's question tomorrow, but, i'm sure many of the posters here will agree with me that Einsturzende Neubauten was hardly very obscure...everyone listening to the unrhythmic sound of hammers and other blunt instruments hitting steel knew exactly who they were...

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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:22 am

If I ask around the office or local pub if anyone has heard of Einsturzende Neubauten or SPK I get blank looks, where most have heard of Rammstein etc. Perhaps they were less obscure in your part of the world.

EN became far more popular/recognized during the nineties. I was really referring to their early stuff back when I was in school or just departed - and I can recall being the only person in Australia I could find with an EN LP. I might not have been the only one, but I couldn't find anyone else in 1982 with a copy of Kollaps I brought back from Europe.

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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:01 am

Donald Isler wrote:JBuck wrote:

"I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan...................Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along."


I actually told one schoolmate I didn't like them. He wanted to fight.
For me, that "pop" stuff was just an irritant. I had my piano and my record collection---and, curiously, all my male friends liked "classical" music as well.....but the girls didn't!

Jack
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Post by Holden Fourth » Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:21 am

I started off as a lover of Beethoven piano works, graduated to his symphonies, Chopin, Schumann and all the other well known classical and romantic composers but it was either large scale or solo instrument.

Now I am getting deeper and deeper into chamber works and the orchestral compositions of the more modern composers.

Try as hard as I can, I just can't get into full operas. I love some of the great arias and choruses but a complete opera? I've never got past Carmen.

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Post by Sapphire » Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:23 am

In agreement with others above, I observe that for most people their tastes in classical music broaden with age and experience. Many newbies typically start out loving the likes of Beethoven or Mozart but finish up loving a whole lot more. I would suggest that there is also a tendency to prefer smaller scale works as one matures. On this basis, it could be said that for most people their tastes do change insofar that they enjoy a much wider range of classical music. In my case, I have tended to remain mainly in the "classical" and romantic repertoire but I enjoy a much wider range of material and composers than I did when I first started.


Saphire

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:32 am

Brendan wrote:If I ask around the office or local pub if anyone has heard of Einsturzende Neubauten or SPK I get blank looks, where most have heard of Rammstein etc. Perhaps they were less obscure in your part of the world.
Gratuitous confession time here. The only one of these things I have ever heard of is Ramstein, a city in Germany that has a US Air Force Base. I don't even know what Einsturzende Neubauten means ("newly built wonders,' maybe? Perhaps Donald will get on the phone to his dad again).

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by PJME » Tue Aug 21, 2007 3:12 am

Einsturzende Neubauten : Collapsing new buildings. I wonder if the group still exists!?

Yes!....See their official website : http://www.neubauten.org/en-home.html

My taste in music did change. Some music will never be " a favorite" (Wagner, Bruckner, Donizetti, Feldman,Stockhausen, Delius, Liszt,...some ( very complicated) renaissance polyphony/masses ...)
But the discovery of it all is humbling (I do not read music =I know nothing...) and still helps me to learn.

I never had a feeling for pop/rock. Silly melodies, endlessly repeated. An "unpleasant "electronic soup". instruments with no individual character. No tension....

Peter

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Post by absinthe » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:05 am

I've mellowed a lot. When I first got interested in composition, everything was measured so-many degrees Alban Berg or Bob Graettinger (of City of Glass fame). I've sinced moved onto a more mellow repertoire stretching back as far as Debussy. There have been Beethoven and Mozart moments.

Broadminded, really. I'll listen to most music including pop apart from the standard chart default where it seems to have stuck for the last 15 years and which is just a little too conservative.

absinthe

Edit: Adding my delight in Renaissance music which has been fairly constant over the years.
Last edited by absinthe on Tue Aug 21, 2007 6:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Sapphire » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:36 am

absinthe wrote:I've mellowed a lot. .... I've sinced moved onto a more mellow repertoire stretching back as far as Debussy. There have been Beethoven and Mozart moments.
Opportunity for further mellowing perhaps? What about the equally good bits in the middle: Schubert, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Liszt, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky?


