Tristan or Pinkerton

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Mon Mar 21, 2016 8:56 am

I was reviewing next year's Met season and ask this: Is this new Met production of Tristan about Tristan or has Madam Butterfly's Pinkerton somehow snuck into the production?

Regards, Len :(



The Baden Baden Festival Description


"Oceanic passions.

To say that Wagner’s “Tristan” defines an era would be an understatement: rather, it marks the end of a century and the beginning of a new one. Probably the most important opera of the 19th century, it set the ravages of love to music. The action starts on board a ship, and the setting is key to the plot: the orchestra is like the ocean, the characters are boats, thrown hither and tither by the waves until they are smashed against the magnetic cliffs of desire. A related story tells of the Sirens, whose singing is so irresistible that the hapless sailors are compelled to follow its sound and get crushed unless they are either deaf or tied to the mast. Wagner’s music shares this siren quality, and the world’s best orchestra will unleash it for us."


"The Met description

"The three acts of the opera are originally set, respectively, aboard ship on the Irish Sea, in Cornwall (southwestern Britain), and in Brittany (northwestern France). The many versions of this story all pay homage to the Celtic ambience and probable origin of the tale. Wagner’s preservation of this context emphasizes several key themes associated with ancient Celtic culture: mysticism, knowledge of the magic arts, an evolved warrior code, and a distinctly non-Christian vision of the possibilities of the afterlife."

Image


Image

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by jbuck919 » Mon Mar 21, 2016 3:01 pm

lennygoran wrote:I was reviewing next year's Met season and ask this: Is this new Met production of Tristan about Tristan or has Madam Butterfly's Pinkerton somehow snuck into the production?

Regards, Len :(
Not to mention Phantom of the Opera. As usual, I wouldn't recommend jumping to conclusions about a production based on two stills.

The London Times has an article about this, but unfortunately it is cut off by their paywall.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Mon Mar 21, 2016 4:21 pm

jbuck919 wrote: As usual, I wouldn't recommend jumping to conclusions about a production based on two stills. ...
The London Times has an article about this, but unfortunately it is cut off by their paywall.
Thanks the stills make me a little nervous but I want to read more-I think it opens later this week at Baden Baden and I hope to read some reviews. Regards, Len

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Tue Mar 22, 2016 10:41 am

Here's the London Times review-Neil Fisher who I see tweets with the likes of Alex Ross. Regards, Len :(

Not for Simon Rattle the simple pleasures of a Brit at Easter: chocolate-scoffing with the kids, Mary Poppins on TV. Instead the conductor takes the Berlin Philharmonic to Baden-Baden, a spa resort in the Black Forest. That’s an advantage, because you’ll want a calming massage or warm plunge pool after Rattle’s sumptuous conducting of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde.

This is a towering performance by the Berliners, both piercingly beautiful and dangerously overpowering, matching Wagner’s score for every love-drunk step it takes towards total annihilation. If it’s also literally overpowering, unfortunately, for some of the singers, it’s hard to begrudge Rattle for not holding back: if you drive the best sports car in the world, would you keep the brakes on?

Beyond the sheer weight of sound, however, what impresses most is Rattle’s ability to weigh each texture: I’ve never heard the woodwind murmurs of Act II’s nocturnal reverie as pinprick clear; nor the dissonances of Act III as soulfully unwound. A special mention goes to Dominik Wollenweber’s cor anglais, never this desolate or haunting.

Mariusz Trelinski’s staging, destined for the Met in New York, will need fine-tuning. Wagner’s lovers call themselves “far from the sun”, and Trelinski mostly plunges them into stygian gloom (lighting, or lack of, is by Marc Heinz), with occasional sci-fi video of two planets (or suns) aligning, a distant, unreal idea of resolution.

There are glimpses of waves, of seagulls, billowing clouds, places both seductive and threatening. Yet the physical setting, a modern warship with grim cabins and steel gantries, and (in Act II) a cocktail lounge with naff drinks trolley, is clunky, and the characters are not directed tightly enough to let a human drama breathe alongside a transcendental one.

