Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

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Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

Post by Lance » Wed Nov 14, 2007 6:03 pm

[Article of a talk given by author Agnes Selby
in Sidney, Australia for "Opera Lunedi"]


ANNA SELINA (NANCY) STORACE -
MOZART'S ENGLISH ROSE AND FIRST SUSANNA.

_____________________________________________________________

BEFORE I BEGIN, I would like to bring to your attention the title I gave this talk. It was not by accident that I called Nancy "Mozart's" first Susanna, with the emphasis on "Mozart's," for she was his first Susanna in his opera The Marriage of Figaro, but not his lover, as has been at times intimated by some Mozart writers. No evidence of such an affair has ever been found and remains in the realm of fantasy as do many other affairs Mozart stands accused of. Nancy spent four years in Vienna. She was only 17 when she arrived at the Imperial capital and during these four years she managed to marry and separate from her cruel husband, carry on love affairs with two of her colleagues and fall in love with Lord Barnard with whom she finally returned to England. It is doubtful that she ever saw Mozart in a romantic light, a married and a rather ugly little man, who would have scarcely been the object of her affections. This honour belonged to the Spanish composer, Martin y Soler whose opera Una Cosa Rara followed Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, delighting the audiences with spectacular Spanish costumes imported for the occasion by the wife of the Spanish Ambassador in Vienna. It was with Soler that Nancy had a well-known affair in Vienna.

One very attractive theory that has been repeated by a number of Mozartean writers concerns Mozart's farewell aria composed for Nancy on the eve of her departure from Vienna, the Scena and Rondo, K. 505. In his thematic catalogue, Mozart noted "Für Mslle. Storace und mich." This is a very beautiful aria but the text is from his opera Idomeneo and the "für mich" is indeed an indication that he, himself was to play the accompaniment. As such notations appear elsewhere in Mozart's thematic catalogue, the suggestion that this was a public declaration of love, and this in the presence of his wife, must be considered utter nonsense. To Nancy this aria does not seem to have meant very much, as there is no record of her ever having performed it again. Mozart did however, befriend the English clique of artists, consisting of the tenor, Michael Kelly, Mozart's pupil, Thomas Attwood and lastly Nancy's brother, Stephen, whose two operas had been performed in Vienna with great success. Attwood was the protégé of the then Prince of Wales and as Mozart had great hopes of going to London, no better English contacts could have been found than the lively company of these young English artists.

Mozart was a great admirer of Nancy's talent. The role of Susanna in The Marriage of Figaro was specially fashioned to suit her voice and Da Ponte took great pains to write the libretto to suit her personality. Some Mozart scholars would like to speculate that Nancy and Mozart had kept up a loving correspondence after she left Vienna but no letters from Mozart were found among Nancy's papers after her death. This has been explained away by the supposedly torrid nature of the letters which were allegedly burned by Nancy's 88 year old mother the very day after her death when the poor woman was reeling from the tragedy of having lost both her gifted children. Another theory that must be debunked here is that she was an English Rose as she is often referred to. The daughter of a Neapolitan father and an English mother, she had inherited her father's swarthy looks, dark hair and sparkling, large and dark eyes. She was no mere English Rose but an earth mother, with no refined sensitivities which so suited the affected mores of her time. She was a comedienne, an actress of great merit, not a beautiful woman, but one who left the impression of beauty on whomever she happened to meet. Finally, her name is spelled STORACE and the announcement of her name in our program is not an isolated instant of the misspelling of that name. Nancy's patronymic was simply Storace, rhyming with Horace, and although she referred to herself as Madame Storace, her brother was known simply as Stephen Storace. In order to simplify all this confusion, I will refer to them all as Storace.

There is but one meager biography of Nancy Storace by Geoffrey Brace. This book is not available in Australia and I would, therefore like to express my thanks to my French friend, the Parisian librarian Madame Emmanuelle Sayag-Pesque who has kindly supplied me with documents she had herself obtained during a recent visit to London and has, in fact, sent me the famous recordings of operas which we are about to hear.