Saphire

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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:57 am

Recently, I've taking on the symphonies of Humphrey Searle. Do you know them? 12-tone---but very lyrical and individual.

A British composer of atonal music is not very common (or am I wrong?).

Jack
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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by hangos » Tue Aug 21, 2007 5:25 am

IcedNote wrote:
Over the years, have your tastes shifted significantly? I mean...did you start with Baroque and end up loving Stockhausen or something?

I know that you've certainly acquired a lot more music, your tastes have expanded, etc. But have they CHANGED? Do you love something more now than what you did at the beginning?

Does that make sense? :D

-G
It certainly does make sense! It is part of the human condition to search for new things in every sphere of life, and music is no exception.One thing we must bear in mind is how subjective our own tastes are.For instance, the poster who never felt any tension in rock music has probably only heard heavy metal which often plays at one sound level only (11/10) rather than Hendrix, who was a master of loud and soft,light and shade....
As for me, I started off with Wagner and Beethoven overtures,then quickly onto Bartok's MUSPAC ( :o ), Tchaikovsky,Sibelius, Mahler, Bruckner,Wagner's Ring,Tristan,Bartok's SQs.Not much variety there then! The big sound was paramount.In the last 10 years I've gravitated much more to chamber music,especially Bartok,Shostakovich,beethoven, as well as what I call the pursuit of new sounds from Lutoslawski and Ligeti, whose music for me at any rate is highly dependent on a good recording to make it work completely.Who knows what will be next - perhaps Elliott Carter or Pierre Boulez? And like several others on this forum, I can't read a note of music,I'm ashamed to say, so the music I enjoy makes some kind of sense emotionally and "logically" to me.
In a nutshell, my tastes have chnged in that I don't listen to my "first loves" anything like as often as I do to my later discoveries, but when I do listen to them I still get a buzz! :D

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 5:34 am

PJME wrote:Einsturzende Neubauten : Collapsing new buildings. I wonder if the group still exists!?

Yes!....See their official website : http://www.neubauten.org/en-home.html

My taste in music did change. Some music will never be " a favorite" (Wagner, Bruckner, Donizetti, Feldman,Stockhausen, Delius, Liszt,...some ( very complicated) renaissance polyphony/masses ...)
But the discovery of it all is humbling (I do not read music =I know nothing...) and still helps me to learn.

I never had a feeling for pop/rock. Silly melodies, endlessly repeated. An "unpleasant "electronic soup". instruments with no individual character. No tension....

Peter
I will never live this down, but at least I got the "new building" part of it right. Thanks, Peter, and now, I am NOT going to ask who Feldman is, since if he's on your don't bother list he would surely be on mine too. :) And while Wagner finally won the day I came to him very late.

There are several people here, including myself,who enjoy (forgive me for the nationalistic phrase, but it is common) the Great American Songbook but put a stop on their interest in popular music when pop/rock became the norm. But it's never quite a simple story. A couple of years ago Paul McCartney turned 64, reminding us that his famous ditty about that is a little gem that could have been written by Cole Porter. I don't know if you had access to this in Belgium or not, but for years there was a feature on classical radio here hosted by two great classical DJs, Robert Aubrey Davis and Martin Goldsmith, called "Songs for Aging Children." I was not a regular listener, but if it was ever possible to make a plausible case for popular music when someone is only really interested in classical....

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by BC » Tue Aug 21, 2007 6:05 am

I've started listening to classical music again after years of mainly listening to other genres (jazz, hip hop, electronica). In the past my classical preferences were fairly middle of the road, although I was less interested in the period between Beethoven and Wagner than in what came before and after. Nowadays I'm strongly focussed on the twentieth century, although I've also been dabbling in some Montverdi and Purcell. I'm much less interested in the Bach/Mozart/Beethoven mainstream than I was.

