The Most Hated Compositions

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
TopoGigio

The Most Hated Compositions

Post by TopoGigio » Sat Apr 19, 2008 10:52 am

I vote for "Pierrot Lunaire"
Its very good. :cry:

johnQpublic
Posts: 1981
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 3:00 pm

Post by johnQpublic » Sat Apr 19, 2008 11:39 am

I vote for the Violin Sonatas by Bartok.

Very good but so misunderstood by John Q Public.

WAIT!! No it's not. I like them.
Image

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17669
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Sat Apr 19, 2008 12:56 pm

Eine Kleine Nachtmusik... :shock:
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

Seán
Posts: 5339
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:46 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Post by Seán » Sat Apr 19, 2008 1:19 pm

Any pop, U2 stuff, etc, etc. With particular emphasis on the word hate.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
Posts: 4223
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:23 pm
Location: Irvington, NY

Post by Werner » Sat Apr 19, 2008 1:34 pm

One work - Ravel's Bolero.
Werner Isler

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Sat Apr 19, 2008 1:38 pm


stenka razin
CMG's Chief Decorator
Posts: 4005
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 7:59 am
Location: In The Steppes Of Central Asia

Post by stenka razin » Sat Apr 19, 2008 2:24 pm

Hate is a very strong word. I do not hate anything Classical. I might not like or understand what I am listening to, but, at the least, I pay attention. Sometimes things that you do not like grow on you as you get older. Just keep listening and have an open mind. Today's enemy might be tomorrow's friend. :) :) :) :)

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
Posts: 4223
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:23 pm
Location: Irvington, NY

Post by Werner » Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:57 pm

A good point, stenka razin. But old and older as I get, I still don't like the Bolero.
Werner Isler

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Apr 19, 2008 4:32 pm

Beethoven's 9th. If I never hear it again, it will be too soon.

Followed quickly by the rest of Beethoven's and Brahms symphonic output, except for Brahm's 1st Serenade.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

BWV 1080
Posts: 4451
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 10:05 pm

Post by BWV 1080 » Sat Apr 19, 2008 4:42 pm

Carmina Burana

Anton Webern

Post by Anton Webern » Sat Apr 19, 2008 4:47 pm

johnQpublic wrote: Very good but so misunderstood by John Q Public.
That's because you are trying to think Bartok when you should be thinking Strauss, Debussy and Schoenberg. Everything prior to the Piano Sonata was a constant struggle for Bartok to find his own voice (which achieved it's last touch when he discovered Stravinsky), and the variety of styles adopted in this period is very varied but a bit inconsistent.

Heck148
Posts: 3563
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2003 11:53 pm
Location: New England

Post by Heck148 » Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:14 pm

Pachelbel Canon

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:28 am

Corlyss_D wrote: Followed quickly by the rest of Beethoven's and Brahms symphonic output, except for Brahm's 1st Serenade.
Interesting that you would pick the 1st Serenade as the exception. Widely considered Brahms' "rehearsals" before he wrote a "real symphony," they are pleasant enough, and Brahms did not burn them as he did so many things he considered unsatisfactory, but a case could be made that Dvorak in his best symphonies such as the Seventh did an end run around the Brahms symphonies and headed straight for the Serenades.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Teresa B
Posts: 3057
Joined: Thu May 26, 2005 11:04 am
Location: Tampa, Florida

Post by Teresa B » Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:56 am

Stockhausen's piano pieces.

Teresa
"We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." ~ The Cheshire Cat

Author of the novel "Creating Will"

Auntie Lynn
Posts: 1123
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 10:42 pm

Post by Auntie Lynn » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:07 am

Strauss' Metamorphosen - I never miss an opportunity to post it on threads like this...

hangos
Posts: 983
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 6:44 pm
Location: England

Post by hangos » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:14 am

Anton Webern wrote:
johnQpublic wrote: Very good but so misunderstood by John Q Public.
That's because you are trying to think Bartok when you should be thinking Strauss, Debussy and Schoenberg. Everything prior to the Piano Sonata was a constant struggle for Bartok to find his own voice (which achieved it's last touch when he discovered Stravinsky), and the variety of styles adopted in this period is very varied but a bit inconsistent.
Anton
Are you sure of your chronology here? The piano sonata was written in 1926, a great year for his piano music.

Surely,though, the Miraculous Mandarin dates from 1919 and the Dance Suite from 1923 - most Bartok experts count these two works as "typical" or "mature" Bartok.

I agree that many of his earlier works before 1918 do reflect a struggle to find his own synthesised voice, but I don't hear the struggle of styles in Mandarin and Dance suite!