Tackling this killer role for the first time, Stuart Skelton has the power and lyricism and is tremendously affecting in his Act III agonies. It bodes very well for his Tristan at English National Opera in the summer. Eva-Maria Westbroek, though lustily acclaimed, fares worse as Isolde: the voice spread alarmingly at times, and high notes were cut short or not there at all. There is superb support from Sarah Connolly’s Brangäne, Michael Nagy’s Kurwenal and Stephen Milling’s Mark — but it’s Rattle’s triumph.

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Mar 22, 2016 3:46 pm

Mariusz Trelinski’s staging, destined for the Met in New York, will need fine-tuning. Wagner’s lovers call themselves “far from the sun”, and Trelinski mostly plunges them into stygian gloom (lighting, or lack of, is by Marc Heinz), with occasional sci-fi video of two planets (or suns) aligning, a distant, unreal idea of resolution.
If one of the planets is Venus, he's gotten the wrong opera.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Tue Mar 22, 2016 3:58 pm

jbuck919 wrote:


If one of the planets is Venus, he's gotten the wrong opera.
Still I'm concerned with what kind of wine they'll be drinking at the " cocktail lounge with naff drinks ." Regards, Len :(

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Mar 22, 2016 5:32 pm

lennygoran wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:


If one of the planets is Venus, he's gotten the wrong opera.
Still I'm concerned with what kind of wine they'll be drinking at the " cocktail lounge with naff drinks ." Regards, Len :(
I had to look up "naff," which is unflattering British slang. You'd better watch out: They probably consider the Manhattan and the Brooklyn to be "naff" drinks, not at all like the late Queen Mum's proper Martini.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:12 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
I had to look up "naff," which is unflattering British slang. You'd better watch out: They probably consider the Manhattan and the Brooklyn to be "naff" drinks, not at all like the late Queen Mum's proper Martini.
I sure didn't know what naff is-thanks for the warning-I may very well skip this opera at the Met and only try to see it HD style-at least I'll save over $150 or more. Regards, Len :)

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sat Mar 26, 2016 4:41 pm

lennygoran wrote:Here's the London Times review
I have found several more reviews but none in English--here's one from Der Standard-I looked at a few others and what I'm gathering is that Rattle is great but the production is lousy--thanks, Gelb. :( Regards, Len

Translated by google


Berliner Philharmoniker and Sir Simon Rattle at the Easter Festival Baden-Baden only during Easter week are banished the Berliner Philharmoniker for a single musical theater production from the concert stage into the orchestra pit. Fifty years ago, therefore, its then chief conductor Herbert von Karajan founded the "Easter Festival". Four years ago the Berlin moved to its present conductor Sir Simon Rattle from Salzburg to Baden-Baden, in the opened in 1998 there Festspielhaus. It is the largest opera house in Germany and as the Easter Festival in Salzburg an almost exclusively privately operated enterprise. The elitist, exclusive character of the Easter Festival supports truly exceptional work as Richard Wagner's aesthetic boundaries often border love and death drama Tristan und Isolde, which however can not be easily implemented in scenic actions. Herbert von Karajan staged Tristan und Isolde at the Easter Festival in 1972 for his orchestra itself, a little smile at counter project to the symbolist interpretations in Bayreuth. Ocean waves, radar But even if now Simon Rattle musical forcefully introduced into Tristan's world in performance, it is questionable whether the music takes the scenic support. A radar screen, especially with sea waves and ship's bow is when platter Video Clip (Video: Bartek Macias) projected flickering on the curtain. One first lowers his eyes. Tristan and Isolde is a very dark night piece in the middle of the sea for director Mariusz Trelinski and stage designer Boris Kudlicka: the dark world of a modern warship full of brutal military and orden reception officers. Even Tristan wears a pistol and aimed toward a prisoner - probably Morold is meant. For women like Isolde and her bespectacled secretary Brangäne (Sarah Connolly) is as little space. The lovers meet secretly in the dark lobby of the vessel. This works occasionally as a clarification thoroughly, and the gloomy scene seems sometimes a little bit of Lars von Trier's film Melancholia to remember. But if only the sea waves and crowds are projected of birds in love noise of Tristan and Isolde, this is - in contrast to the ceaseless of tension and surprise Wagner's music - unpleasant banal. However, enter the Berlin Philharmonic and their conductor not the heady excesses of the music out, but controlled play hauntingly clear and open again and again downright existential abyss. Among the votes can compete against the waves of the orchestra particularly impressive Stuart Skelton; He made his debut as Tristan. Admirable changes his powerful voice even after four hours in soft lyrical sound! International sold well also Eva-Maria Westbroek caulked their huge game easily, although not quite as varied as its partner. Listen attentively and the resolute youth Kurnewal Michal Nagy and a calmer, clearer King Marke (sung by Stephen Milling). The Festspielhaus in Baden-Baden production could sell internationally well; the staging is shown at the opening of the season at the New York Met, also at the National Opera in Beijing and Warsaw, but without the Berliner Philharmoniker. The will finish the work in late March home concert without imaging on the podium of the Philharmonic. (Bernhard Doppler, 24/03/2016) - derstandard.at/2000033593160/Tristan-und-Isolde-Dunkles-Nachtstueck-mitten-auf-dem-Meer
Google Translate for Business:Google Translator Toolkit