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 6:14 am

BC wrote:I've started listening to classical music again after years of mainly listening to other genres (jazz, hip hop, electronica). In the past my classical preferences were fairly middle of the road, although I was less interested in the period between Beethoven and Wagner than in what came before and after. Nowadays I'm strongly focussed on the twentieth century, although I've also been dabbling in some Montverdi and Purcell. I'm much less interested in the Bach/Mozart/Beethoven mainstream than I was.
Well, I hope you keep up your interest, but Beethoven died in 1827, Wagner in 1883. It is all too brief a time, do you not think, to put a limit on one's interests no matter what treasures were squeezed between those bounds.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Teresa B » Tue Aug 21, 2007 7:05 am

Donald Isler wrote:JBuck wrote:

"I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan...................Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along."


I actually told one schoolmate I didn't like them. He wanted to fight.
Ah the days of innocent youth...I made the same mistake at age 12, telling a girl "friend" I was not a fan of "The Monkees". Her reply (which interestingly I still remember)? "You're stupid."

I did actually like some rock/pop as a callow young thing, but I also loved classical composers. I would say my taste has broadened to include more chamber music.

Teresa
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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 7:39 am

Teresa B wrote:
Donald Isler wrote:JBuck wrote:

"I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan...................Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along."


I actually told one schoolmate I didn't like them. He wanted to fight.
Ah the days of innocent youth...I made the same mistake at age 12, telling a girl "friend" I was not a fan of "The Monkees". Her reply (which interestingly I still remember)? "You're stupid."

I did actually like some rock/pop as a callow young thing, but I also loved classical composers. I would say my taste has broadened to include more chamber music.

Teresa
It is good that this topic came up, because while we share an interest here, we almost never open up that level of commisseration, which, speaking ony for myself, would still be such a matter of pain if I like all of you were not so grown up. The shock, the sheer shock of being told by a schoolmate that there was something wrong with you because you didn't care for the latest craze in pop music... Well, I don't have to go on, do I, Teresa? Aside from the aspect of wishing to be respected for what you yourself are, there is the horror of realizing that there is only the herd, and you are the outling.

Now I meet high school classmates--very occasionally--and all of that is long behind us. All normal people grow up to realize that people are the only thing that is important, but when you are a child, to be different and at the same time sensitive is not always such a pleasant thing.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:24 am

Great thread!

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by diegobueno » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:38 am

My tastes in music are always evolving, and in some ways staying the same. I listen to early music much less than I used to and modern music much more. Of post-1945 composers, I listen to the Avant-garde much less and the post-modern much more. These are just trends, mind you, not absolutes.

As always I respond best to music which is clear and logically structured. I have no interest in sound for its own sake.

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Post by BC » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:41 am

jbuck919 wrote:
BC wrote:I've started listening to classical music again after years of mainly listening to other genres (jazz, hip hop, electronica). In the past my classical preferences were fairly middle of the road, although I was less interested in the period between Beethoven and Wagner than in what came before and after. Nowadays I'm strongly focussed on the twentieth century, although I've also been dabbling in some Montverdi and Purcell. I'm much less interested in the Bach/Mozart/Beethoven mainstream than I was.
Well, I hope you keep up your interest, but Beethoven died in 1827, Wagner in 1883. It is all too brief a time, do you not think, to put a limit on one's interests no matter what treasures were squeezed between those bounds.
I was suggesting the opposite --that I didn't much care for the composers of that period (Brahms, Mendelssohn, Schumann etc). I preferred, on the whole, composers from the period prior to that (roughly from Vivaldi to Beethoven/Schubert) and after (from Wagner). This is obviously a generalisation -- I liked Chopin for example -- nor is it intended to be historically precise-- taste is obviously more a question of style than chronology.