Beckmesser
Posts: 491
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:11 pm
Location: Columbia/Westchester Counties NY

Post by Beckmesser » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:21 am

Corlyss_D wrote:Beethoven's 9th. If I never hear it again, it will be too soon.
In recent years Tanglewood has made it a "tradition" to close the season with a performance of Beethoven's Ninth. I invariably groan when I see it listed in the program and yet it has an impact on me every time I hear it.

diegobueno
Winds Specialist
Posts: 2501
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 2:26 pm
Contact:

Post by diegobueno » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:58 am

My favorite piece to hate is Ein Heldenleben.

lismahago
Posts: 136
Joined: Sat May 28, 2005 12:51 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Post by lismahago » Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:13 am

Auntie Lynn wrote:Strauss' Metamorphosen
I second that. A late relative of mine used to ask to hear Metamorphosen every time he visited. I made him a present of the LP, so then I would never have to hear it again!
Ciaran

Anton Webern

Post by Anton Webern » Sun Apr 20, 2008 12:00 pm

hangos wrote: Anton

Are you sure of your chronology here? The piano sonata was written in 1926, a great year for his piano music.

Surely,though, the Miraculous Mandarin dates from 1919 and the Dance Suite from 1923 - most Bartok experts count these two works as "typical" or "mature" Bartok.

I agree that many of his earlier works before 1918 do reflect a struggle to find his own synthesised voice, but I don't hear the struggle of styles in Mandarin and Dance suite!
My date for the second Violin Sonata is 1922. I don't think the chronology matters though. Yes, he went really close to his typical style at one point but then reverted to something different under the influence of Schoenberg. His thoughts weren't crystallized yet, and only achieved final, definite form with the period encompassing the Piano Sonata, the Third String Quartet and so on. This lasted for most of his remaining career until he started to change things to a more "diatonic" sound in mind. It seems that even after finding his voice he just couldn't settle. That's the type of man he was.

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:12 pm

Werner wrote:One work - Ravel's Bolero.
*****

Say Hallelujah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

hangos
Posts: 983
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 6:44 pm
Location: England

Post by hangos » Sun Apr 20, 2008 2:14 pm

Anton Webern wrote:
hangos wrote: Anton

Are you sure of your chronology here? The piano sonata was written in 1926, a great year for his piano music.

Surely,though, the Miraculous Mandarin dates from 1919 and the Dance Suite from 1923 - most Bartok experts count these two works as "typical" or "mature" Bartok.

I agree that many of his earlier works before 1918 do reflect a struggle to find his own synthesised voice, but I don't hear the struggle of styles in Mandarin and Dance suite!
My date for the second Violin Sonata is 1922. I don't think the chronology matters though. Yes, he went really close to his typical style at one point but then reverted to something different under the influence of Schoenberg. His thoughts weren't crystallized yet, and only achieved final, definite form with the period encompassing the Piano Sonata, the Third String Quartet and so on. This lasted for most of his remaining career until he started to change things to a more "diatonic" sound in mind. It seems that even after finding his voice he just couldn't settle. That's the type of man he was.
Anton,
Fair point - I've read a lot of reviews of the two violin sonatas which say they sound like "a dose of undigested Schoenberg" and I would also agree that they are not easy listening even for Bartok's most loyal aficionados (of which I am one). For me they represent Bartok's most extreme music, even more so than the 3rd quartet of 1927, whose violence and vehemence apparently shocked your namesake when he first heard it performed!
Bartok was indeed a restless spirit - I believe he once characterised one of his main techniques as "variation"
Whatever, he must surely be regarded as a great 20th century composer.
Of course, Stravinsky was even more changeable and chameleonesque, the Picasso of music? (like Miles Davis in the world of jazz)
Martin

Auntie Lynn
Posts: 1123
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 10:42 pm

Post by Auntie Lynn » Sun Apr 20, 2008 5:44 pm

Well, I ain't the greatest dance historian that ever lived, but it you think of Bolero as a polonaise (which it is), it goes down easier...anyway, it is one of The Great Pieces to see performed live - it's a hoot. First set on Ida Rubenstein (who, at the time, was reported to have the most beautiful legs in the world), it was another of those events that caused a riot at inception...

dulcinea
Posts: 3466
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:39 pm
Location: tampa, fl

Post by dulcinea » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:05 pm

:x :x :x :x :x :x I am sick of 99% of the music of WUSF-FM, which I heard several times over by the time I finished my first year of residence in Tampa; if I were in charge of WUSF-FM I would play a piece only ONCE in the year, preferably during the birthday of the composer; more importantly, I would look for music that is either unfamiliar--other works of Enescu besides the ROMANIAN RHAPSODIES--or which has just been created--I would like to know what else Bolcom has written besides the GRACEFUL GHOST RAG.
If you have listened to a piece of music too often, the moment inevitably comes when you become DEAF to that music. While I was doing some computer work, I turned on the radio, and the 3rd Symphony of Brahms started to play. I was absorbed in my work, until a moment came that I felt an odd feeling. I looked up, saw my radio, which is set on top of my computer, and I suddenly realised that the music had ended minutes before. I had become so excessively accostumed to that piece that I HAD NOT HEARD A SINGLE NOTE OF IT.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Wallingford
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:32 pm

Teresa B wrote:Stockhausen's piano pieces.