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sat Mar 26, 2016 4:43 pm

A follow up-here's the German:

Regards, Len

Berliner Philharmoniker und Sir Simon Rattle bei den Osterfestspielen Baden-Baden Lediglich in der Osterwoche werden die Berliner Philharmoniker für eine einzige Musiktheaterproduktion vom Konzertpodium in den Orchestergraben verbannt. Vor fünfzig Jahren gründete deshalb ihr damaliger Chefdirigent Herbert von Karajan die "Osterfestspiele". Vor vier Jahren sind die Berliner mit ihrem jetzigen Leiter Sir Simon Rattle von Salzburg nach Baden-Baden umgezogen, in das 1998 dort eröffnete Festspielhaus. Es ist das größte Opernhaus Deutschlands und wie die Osterfestspiele in der Stadt Salzburg ein fast ausschließlich privatwirtschaftlich betriebenes Unternehmen. Den elitären, exklusiven Charakter der Osterfestspiele unterstützt sicherlich ein Ausnahmewerk wie Richard Wagners ästhetische Grenzen vielfach überschreitendes Liebes- und Todesdrama Tristan und Isolde, das sich allerdings nicht leicht in szenische Aktionen umsetzen lässt. Herbert von Karajan inszenierte Tristan und Isolde bei den Osterfestspielen 1972 für sein Orchester selbst, ein etwas belächelter Gegenentwurf zu den symbolistischen Deutungen in Bayreuth. Meereswellen, Radarschirm Doch auch wenn nun Simon Rattle musikalisch eindringlich im Vorspiel in Tristans Welt einführt, ist fraglich, ob die Musik die szenische Unterstützung braucht. Ein Radarschirm, vor allem mit Meereswellen und Schiffsbug, wird als platter Videoclip (Video: Bartek Macias) flimmernd auf den Vorhang projiziert. Man senkt zunächst den Blick. Tristan und Isolde ist für Regisseur Mariusz Trelinski und Bühnenbildner Boris Kudlicka ein sehr dunkles Nachtstück mitten auf dem Meer: die düstere Welt eines modernen Kriegsschiffes voller brutaler Militärs und ordenbesetzter Offiziere. Auch Tristan trägt eine Pistole und richtet einen Gefangenen hin – vermutlich ist Morold gemeint. Für Frauen wie Isolde und ihre bebrillte Sekretärin Brangäne (Sarah Conolly) ist da wenig Platz. Die Liebenden treffen sich heimlich in der finsteren Lobby des Schiffes. Das funktioniert zwar hin und wieder als Verdeutlichung durchaus, und die düstere Szenerie scheint bisweilen ein wenig an Lars von Triers Film Melancholia zu erinnern. Doch wenn im Liebesrausch von Tristan und Isolde nur Meereswellen und Scharen von Vögeln projiziert werden, ist dies – ganz im Gegensatz zur nie an Spannung und Überraschung nachlassenden Musik Wagners – unangenehm banal. Allerdings geben sich die Berliner Philharmoniker mit ihrem Dirigenten nicht den rauschhaften Exzessen der Musik hin, sondern spielen kontrolliert, betörend klar und eröffnen dabei immer wieder geradezu existenzielle Abgründe. Unter den Stimmen kann sich besonders eindrucksvoll Stuart Skelton gegenüber den Orchesterwogen behaupten; er debütierte als Tristan. Bewundernswert wechselt seine kräftige Stimme auch noch nach vier Stunden in weichen lyrischen Klang! International gut verkauft Auch Eva-Maria Westbroek stemmt ihre riesige Partie mühelos, wenngleich nicht ganz so abwechslungsreich wie ihr Partner. Aufhorchen lassen auch der resolute jugendliche Kurnewal von Michal Nagy und ein ruhiger, klarer König Marke (gesungen von Stephen Milling). Das Festspielhaus in Baden-Baden konnte die Produktion international gut verkaufen; die Inszenierung wird zur Eröffnung der Saison an der New Yorker Met gezeigt, auch an der Nationaloper in Peking und in Warschau, allerdings ohne die Berliner Philharmoniker. Die werden das Werk Ende März nach Hause bringen, konzertant ganz ohne Bebilderung auf dem Podium der Philharmonie. (Bernhard Doppler, 24.3.2016) - derstandard.at/2000033593160/Tristan-und-Isolde-Dunkles-Nachtstueck-mitten-auf-dem-Meer