However, that was talking about the past -- much of the music I liked then interests me less now. I'm interested in the 20th century and possibly some early music -- I'm not hugely interested in much from mainstream classical and romantic repertoire, although there are exceptions to that -- for example I'm still pretty excited by 19th-century Italian opera.

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:41 am

diegobueno wrote: As always I respond best to music which is clear and logically structured.
Well, that explains our complete coincidence in taste. :)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by diegobueno » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:53 am

jbuck919 wrote:
diegobueno wrote: As always I respond best to music which is clear and logically structured.
Well, that explains our complete coincidence in taste. :)
Hey, I think we've got Bach Beethoven and Brahms in common. Can we add Bartók and Stravinsky to the list of shared favorites?

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Post by greymouse » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:55 am

Yes, mine have changed a bit. I was introduced to classical music in college. At first, I was most drawn to the 20th century wild stuff because I was frustrated throughout my youth at why musicians always used the same 7 notes and common meters. It was intoxicating to hear the various ways composers broke out of this. Nowadays though (about 12 years later), I really don't care about all that and I'm enjoying simple, straightforward music more.

In college, everything was supposed to be a masterpiece and all the masters were great, and it was fun to learn. Now that the new has worn off, I don't scold myself for getting bored by Haydn or Mozart. I'm not trying to learn anymore - I just want what works for me. On the other hand, I've gone through phases where I appreciate certain less academic composers: Mendelssohn, Vaughan Williams, Rachmaninov, and Grieg are a few examples.

Some things stay the same. I have always disliked Rimsky Korsakov and Strauss.

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:59 am

diegobueno wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
diegobueno wrote: As always I respond best to music which is clear and logically structured.
Well, that explains our complete coincidence in taste. :)
Hey, I think we've got Bach Beethoven and Brahms in common. Can we add Bartók and Stravinsky to the list of shared favorites?
\

Oh absolutely, and a few more I certainly hope. Just maybe not Gershwin as belonging in Carnegie Hall. :)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by diegobueno » Tue Aug 21, 2007 10:11 am

jbuck919 wrote:
Oh absolutely, and a few more I certainly hope. Just maybe not Gershwin as belonging in Carnegie Hall. :)
I sometimes worry that my range of interests is getting narrower as I get older. It's nice of you to remind me of how broad a base I actually have.

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Post by slofstra » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:46 pm

PJME wrote:Einsturzende Neubauten : Collapsing new buildings. I wonder if the group still exists!?

Yes!....See their official website : http://www.neubauten.org/en-home.html

My taste in music did change. Some music will never be " a favorite" (Wagner, Bruckner, Donizetti, Feldman,Stockhausen, Delius, Liszt,...some ( very complicated) renaissance polyphony/masses ...)
But the discovery of it all is humbling (I do not read music =I know nothing...) and still helps me to learn.

I never had a feeling for pop/rock. Silly melodies, endlessly repeated. An "unpleasant "electronic soup". instruments with no individual character. No tension....

Peter
Fans of avant garde kraut musik may also enjoy:

http://www.kraftwerk.com

http://www.amonduul.de/

http://www.tangerinedream-music.com/

Someone told me today that Mark Twain said of Wagner's music, "It's better than it sounds".

slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:59 pm

Teresa B wrote:
Donald Isler wrote:JBuck wrote:

"I still remember the Beatles' US debut on Ed Sullivan...................Then I went back to school and pretended to like it for the sake of getting along."


I actually told one schoolmate I didn't like them. He wanted to fight.
Ah the days of innocent youth...I made the same mistake at age 12, telling a girl "friend" I was not a fan of "The Monkees". Her reply (which interestingly I still remember)? "You're stupid."

I did actually like some rock/pop as a callow young thing, but I also loved classical composers. I would say my taste has broadened to include more chamber music.

Teresa
Great story. But, ah, Teresa, how could you be so stupid as to not like the Monkees!