Nancy was born on 27 October 1765 to Stephano Storace and Elizabeth Trussler, the second child after a son, Stephen born on April 4, 1762. Although Stephano Storace referred to himself as "a proper English gentleman" we shall continue to refer to him as Stephano in order to distinguish him from his son Stephen who features prominently in the life of his sister, Nancy.

Stephano Storace had left Naples sometime in the mid 1740s to find a better life in England. He was a violinist trained at the prestigious conservatory of music in Naples, but in England he changed his instrument to the double base and was eventually recognised as the best double bass player in England. He settled for a while in Dublin, where he soon found work at the Smock Alley Theatre managed by Thomas Sheridan, father of the great English dramatist, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, the future author of The School for Scandal and a future parliamentarian. The Sheridan name remains connected to the Storaces throughout their lives, despite the fact that at one stage Stephano Storace, in his zest for organising concerts pinched the whole band from Sheridan's theatre in order to perform at some benefit function. Stephano left Dublin at a later stage for London where he played at the King's Theatre, no doubt performing in works by Johann Christian Bach, Samuel Arnold and others, now forgotten composers. Stephano organised concerts at Marylebone Gardens during the summer and in the end married Elizabeth Trussler whose father had a lease on Marylebone Gardens where he sold confectionery and where his well-known concerts attracted such luminaries as the elderly Handel who would sit and listen to music and discuss it with his friend, Mr. Fountayne, the headmaster of a nearby school for children of the gentry.

Stephano watched in utter amazement the determination and enterprise of Leopold Mozart during the Mozart family visit to London in 1764-65. The example was not lost on him. Both his children learned to play the harpsichord and to sing at sight. Stephen was taught the violin so that at the age of 10 he could perform the most difficult works by Tartini and Giardini. Nancy, whose voice was showing great promise, was introduced by Stephano to his beloved Neapolitan street airs and arias from popular comic operas. She also learned the guitar and the harp. In her adult life she was a musician of considerable stature in an era when prima donnas were unable to read the simplest music. Nancy began her singing career at the age of 8 , which as we know, is much too early and accounted for the roughness of the lower register of her voice, which she could never overcome. Her career began at the Winchester Summer Festival where she sang airs by Thomas Linley, Sr., whose violin virtuoso son, also Thomas, befriended Mozart in Italy and whom Mozart mourned when he died in a boating accident aged 20.

Nancy on this occasion sang Linley Sr's. air, "The lark sings high in the cornfield." Music. [This is Emma Kirby singing the song which heralded the beginning of Nancy's career]. Nancy was engaged at the Salisbury Festival soon thereafter and then with her brother, Stephen at the Three Choirs Festival in Hereford. In April 1774 Stefano obtained a role for her at the King's Theatre and persuaded the noted Italian castrato, Venancio Rauzzini, to take her as pupil. Although Rauzzini was determined not to allow Nancy to sing for a few years, he himself succumbed to the temptation to let her perform in his own composition only a year later. Stephen was sent to Naples to study at his father's old alma mater and to live with his uncle, the Bishop Storace. In 1778 Nancy, aged 13, and her parents departed from England ostensibly for Nancy to study in Italy. It fact, it was a career move and Nancy would not see her native England for many years and her father, Stephano would die in Italy. The Storaces were reunited with Stephen in Naples and from there the entire family travelled to Florence. In Florence Nancy became "seconda dama" at the Pergola Theatre. The actual date of Nancy's operatic debut was 8th September, 1779 when she appeared in Bianchi's Castor & Pollux - just one of the thousands of mythological operas written almost on a daily basis throughout the 17th and 18th centuries.