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Mar 26, 2016 6:24 pm

Interesting that the Germans still use the Wade-Giles "Peking" instead of the Pinyin "Beijing," possibly because the word would have to be rendered "Beizhing" in German to be pronounced with approximate correctness.

Oh, you were expecting a translation of the substance of the article? This is more difficult. If John F or someone else doesn't get here first, give me a brief time, and I will only start at the point where the author makes his evaluation of the production.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sat Mar 26, 2016 7:19 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Oh, you were expecting a translation of the substance of the article? This is more difficult. If John F or someone else doesn't get here first, give me a brief time, and I will only start at the point where the author makes his evaluation of the production.
Thanks so much-take as much time as you need-I'm in no position or hurry to buy a ticket at this point. Regards, Len

PS-if you get a chance here are 2 more reviews:

1. Baden-Baden - Die Erwartungen waren hochgeschraubt: Zum Auftakt der Osterfestspiele 2016 gab es im Festspielhaus Baden-Baden eine Neuinszenierung von Richard Wagners "Tristan und Isolde".

Die Berliner Philharmoniker unter Sir Simon Rattle und international hoch gehandelte Solisten garantierten für die herausragende musikalische Qualität der Aufführung. Zu stemmen war ein solcher künstlerischer und finanzieller Kraftakt nur durch die Kooperation mit der Metropolitan Opera New York, der Polnischen Nationaloper Warschau und dem China National Centre for the Performing Arts Peking.

Wagners "Tristan" ist für Opernregisseure eine ständige Herausforderung. Die wesentlichen Elemente der Handlung werden nicht gezeigt, sondern erzählt. Wagner wollte mit der Geschichte von Liebessehnsucht und Liebestod musikdramatische Ekstase komponieren. Der Dichter und Operntexter Hugo von Hofmannsthal machte sich denn auch über das "Aufeinanderlosbrüllen zweier Geschöpfe in Liebesbrunst" lustig. Das Regieteam um den polnischen Regisseur Mariusz Trelinski verlegt die Handlung auf ein modernes Kriegsschiff. Tristan ist ein Marineoffizier, der vom Konflikt zwischen Liebessehnsucht und Pflichtbewusstsein zerrissen wird.