There's an interesting story that Jimi Hendrix (also mentioned on this thread) once opened for them. The Monkees were watching from backstage and were awed by his guitar playing and worried about being upstaged. But to their surprise their own fans booed Hendrix right off the stage. From this point, apparently, the band began to view their own music, their management and their fans with growing contempt.

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 10:20 pm

diegobueno wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
Oh absolutely, and a few more I certainly hope. Just maybe not Gershwin as belonging in Carnegie Hall. :)
I sometimes worry that my range of interests is getting narrower as I get older. It's nice of you to remind me of how broad a base I actually have.
I'm completely diverting the subject here, but the local PBS station ran a series on Broadway musicals aka the Great American Songbook a couple of weeks ago. It could not be very new, because some of the people interviewed must be dead lo these ten years or more.

There were of course many clips, most of which I knew but they were still great fun. But something I didn't really remember: the 1936 version of Showboat (If Porgy is an opera, then so is Showboat). They don't do much these days with this filming, partly I imagine because Irene Dunne is so preposterous in her Stepin Fetchit routine in the ensemble continuation of "Can't Help,." something that was skipped entirely in the 1950s version. But this show did feature Helen Morgan's rendition of Julie's Ballad, which send me straight to IMDb to figure out who she was. Alas, she had a horridly tragic life, but, she is great in the way only simplicity can be great in that one moment in that one movie. This concept is generally lost today, but song writers like Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin and Cole Porter and yes, George Gershwin knew it: Just sing the damn song the way I wrote it.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by slofstra » Tue Aug 21, 2007 10:24 pm

I stopped listening to rock and pop entirely in 1980. Around 1978 I had started to collect and listen to some classical music. Handel's Messiah, Beethoven's 5th, standard repertoire. As well, I tried out a few performances of the K-W Symphony - some pops, some what they called, Masterpiece. I think the Masterpiece concerts really fomented my interest in classical music. But because I was busy with my career and raising a family, my listening had absolutely no direction. I had a number of tapes but barely paid attention to what I was listening to beyond the composer's name. (I'll still pop in a CD in the car player without much caring what it is).
Now that we're empty nesters and have moved back into the city I've decided to indulge my interest a little more actively. I'm still a very eclectic listener. I like to listen to new things, but not in a superficial way. If I buy a Berio or Norgard CD, I'll play it 5 times at least, unless I really hate it.
Also for many years I listened more to chamber and keyboard works because I didn't have a good system or place to listen to orchestral. I now have a listening room cum library where I can really indulge my passion.

My interests have gravitated more and more to 20th century composers, like Shostakovich, Vaughan Williams, Hindemith. Brahms has always been a favourite, especially his chamber music. I like some of almost everything, which is quite different from liking anything.

Until very recently I could never see the point of owning a second performance of a given composition. I made exceptions for a few things such as Mozart's Requiem, VWs Dona Nobis Pacem, and Beethoven's 9th. But my philosophy was that I'd rather buy something I had not heard before. I'm now finding it more enjoyable to acquire additional performances - especially an entire box set retrospective of familiar pieces cast in a new light by a different performer.

And lately I've gravitated back to some indie/ pop music which I indulge in vicariously through my kids. They have an astounding sensibility for good pop music. I've made a little rule for myself that I won't play any pop music in the house or in my listening room, only in the car.
Finally, I've always been a fan of bluegrass, in particular the Stanley Brothers, Alison Krauss and Nickel Creek.

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 10:52 pm

True bluegrass is another story. It is an important improvisatory folk art form that IMO is the equivalent of Jazz. The problem is that most people cannot distinguish it from country and western or other superficially similar forms that have about as much artistry as bad wallpaper.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:17 pm

slofstra wrote:
Fans of avant garde kraut musik may also enjoy:

http://www.kraftwerk.com

http://www.amonduul.de/

http://www.tangerinedream-music.com/

Someone told me today that Mark Twain said of Wagner's music, "It's better than it sounds".
Oh Boy...now look what's happened...next Henry will be recommending Faust...or even worse Gong... :shock:

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:30 pm

slofstra wrote: I like to listen to new things, but not in a superficial way. If I buy a Berio or Norgard CD, I'll play it 5 times at least, unless I really hate it.

