The first section of #29 simply ROCKS!

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nosreme
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The first section of #29 simply ROCKS!

Post by nosreme » Wed Feb 05, 2014 7:09 am


John F
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Re: The first section of #29 simply ROCKS!

Post by John F » Wed Feb 05, 2014 7:28 am

Which is Bach's arrangement of this:

John Francis

nosreme
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Re: The first section of #29 simply ROCKS!

Post by nosreme » Wed Feb 05, 2014 8:13 am

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Last edited by nosreme on Mon Feb 10, 2014 6:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

jbuck919
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Re: The first section of #29 simply ROCKS!

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Feb 05, 2014 1:39 pm

nosreme wrote:That partita prelude not only shows up in Cantata 29 but in Cantata 120a.

Speaking of parody--the wonderful final section of Cantata 29 -- the "old 100th hymn music" must be the most self-parodied of all. I found it in at least 6 different compositions. And the B-Minor Mass, of course, parodies many different cantatas, some of them secular.
I'm not sure what you mean by "old 100th hymn music." Old 100th is the well-known hymn tune to which one sings, among other things, the words "Praise God, from whom all blessings flow." AFAIK it doesn't exist in German music. This tune is the chorale Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren, one of Bach's favorites, and when it turns up in more than one place (as in the motet Jesu meine Freude, for instance, or the solo cantata Jauchzet Gott), it is just the same chorale being dealt with differently, perhaps sung to a different verse, rather than a parody. Bach did that with many chorales, but Sei Lob und Preis is unusually long and grand. The number in that cantata that is parodied, as you yourself imply, is the opening chorus, which was used twice in the B minor Mass (the first time for the text "Gratias agimus tibi..." which means pretty much the same in Latin as "Wir Danken dir Gott" in German).

The problem with the arrangement from the violin partita is that these groups making studio recordings have to rely on small portatif/positif organs, which may be OK for continuo but are too tonally limited for obbligato. The same problem occurs in the Harnoncourt recording. Suzuki uses such an organ even for a live performance like this one which takes place in a concert hall, but Ton Koopman does the same even when he is performing in a church (check out his YouTube of Cantata 147), probably in part because of issues of tuning and placement. Bach himself would have just used the big organ at his disposal with an appropriate registration so as to have the proper balance. if you know of a performance that does this, please let me know.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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