Bühnenbildner Boris Kudlicka überschüttet das Publikum mit gigantischen Video-Projektionen (Bartek Macias) und beeindruckenden Lichteffekten (Marc Heinz). Die Personenführung von Regisseur Mariusz Trelinski versagt aber an entscheidenden Punkten: Die große Liebesszene zwischen Tristan und Isolde im zweiten Akt gerät zum statischen "Rampensingen". Die erotische Ekstase kommt aus dem Orchestergraben. Und der Liebestod findet auf einem modernen Krankenbett inklusive "Tropf" statt: Tristan auf der Intensivstation.

Musikalische blieben hingegen kaum Wünsche offen. Wenn die Berliner Philharmoniker vom Konzertpodium in den Orchestergraben eines Opernhauses wechseln, ist das immer ein künstlerisches Ereignis. Und Sir Simon "zaubert"! Sein "Tristan" klingt ganz schlank, durchsichtig, fast wie französischer Impressionismus. Rattle liebt die dunklen Farben: Bassklarinette und Englisch Horn kommen wunderbar zur Geltung, und die legendäre Cellogruppe der Philharmoniker darf in satten Kantilenen schwelgen.

Eva-Maria Westbroek ist eine überzeugende Isolde mit ebenso sicherer wie warm klingender Höhe. Stuart Skelton bewältigt in seinem ersten Bühnentristan die Marathonpartie mit beeindruckender Kondition. Auch die anderen Solisten und der Philharmonia Chor Wien (Leitung: Walter Zeh) halten das hohe Niveau. Am Schluss: einhelliger Jubel durchsetzt mit leichten Buhs für das Inszenierungsteam.


2. Die globale Matrix der Nacht-Erlösten

TRISTAN UND ISOLDE
(Richard Wagner)

Besuch am
19. März 2016
(Premiere)

So wäre denn alle furchtbare Tragik des Lebens nur in dem Auseinanderliegen in Zeit und Raum zu finden: da aber Zeit und Raum nur unsre Anschauungsweisen sind, außerdem aber keine Realität haben, so müsste dem vollkommen Hellsehenden auch der höchste tragische Schmerz nur aus dem Irrtum des Individuums erklärt werden können: ich glaube, es ist so!“ Das schreibt Richard Wagner 1860 seiner Gönnerin und heimlichen Liebe Mathilde Wesendonck. Seit den 1850-er Jahren hat sich der Komponist mit dem Buddhismus befasst, wesentlich in der Auseinandersetzung mit Arthur Schopenhauer. Wagner berauschte sich an der Idee der Aufhebung des Ich. Von der „Einheit alles Lebenden“, vom Eins-sein und der Ganzheit, von der Überwindung des Gegensatzes von Diesseits und Jenseits. Tristan und Isolde, 1865 in München uraufgeführt, wird zum Vorboten einer radikal „Neuen Musik“, für den Komponisten Grenzüberschreitung und Vollendung zugleich.

2011 richtet Willy Decker bei der Ruhrtriennale seine Inszenierung von Wagners Gesamtkunstwerk strikt an der buddhistisch-spirituellen Sichtweise aus. Zusammen mit dem Bühnenbild Wolfgang Gussmanns erzeugt er in der Bochumer Jahrhunderthalle ein Regie-und Raumerlebnis, das als Glücksfall in Erinnerung bleibt. 1983, um an ein zweites Beispiel für ein originäres Regiekonzept zu erinnern, entwickelt der Regisseur Jean-Pierre Ponnelle für Bayreuth eine Deutung des auf keltischen Sagen beruhenden Liebes- und Erlösungsdramas, das einige Kritiker damals in den Rang eines Tristan für die Ewigkeit heben. Isoldes Ankunft im dritten Aufzug vor der Burg Kareol erlebt der totgeweihte bretonische Ritter als Fiebertraum. Ihre Blicke, der Schlüssel der Verwandlung von Hass in Liebe, das Geheimnis des Verschmelzens von Todes- und Erlösungssehnsucht, treffen sich nicht, nicht ein einziges Mal.