Nancy's performance was vividly recalled some years later by the Victorian artist James Northcote in his autobiography Memorials of an English Painter. "Her first appearance," he wrote, "gained great approbation and she performed beyond all expectation." Northcote and Mr. Prince Hoare made her up and her brother, Stephen, played the harpsicord. Here we come across some people who were destined to play a major part in the lives of the Storace. Hoare who evidently met Stephen for the first time in Florence became a lifelong friend and wrote most of the libretti for Stephen's musical farces during the 1790s. Another person present was John Soane who was to become a prominent architect and Nancy's confidant. This season also included Sarti's Achille in Sciro in which Nancy appeared again as seconda dama. Michael Kelly, the Irish tenor, in his autobiography describes the event with the anecdote which followed Nancy wherever she went . The castrato, Marchesi, apparently astonished the audience with an amazing cadenza, immediately to be followed by Nancy who sang the same cadenza completely upstaging the castrato. According to Kelly, Marchesi stomped off the stage demanding the sacking of the young singer. Nancy was not sacked and she was still singing at the Theatro Pergola in Febraury 1780.

It was also during this period that Nancy began including arias composed by her brother, Stephen in every opera she appeared in, a practice she continued to the end of her career. It was the custom of the day for singers to insert whatever aria they wished into any opera they appeared in without comment from the audience who were often engaged in noisy discussions rather then in silent listening to the singers on stage. Nancy's skill in engaging the attention of audience, her playfulness and her temperament were more suited for comic opera, opera buffa and this genre became her specialty. It was a propitious time for a singer with Nancy's particular talent. The pleasant, undemanding musical comedies were rapidly overtaking the old mythological operas in popularity all over Europe. It was just one more aspect of that fundamental change in taste which replaced the grandiose splendour of the baroque with the elegance, charm and sentimentality of the "galant" or rococo.

The Storace family travelled through Italy and Nancy was engaged as prima buffa at Livorno, Lucca and Parma during the following two years. In the autumn of 1780, Nancy and Stephen met Michael Kelly, their great friend, Stephen's collaborator and Nancy's colleague, on the pier at Livorno. Much that we know of Nancy's and Mozart's collaboration and Nancy's life in Vienna comes from this Irish tenor's autobiography. As he remained their friend during the rest of their lives, his comments are a valuable addition to the recorded history of Nancy and Stephen Storace.

This is Kelly's report of their first meeting: "I had a Sicialian capote with my hair of which I had a great quantity and which, like my complexion, was very fair. I was as thin as a walking stick. As I stepped off the boat, I perceived a young lady and a gentleman standing on the Mole making observations; the former looked at me and laughed, and as I approached, I heard her say to her companion in English, which, of course, she thought I could not understand, "Look at that girl dressed in boy's clothes". To her astonishment, I answered in the same language, "You are mistaken, Miss, I am a very proper "HE" animal and quite at your service." "We laughed till we were tired and became immediately intimate and those persons, my acquaintances with whom commenced (a friendship) by this childish jest on the Mole at Leghorn continued through life (to be )the warmest and most attached of my friends."