Until very recently I could never see the point of owning a second performance of a given composition.

Finally, I've always been a fan of bluegrass, in particular the Stanley Brothers, Alison Krauss and Nickel Creek.
Phew, Henry redeemed himself, one day I will tell you the story about John Paul Jones joining Nickel Creek for a tour of Mandolin Festivals, along with my dear friend Pete Thomas on Drums, they did sixteen Bars of Trampled Underfoot, in the Bowery Ballroom...awesome...

Oh and it's a question from another thread, but I did, just one time, manage to fall asleep at Madison Square Gardens, at a Robert Plant show...in his guest box no less...

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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:20 am

Just remembered--- I haven't as yet answered the basic question here.

When I was small (4 years old) my favorites were Rachmaninoff's 2nd Piano Concerto, Strauss' "Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche" and Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf". Later I took piano lessons, learned Bach, Beethoven and Schumann (surprise!) some Mozart, Schubert, Chopin, Mendelssohn and Rubinstein.

As a teenager I loved mainly orchestral music, first Mendelssohn, Liszt and Brahms---later Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann and Bruckner. I love 'em all now....and a lot more masters, to include Spohr, Goldmark, Mahler and Alfvén.

20th century works were already in my repertoire by 19, back then they were still contemporary: Stravinsky, Hindemith, Copland, Barber, etc.

Gee---we've come such a long way....

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Post by arglebargle » Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:55 am

I'd say the main changes in 35 years of listening are learning to appreciate music both earlier and later than the classical period, and becoming better able to appreciate unfamiliar works more quickly. It used to take several hearings of anything at all challenging to appreciate and now I find I just sort of 'get' what the composer is doing more readily (at a layman's level of understanding). And I'd definitely second the point above about seeing the value in having multiple recordings of the same works.

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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Aug 22, 2007 1:03 am

arglebargle wrote:I'd say the main changes in 35 years of listening are learning to appreciate music both earlier and later than the classical period, and becoming better able to appreciate unfamiliar works more quickly. It used to take several hearings of anything at all challenging to appreciate and now I find I just sort of 'get' what the composer is doing more readily (at a layman's level of understanding). And I'd definitely second the point above about seeing the value in having multiple recordings of the same works.
Yes, indeed! Have a few select recordings of works puts a different slant on them. I remember not enjoying several major compositions because I bought (unknowingly) poor recordings.

Later on, I learned how to spot the shabby ones----and look for pianists, conductors, etc. who were expert and sensitive in their choice of works.

As I've mentioned before, not all great performing musicians are good at every composer.

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:42 am

IcedNote wrote:forumites
Good grief! It sounds like a skin condition.
Over the years, have your tastes shifted significantly? I mean...did you start with Baroque and end up loving Stockhausen or something?
I went the other way: I started with Grieg, Tchaikovsky, and Debussy. Debussy staid and I gained a deeper appreciation of him. I was pretty omnivorous but based mostly in the high Romantics until I bought Symphonies and Fanfares for the King's Supper, one of the earliest lps put out by Nonesuch (H-71009). It was the beginning of a long love affair that has taken me back in time, not forward. So yes, my tastes changed from what I liked from infancy to 18. When I was 18, my tastes settled to what my preferences are now. Do not think I don't listen to anything else, because I listen to a lot of music from all over the spectrum. But I'm happiest with the earliest.
Corlyss
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Post by Teresa B » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:22 am

slofstra wrote: Great story. But, ah, Teresa, how could you be so stupid as to not like the Monkees!