Zumal mit Regisseur Mariusz Treliński eine Koryphäe an die Oos geholt worden ist, deren bisherige Arbeiten für das Theater stark von Filmtechniken inspiriert sind und deren Bühnenrealisierung von Tschaikowskys Jolanthe 2009 in Baden-Baden Furore machte. Die Frage stellen heißt, die Produktions- und Marketingdimension dieser Neuinszenierung in den Blick zu nehmen. Nach den vier Baden-Badener Aufführungen wird die Koproduktion mit der Metropolitan Opera New York, dem Polnischen Nationaltheater Warschau und dem China National Centre for the Performing Arts Peking auch in diesen Musiktheatern zu sehen sein. Verlangt ist demnach eine Matrix des Vermittelns und Interpretierens, die ihr Publikum auf drei Erdteilen finden, gleichsam global funktionieren muss.
Foto © Monika Rittershaus

Ob es solches Konzept ausgerechnet für das Musikdrama der exzessiven Kühnheit geben kann, mag offen bleiben. Treliński unternimmt auch keinerlei Versuch in dieser Richtung. Wenige szenische Ausnahmen fallen da kaum ins Gewicht – etwa die im Schluss des zweiten Aufzugs, als Tristan sich die tödliche Wunde selbst beibringt. In Wagners Dichtung lässt er seine Waffe sinken und Melot den Schwertstreich vollführen. Oder jene im dritten Aufzug, als der Regisseur mit dem jungen Tristan eine zusätzliche Figur einführt. Das Kind wendet sich dem siechen, in einem Hospitalbett ruhenden Tristan zu, was wohl als Geste zu verstehen ist, aber letztlich eine vage Chiffre bleibt. Vielmehr konzentriert und verlässt sich Trelinski mit seinem Inszenierungsteam konsequent auf die Zeichen- und Bilderwelt, die sich aus der tragenden Idee, der Verlagerung des Geschehens auf ein Kriegsschiff, mit wachsender Wirkungsgewalt entwickelt. Die Protagonisten, Tristan und Isolde nicht zuletzt, sind Exponenten einer Welt, in der Verrat und Mord, Brutalität und Erniedrigung selbstverständliche gesellschaftliche Spielregeln sind. Erst durch die radikale Umwertung dieser Werte, die Absage an die Welt und die Sehnsucht nach völliger Loslösung von derselben, das Verlöschen des Liebespaares in der ewigen Nacht der Weltentrückung wird die Utopie einer humanen Alternative denkbar.

Konsequent im Wagnerschen Sinne dominiert über alle drei Baden-Badener Aufzüge hinweg die Nacht, was dem Publikum ein höheres Maß an Konzentration und Disziplin als üblich abverlangt. Weitgehend in schwärzestes Dunkel ist Boris Kudličkas Bühnenbild getaucht, ein Organismus von unterschiedlichen Schiffsräumen, Treppenauf- und -abgängen mit Isoldes Kajüte im Zentrum. Die Video-Projektionen von Bartek Macias schaffen allerlei Raumeffekte, per split screen gar die Illusion der Gleichzeitigkeit unterschiedlicher Handlungen. Meereswogen symbolisieren die Gewalt der Natur, Möwenschwärme die Vergeblichkeit des Tun und Trachtens der Menschen. Taschenlampen der Mannschaften, die König Marke auf seinem Trip begleiten, wirken bereits wie richtige Lichtquellen. Schwarz ist der Prospekt auf dem sich zum Rausch des Vorspiels ein Radarbild auftut, in dessen Kern mit schemenhaften Video-Sequenzen die Kindheitsgeschichte Tristans erzählt wird. Den Radarschirm gibt es dann auch auf der Brücke des Schiffes. Dort führt Tristan, dem der Kostümbildner Marek Adamski eine Offiziersuniform auf den Leib geschneidert hat, das Kommando. Rau ist der Ton, in dem auch Isolde Untergebene anfährt. Sogar ein Revolverschuss ist zu hören, der einem Gefangenen an Bord gilt. Eine Reminiszenz an die Ermordung Morolds?