About this time Stefano Storace died. Stephen returned to England where for a while he tried a life as a painter but after much difficulty he returned to composing, his first published work; a cantata for two sopranos has been lost. Elizabeth Storace continued to strive for her daughter's fame and fortune. In 1782 Nancy was engaged as prima buffa at La Scala in Milan. Here, the 16 year old Nancy met the baritone Franceso Benucci for the first time. Later he would be Figaro to her Susanna in the first performance of Mozart's Marriage of Figaro. However, this still lay in the future. During this time, Joseph II in Vienna, decided to reestablish the Italian opera. Before he became Emperor, and in his early years on the throne, he had conscientiously promoted German-language plays and comic operas - or singspiele. He found himself, however, not caring much for German opera nor for the French opera-comique. He had at first believed that German opera would succeed in Vienna but the audiences still believed that nothing but Italian opera would do. In fact, their hankering for Italian opera was entirely justified for most of the German singers possessed neither the musical talent nor the voices of their Italian colleagues. Except for Aloysia Weber, Mozart's sister-in-law, few singers were suited to the opera buffa style then sweeping through Europe. In 1783 the Emperor Joseph II instructed his Court musical director, Antonio Salieri to contact the various Austrian ambassadors in Europe for information on promising singers. The Austrian Ambassador in Venice, Count Durazzo, supplied three names - Kelly, Benucci and Anna Storace. Salieri had already heard Nancy in Venice as well as in Milan where she had partnered Benucci. While Nancy Storace, Kelly and Benucci were mulling over the one year contracts offered them by Joseph II, in Vienna Mozart was establishing his own career and the newly arrived Lorenzo Da Ponte was beginning to turn his considerable talent to writing libretti for the composers who flocked to Vienna then considered the capital of musical Europe. Michael Kelly describes the inducements from the Viennese Court as being excellent. Apart from free accommodation and four large candles per day, free fuel and a carriage to take him wherever he wished to go, he was paid 400 gulden. His accommodation consisted of first and second floor elegantly furnished rooms the best he had lived in so far and included a cook as well as a housemaid. Nancy and her mother were housed in an imposing mansion, the Graf Claryschen House, which now houses the Museum of Lower Austria. Besides the same luxuries extended to Kelly, Nancy received 1000 gulden per year and was allowed two benefit concerts annually. Even for a 17 year old young woman accustomed to the adulation of audiences in all the main Italian opera houses, to arrive in the cultural capital of Europe as the much heralded star of the new opera company must have been an intoxicating experience. But Nancy took it all in her stride; as easy, natural, extrovert and self-confident off-stage as on, whether talking with musicians like Salieri or the aging Gluck, the opera director Count Rosenberg or, indeed, the Emperor himself, who never ceased to be amused by her directness and disarming, even impudent candour.

Yet there must have been nerves. The first review of her role in a Salieri opera concluded that, "the leading female singer (Nancy) sings agreeably, on the other hand her actions are stiff." Nancy began studying her German colleagues, especially Aloysia Weber, whose acting was superb. Soon she was able to surpass the natural acting ability of her German colleagues. The Burgtheater, the home of the Italian opera, was not particularly large, holding only 800 spectators. The stage was as small as that of today's Glyndebourne or Drottingholm and this too caused difficulties after the generous stages of the Italian opera houses. All this took some time to get used to but in the end she found it was a pleasure to sing in this charming, intimate theatre. It was open to all who could afford its fairly modest prices. Nancy's schedule was heavy. The season was long and even during Lent there were rehearsals for the singers. In June and July the Emperor invited the singers to Laxenburgh, his summer residence, where Nancy was required to give nightly performances. All this became too much for the young girl and Nancy collapsed in early June during the performance of a Sarti opera.

There was an outcry from the Italian company foreasier working conditions and more pay. In the end the drama was resolved and contracts were signed for a further 3 years. Working standards improved and suddenly even the programs became better. Nancy appeared in Paisielo's setting of Beaumarchais' play The Barber of Seville. Count Zinzendorff, the diarist to whom we owe an enormous debt for recording his musical experiences during the late 18th century, and who has become somewhat of a guide to modern Mozart scholars, recorded the following impression of Nancy's appearance in Paisielo's opera. " ... I listened with exquisite pleasure. Storace sang like an angel. Her lovely eyes, her snow-white neck, her fine bosom, her fresh mouth made a charming effect." Paisiello's opera has been completely overshadowed by Rossini's masterpiece. However, compared with most comic operas of the time, before the Marriage of Figaro it is an accomplished, entertaining and occasionally original piece of musical theatre. Nancy was cast as Rosina and here we have Rosina's aria, sung by Lella Corbelli.