Teresa
Right on!

Ditto Boulez & all those others who hadn't an inkling of how a keyboardist's technique operates (or if they did, it's their idea of a Musikalischer Spass).
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Jack Kelso
Posts: 3004
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 11:52 pm
Location: Mannheim, Germany

Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Apr 23, 2008 1:54 am

Seán wrote:Any pop, U2 stuff, etc, etc. With particular emphasis on the word hate.
I am in full agreement, Sean. But among "works (often!) considered to be great masterpieces" my pet peeve is Brahms' "Double Concerto", especially the 1st movement! :)

Tschüß!
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

Ken
Posts: 2511
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 6:17 am
Location: Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Post by Ken » Mon Apr 28, 2008 5:45 am

I guess I'm still affected by the so-called 'Greatest Hits', because I in fact love many of the works that have been cited in this thread!
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

nadej_baptiste
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:41 pm
Location: Seattle
Contact:

Post by nadej_baptiste » Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:15 pm

Thus Spake Zarathustra, Strauss tone poems, The Ring, Parsifal, Symphonie Fantastique, Debussy piano works, Chopin nocturnes/ballades/etudes/blah blah blah.
--Kamila

Beckmesser
Posts: 491
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:11 pm
Location: Columbia/Westchester Counties NY

Post by Beckmesser » Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:24 pm

nadej_batiste wrote:Thus Spake Zarathustra, Strauss tone poems, The Ring, Parsifal, Symphonie Fantastique, Debussy piano works, Chopin nocturnes/ballades/etudes/blah blah blah.
I wonder what quality these works have in common that could inspire hatred.

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17669
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:52 pm

Beckmesser wrote:
nadej_batiste wrote:Thus Spake Zarathustra, Strauss tone poems, The Ring, Parsifal, Symphonie Fantastique, Debussy piano works, Chopin nocturnes/ballades/etudes/blah blah blah.
I wonder what quality these works have in common that could inspire hatred.
Hackneyed, Bombastic, Boring, Tedious, Cliched, Self Important, so last century but one... :wink:

OK, that took care of Strauss, Wagner and Berlioz...anybody want to do the other two...
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

James

Post by James » Tue Apr 29, 2008 4:29 pm

I'm allergic & loathe the vast majority of music from over-rated composers like Beethoven & Mozart.

DavidRoss
Posts: 3384
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 7:05 am
Location: Northern California

Post by DavidRoss » Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:17 pm

Wagner's Ring. Most hated because most over-rated, indulgent, boring, and looooooooooooong.
Last edited by DavidRoss on Sat May 03, 2008 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

nadej_baptiste
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:41 pm
Location: Seattle
Contact:

Post by nadej_baptiste » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:40 pm

Beckmesser wrote:
nadej_batiste wrote:Thus Spake Zarathustra, Strauss tone poems, The Ring, Parsifal, Symphonie Fantastique, Debussy piano works, Chopin nocturnes/ballades/etudes/blah blah blah.
I wonder what quality these works have in common that could inspire hatred.
Not hatred -- thorough dislike and repulsion. And I doubt they have something really tying them together other than my own subjective opinion.
--Kamila

nadej_baptiste
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:41 pm
Location: Seattle
Contact:

Post by nadej_baptiste » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:45 pm

Chalkperson wrote:
OK, that took care of Strauss, Wagner and Berlioz...anybody want to do the other two...
Well...Debussy is also sloshily self indulgent to my ears...

Chopin's piano music, to me, is very small...of course lots of it is very beautiful and fun, but in the end all I can hear is music meant to be...showcased. Not...lived. So it's very pianistic, and limited, in that sense. That's my take on it, anywho.
--Kamila

BC
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:31 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by BC » Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:15 am

Coming back to classical music after several years of not listening to it very much, I'm surprised by how little I enjoy Beethoven's orchestral music. I liked it well enough when I was younger.

Hatred would be much too strong a word, but I live in a small city and do find it frustrating that visiting orchestras so often include a least one Beethoven piece in their programme. I'd guess that at least 40% of programmes include some Beethoven, and all too often I find myself sitting bored wishing the Beethoven was finished and we could get to the piece(s) I've actually come to hear.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 25 guests