Wagner nennt sein Werk eine „Handlung“. Diese freilich existiert nicht oder nur kaum an sich, sondern in der narrativen Verbindung von Text und Klang. Von seinem Lager blickt er her – … er sah mir in die Augen … Isoldes Erinnerung an diesen Blitzschlag der Liebe, diese Schlüsselstelle der Selbstfindung des Paares, verlangt nach einer adäquaten Gestaltung, als würde der Blick durch Gesang gegenständlich. Trelińskis Personenregie verfehlt diesen großen Moment, der allein durch die orchestrale Wiedergabe des Blick-Motivs eingefangen wird. Leider kein Einzelfall, wie auch das befremdliche Spiel von Distanz und Nähe im Sehnsuchtsduett des zweiten Aufzugs O sink hernieder, Nacht der Liebe erweist. Der Regisseur, hier ganz dem Film nahe, lässt die Liebenden diese ihre Nacht in einem Kontrollraum beginnen und in der Cocktailbar des Schiffes enden. Bilder müssen auch bei Tristans Wandlung ins Transzendentale herhalten. So erreicht er auf der symbolischen Wanderung durch seine Biographie die vom Feuer zerstörte Holzhütte seiner einstigen Eltern.

Unter Daniel Barenboim haben die Berliner Philharmoniker vor rund 20 Jahren schon einmal einen Tristan in bestechender Qualität auf Tonträger eingespielt. Unter Rattle, ihrem noch agierenden Chefdirigenten, beweisen die Musiker einmal mehr ihre hohe Qualität und Kompetenz, Wagners orgiastische Partitur als sinfonisches Ereignis zu interpretieren. Dabei sind die Streicher schlicht Weltklasse. Aus dem Orchestergraben des Festspielhauses erklingen all die grandiosen hellen Motive und tiefschwarzen, in der Bassklarinette kulminierenden Farben, die dieses Werk der genial-kühnen Chromatik in seinen Rang des Ausnahmephänomens katapultiert haben. Rattle, eher zurückhaltend dirigierend, wie ein Diener an der Kunst, gelingen ganz besonders die lyrischen Passagen, die Pastelltöne, die innigen Verwandlungsmusiken. So werden die 42 unbegleiteten Takte der „traurigen Weise“, die das Englisch Horn dem Hirten angedeihen lässt, allein schon zu einem Erlebnis, das den Atem stocken lässt. Einschränkungen? Ja, auch die gibt es in Maßen, sind wie beim Rosenkavalier im vergangenen Jahr nicht zu überhören. Die Wucht der Philharmoniker erreicht bisweilen ein Maß, das die ohnehin an der Höchstgrenze der menschlichen Stimme agierenden Sänger zu zermalmen droht. Exzessiv ist ja schon Wagners Musiksprache; damit könnte es schon eigentlich sein Bewenden haben.

Große Aufmerksamkeit zieht Stuart Skelton auf sich, der sein Bühnendebüt in der Rolle des Tristans gibt. Keine Frage, der bereits in zahlreichen großen Wagnerpartien bis hin zum Siegmund bewährte australische Tenor gibt der monströsen Figur des „Orpheus des Todes“, wie Kesting sie nennt, souverän und kraftvoll Gestalt und Stimme. Er singt schön und phrasiert großartig, deklamiert nicht wie einst René Kollo und vermeidet die baritonale Tessitura mancher großer Tristan-Sänger der Vergangenheit wie Lauritz Melchior. Nur – warum so restriktiv im Spiel, in der Mimik? Dieser Tristan durch- und erlebt auf seiner Tag-Nacht-Wanderung doch das ganze Gefühlskarussell, das dem Menschen zur Wirklichkeit und dem Dichter zur Sprache werden kann. Skelton liefert hingegen schlicht ab, was sich auch im etwas verhaltenden Beifall des Publikums nach dem Schlussvorhang manifestiert.