Nancy's professional and financial circumstances were most satisfactory but her personal life began to crumble. The winter of 1783-4 was particularly hard with heavy snow followed by serious flooding. Elizabeth Storace missed London. Unable to speak German and the lack of friends and family, her worry about her son Stephen prompted Nancy's mother to commit a mistake she would regret for the rest of her life. During this winter an old colleague of Stephano Storace, a certain violinist, Dr. John Abraham Fisher (whom Kelly called the ugliest Christian on earth) arrived in Vienna after completing a concert tour of Russia. He lodged with the Storaces and ingratiated himself with Elizabeth by drinking numerous cups of tea with her and listening to the lonely woman's recital of woes. Not only were the climate and the relentless schedule wearing Nancy down but now she was faced with her mother's wish that she marry Fisher, which would allow Elizabeth to return to England. On the 21 March 1784 the wedding license was granted and shortly thereafter Nancy married a man, older than her father would have been, in the Chapel of the Dutch Embassy. Already on 15 April Zinzerdorf wrote in his diary: "Fisher is beating his wife." Kelly continues the sorry tale: "She had come in a short time to repent her bargain for instead of harmony, there was nothing but discord between them and it was said that he had a very striking way of enforcing his opinions of which friends of hers informed the Emperor, who intimated to Fisher that it would be fit for him to try a change of air, and so the doctor was banished from Vienna."

There is no indication of when this somewhat medieval gesture took place. It was, as Kelly implies, an informal arrangement not a formal prosecution. It was effective nonetheless. Fisher would find no doors open to him in Vienna or the rest of the Empire.H e became persona non grata throughout Europe but would not consent to a formal divorce and in later years made an attempt to secure compensation from his still legal wife. However, for Nancy, the break was complete from the start. She never considered herself a married woman and never used her husband's name. In October 1784, a young opera singer Louisa Laschi arrived in Vienna. The Wienerkronik mercilessly compared Nancy to Louisa. "She (Laschi) is still very young, has a lovely, clear voice which will grow rounder and stronger with time ... has a pretty figure. Madame Fisher is only superior in experience..." The bitchy reference to Laschi's pretty figure was due to the fact that Nancy was pregnant. Always on the plump side, her predicament did not show at first. Nancy's clearly unwanted pregnancy coincided with the arrival of her brother, who came to Vienna, not just to visit and console his mother and sister, but to write and rehearse a comic opera of his own in which Nancy would play the leading role. The Emperor had given in to Nancy's pleas on behalf of her brother.

After the misery of her trials and tribulations with Fisher, Stephen's arrival in Vienna was indeed a blessing. Da Ponte was engaged to write the libretto for Stephen Storace's first major work, Gli sposi malcontenti (The Unhappy Couple). Not unlike the theme of Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, the main character laments the loss of her husband's affection. The plaintiveness of the piece, the strain of her condition and the fight to keep going that had previously sustained her were too much. Nancy lost her voice in the middle of the main aria and was compelled to retire from the stage. This was a fiasco she certainly did not wish to create during her brother's great moment. Nancy was absolutely grief stricken. Sick with remorse at having let her brother down so completely, she remained in total seclusion and silence for four months from that dreadful night. Later that month Nancy's baby was born - a little girl - and Nancy would have nothing to do with it. The unwanted child was farmed out and died within a month. This is hard for us to understand nowadays, but it was the heartless custom of the day and Nancy and her mother made it clear that they did not care if it lived or died.

On 26 September 1785, Nancy returned to the stage as Rosina in Paisiello's Barber of Seville to great success. Music. [Lella Corbelli sings Rosina's aria from the second act.] The same evening some of her colleagues performed a little piece to celebrate her return to the stage. It was called "A salute to the recuperating Ophelia" with words by Da Ponte, and music from the combined talents of Mozart and Salieri. and someone calling himself "Cornetti". This was her brother Stephen who had conceived the whole idea. It is indeed a tragedy that the music, the only co-operation between Mozart and Salieri has been lost to posterity. In November 1785 she handed in her resignation to the Emperor but it was not accepted. She had desperately wanted to end her miserable year in Vienna and return with her brother to England. She was told she must work out her three year contract. She was far too valuable to the company for any concessions to be made. As a sweetener, Stephen, whose opera met with great success, was offered another commission by the Emperor. At this point, Nancy also began a an intense relationship with the baritone Benucci, which lasted all through the first half of 1786.