There's an interesting story that Jimi Hendrix (also mentioned on this thread) once opened for them. The Monkees were watching from backstage and were awed by his guitar playing and worried about being upstaged. But to their surprise their own fans booed Hendrix right off the stage. From this point, apparently, the band began to view their own music, their management and their fans with growing contempt.
...And thus evidence that Monkees evolved!

Teresa
"We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." ~ The Cheshire Cat

Author of the novel "Creating Will"

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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by Teresa B » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:25 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
IcedNote wrote:forumites
Good grief! It sounds like a skin condition.
:lol: I'll write it up--surely the Journal of Irreproducible Results will be interested.

Teresa
"We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." ~ The Cheshire Cat

Author of the novel "Creating Will"

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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:35 am

Teresa B wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:
IcedNote wrote:forumites
Good grief! It sounds like a skin condition.
:lol: I'll write it up--surely the Journal of Irreproducible Results will be interested.

Teresa
If we couldn't occasionally do a ROFL it wouldn't be worth coming here, would it? The only thing I can think of is "impetigo," pronounced of course "im-pet-I-go," which if you put the accent on the second syllable sounds like an artistic technique that might have been practiced by Michelangelo.

I'm sorry, but I'm still laughing. Corlyss, do go away again so you can come back and post something so silly but hilarious one more time.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by diegobueno » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:54 am

Corlyss_D wrote: until I bought Symphonies and Fanfares for the King's Supper, one of the earliest lps put out by Nonesuch (H-71009). It was the beginning of a long love affair that has taken me back in time, not forward.
Did you also have Voices of the Middle Ages, also on Nonesuch, with Konrad Ruhland and the Capella Antiqua Köln? That one always held me spellbound, even though the performances were actually kind of crude. It just seemed like music from another world. The Dufay setting of Veni Creator Spiritus is particularly beautiful.

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Post by val » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:06 am

Some of my preferences didn't change with the years: Monteverdi, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Bruckner, Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Verdi, Debussy, Schönberg and Bartok. I love their music the same way I did when I listened some of their works for the first time.

There are composers that I liked but, with time, I started to like them even more. Ancient composers such as Dufay, Byrd, Buxtehude or Schütz, or more modern ones such as Haydn, Mussorgski, Stravinsky are examples of composers who became very important in my life with the years.

Regarding others it was the contrary: I cannot feel the enthusiasm of my youth for Chopin, Mahler, Strauss, Puccini.

And there are the composers or works we discover with delight: to me it was Enescu, the operas of Rimski-Korsakov, the songs of Duparc and Wolf, the music of Webern, among others.

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Re: Have your tastes in classical music changed over the yea

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:11 am

diegobueno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote: until I bought Symphonies and Fanfares for the King's Supper, one of the earliest lps put out by Nonesuch (H-71009). It was the beginning of a long love affair that has taken me back in time, not forward.
Did you also have Voices of the Middle Ages, also on Nonesuch, with Konrad Ruhland and the Capella Antiqua Köln? That one always held me spellbound, even though the performances were actually kind of crude. It just seemed like music from another world. The Dufay setting of Veni Creator Spiritus is particularly beautiful.
Well, you weren't addressing me, but I had it once upon a time. It is music from another world, Mark, which is both part of the beauty and part of the problem.

Corlyss (and perhaps other EM fans here) does not share this thinking, and is welcome to her own taste, but polyphony did not really mature until around 1500. Perotin, Machaut, jumping ahead to Dufay have a certain charm, but they are approximately to mature polyphony what Charpentier is to the Baroque or Johann Christian Bach is to the classical period. Not awful, just not quite there yet. Once we hit Josquin, everything takes off and it becomes the most international school of great composers there ever was. Remarkable when you think about it: Victoria in Spain, Byrd in England, Lassus in The Netherlands, Isaac in Germany, Palestrina in Italy, and I 've only mentioned an obvious few. And they all had some sort of mutual awareness of the others in an age where that kind of communication was an extreme reach.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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