Mozart had been searching for a good libretto in order to establish himself as a composer of Italian opera. He had hopes that Da Ponte would write a libretto for him but, for a while, Da Ponte was busy writing librettos for Salieri and other composers. The two met one evening at the home of Baron Wetzlar. During the course of the evening Mozart suggested that an adaptation of the Marriage of Figaro, Beaumarchais' sequel to the Barber of Seville, which had met with such great success in Vienna, would lend itself to an opera. Da Ponte immediately seized upon the idea but Mozart had reservation as to its feasibility. Because of its political allusions, the performance of the Marriage of Figaro, the play, had recently been forbidden by the Emperor. Baron Wetzlar was quite keen to finance the opera in another country but Da Ponte rejected the good Baron's offer and instead persuaded the Emperor to allow the opera to be produced, promising to exclude anything that would offend his Majesty. With Nancy Storace very much in both men's minds, the role of Susanna was born. Benucci was assigned the role of Figaro, both the composer and librettist keeping in mind the love affair of the two principal singers and how this would affect the sparkle of the opera. Louisa Laschi was recalled from Naples specifically to take the part of the Countess and the highly experienced Mandini was assigned the role of the count.•
Last edited by Lance on Thu Nov 15, 2007 5:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Agnes Selby
Author of Constanze Mozart's biography
Posts: 5568
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 3:27 am
Location: Australia

Storace

Post by Agnes Selby » Wed Nov 14, 2007 6:36 pm

Thank you, Lance for posting the above. It is a talk I gave
to "Opera Lunedi" a music society in Sydney and hence the mention of
arias which I played during the talk.

Regards,
Agnes.

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
Posts: 4223
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Location: Irvington, NY

Post by Werner » Wed Nov 14, 2007 7:56 pm

And thank you, Agnes, for sharing this with us!
Werner Isler

Teresa B
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Post by Teresa B » Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:22 pm

Agnes, thanks for a great post! What a fascinatig life Nancy Storace led.

All the best,
Teresa
"We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." ~ The Cheshire Cat

Author of the novel "Creating Will"

Agnes Selby
Author of Constanze Mozart's biography
Posts: 5568
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 3:27 am
Location: Australia

Storace

Post by Agnes Selby » Thu Nov 15, 2007 12:02 am

Thank you Teresa and Werner. Yes, she did have a fascinating life.
Lance very kindly cut the talk down as it would have been too long
for these pages.

By a strange coincidence when we lived in London, we lived in Brockwell Park Gardens. There was a very lovely mansion facing the gardens
which was in the process of being renovated. At the time I did not know it was once Ann Storace's house. The gardens are now a public park. Every Sunday cricket was played there and my husband was an avid fan. It was also a favourite playground for children.

Regards,
Agnes.
-----------------------

Monn

Re: Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

Post by Monn » Thu Nov 15, 2007 3:52 pm

Lance wrote:[Article suggested by Agnes Selby]

Later that month Nancy's baby was born - a little girl - and Nancy would have nothing to do with it. The unwanted child was farmed out and died within a month. This is hard for us to understand nowadays, but it was the heartless custom of the day and Nancy and her mother made it clear that they did not care if it lived or died.
This paragraph is based on a popular misunderstanding. Storace's daughter was not born in July, but in January 1785. And the girl was not "farmed out", but died in the same house in July 1785 where she was born.

Agnes Selby
Author of Constanze Mozart's biography
Posts: 5568
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 3:27 am
Location: Australia

Re: Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

Post by Agnes Selby » Thu Nov 15, 2007 4:55 pm

Monn wrote:
Lance wrote:[Article suggested by Agnes Selby]

Later that month Nancy's baby was born - a little girl - and Nancy would have nothing to do with it. The unwanted child was farmed out and died within a month. This is hard for us to understand nowadays, but it was the heartless custom of the day and Nancy and her mother made it clear that they did not care if it lived or died.
This paragraph is based on a popular misunderstanding. Storace's daughter was not born in July, but in January 1785. And the girl was not "farmed out", but died in the same house in July 1785 where she was born.
----------

Can you please supply references to your assertions, Herr Doctor {Removed}?

---------------------------------

Monn

Re: Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

Post by Monn » Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:45 am

Agnes Selby wrote:
Monn wrote:
Lance wrote:[Article suggested by Agnes Selby]

Later that month Nancy's baby was born - a little girl - and Nancy would have nothing to do with it. The unwanted child was farmed out and died within a month. This is hard for us to understand nowadays, but it was the heartless custom of the day and Nancy and her mother made it clear that they did not care if it lived or died.
This paragraph is based on a popular misunderstanding. Storace's daughter was not born in July, but in January 1785. And the girl was not "farmed out", but died in the same house in July 1785 where she was born.
----------

Can you please supply references to your assertions, Herr Doctor {Removed}?

---------------------------------

You are cordially invited to follow the rules of this forum and spare me the strange allusions to your doctor. I guess you'll simply have to trust me on this. In the same way you expect to be trusted, when you write a long article without giving any sources. Suffice to say, I got the above information from a very reliable person.

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
Posts: 4223
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:23 pm
Location: Irvington, NY

Post by Werner » Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:50 am

Well, Doctor or no doctor, I don't know you. I do know Agnes Selby and her credentials. Guess whom I trust.

And, having just surfaced on this forum - at least under this name, - how do you come to cite the forum's rules?
Last edited by Werner on Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Werner Isler

Agnes Selby
Author of Constanze Mozart's biography
Posts: 5568
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 3:27 am
Location: Australia

Re: Anna Selina (Nancy) Storace and Mozart (article)

Post by Agnes Selby » Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:53 am

Monn wrote:
Agnes Selby wrote:
Monn wrote:
Lance wrote:[Article suggested by Agnes Selby]

Later that month Nancy's baby was born - a little girl - and Nancy would have nothing to do with it. The unwanted child was farmed out and died within a month. This is hard for us to understand nowadays, but it was the heartless custom of the day and Nancy and her mother made it clear that they did not care if it lived or died.
This paragraph is based on a popular misunderstanding. Storace's daughter was not born in July, but in January 1785. And the girl was not "farmed out", but died in the same house in July 1785 where she was born.
----------

Can you please supply references to your assertions, Herr Doctor {Removed}?

---------------------------------

You are cordially invited to follow the rules of this forum and spare me the strange allusions to your doctor. I guess you'll simply have to trust me on this. In the same way you expect to be trusted, when you write a long article without giving any sources. Suffice to say, I got the above information from a very reliable person.
-------------

My source, as you will see at the beginning of my article is Geofrey Brace. His is so far the only biography of Nancy Storace.

Who is the reliable person and where does his information come from?
I would be very happy to read the information your informant is informing you about.

Herr Doctor, I am adhering to the rules of this forum. Are you?

------------------

Donald Isler
Posts: 2986
Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 11:01 am
Contact:

Post by Donald Isler » Sun Nov 18, 2007 8:38 am

Monn wrote:

"I guess you'll simply have to trust me on this..................................................... Suffice to say, I got the above information from a very reliable person."


This guy doesn't sound like any kind of scholar. No one who wants to be taken seriously would give an answer like this.
Donald Isler

Agnes Selby
Author of Constanze Mozart's biography
Posts: 5568
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 3:27 am
Location: Australia

Storace

Post by Agnes Selby » Sun Nov 18, 2007 2:34 pm

Dear Werner and Donald,

Thank you for your posts, and Donald you are right. This
person sounds less and less like Dr. {Removed}.

Regards,
Agnes.

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