Uneingeschränkt hingegen erntet diesen Eva-Maria Westbroek, die unter dem Vorzeichen der Bayreuther Festspiele sowohl durch ihre Isolde in der Marthaler-Inszenierung wie auch durch ihre Absage im Vorjahr zum Begriff geworden ist. Ihr Hang zum vokalen Vibrato scheint sich in den letzten Jahren verfestigt zu haben. Davon abgesehen, zeigt sich die Niederländerin höhensicher, ausdrucksstark und der Entrückung fähig. Ihre Apotheose der Verschmelzung von Eros und Thanatos im Schluss, fälschlicherweise als Isoldes Liebestod bekannt, macht diesen Baden-Badener Abend auf Zeit erinnerlich. Dazu könnten im Übrigen auch Stephen Milling als König Marke und ganz besonders der prächtige Michael Nagy als Kurwenal beitragen. Beide erreichen durch großes vokales Engagement hohes Wagner-Niveau. Sarah Connolly als Brangäne und Roman Sadnik als Melot komplettieren zusammen mit Thomas Ebenstein, der einen jungen Seemann und einen Hirten darstellt, ein Sängerensemble, auf das man sich in New York, Warschau und Peking freuen kann. Dass der Philharmonia-Chor Wien in der Einstudierung von Walter Zeh zu den besten seiner Spezies gehört, bleibe dabei nicht unerwähnt, weil einmal mehr famos bewiesen.

„Wie es fassen…“, stößt Tristan im Liebesduett des zweiten Aufzugs hervor. Das Premierenpublikum hat, wäre dies die resümierende Frage, überwiegend Jubel und Emphase zur Antwort, ganz besonders für die Philharmoniker und ihren beseelt lächelnden Dirigenten. Die Fraktion der Buh-Rufer schafft es auch nach fünf Stunden, sich hinreichend Gehör zu verschaffen – speziell dann, wenn sich das Regieteam zeigt. Kestings Bonmot bekommt so noch eine andere Bedeutung. Draußen, jetzt weit nach 23 Uhr, herrscht natürliche Dunkelheit. Die angemessene Sphäre, der ewigen Melodie nachzusinnen, fern dem wogenden Schwall, wie Isolde singt, „höchste Lust“. Die Matrix des Eins-Seins wenigstens mit der Musik.

Ralf Siepmann

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Mar 26, 2016 9:13 pm

Keine Chance.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sat Apr 02, 2016 7:05 am

jbuck919 wrote:Keine Chance.
I finally found another review in English-it heaps lots of praise on the Tristan but I'm skeptical:

Tristan und Isolde in Baden-Baden
© Monika Rittershaus

What a treat it is to have the mighty Berliner Philharmoniker in the pit of the Festival House of Baden-Baden for the new production of Tristan und Isolde by the Polish director Mariusz Treliński. Enhanced by the excellent acoustics of the house, with the orchestra deep in the lowered pit, it was as though the sound was coming from nowhere and everywhere. Under Sir Simon Rattle’s meticulous, expansive and unhurried direction, the strings played waves of lush melodies with every note clearly articulated. The exhilarating horn calls in the beginning of Act II, and the plaintive, haunting woodwinds at the climaxes of Acts II and III, were all somehow tempered so as not to disrupt the continuous music of unresolved longing that changed the course of Western music and art from the opera’s 1865 première. Sir Simon took time to build the momentum of the prelude, with prolonged pauses starting with an almost tentative opening of the famous Tristan chord. And yet the hours just flew by and the final note by an oboe to resolve the chord seemed to arrive too soon to wake us from a journey through the dream world of Tristan. It was not a surprise that after the singers took their bows, it was the conductor and his orchestra that received the most tumultuous ovation at the end of the evening.


The production is indeed conceived as the journey of Tristan, a commander of a battleship bringing a captive Isolde back to his uncle. Nautical images predominated; each act began with a video image of a large circle which became the compass of a ship, perhaps of a life, an endless cycle of wandering. During the prelude, following an image of a large ship and waves, a house in the forest appeared with a young boy. Act I set was a cross section of a claustrophobic ship, with a deck on top, Isolde’s cabin at the second level, and Tristan’s larger quarters at the bottom. Act II had Isolde and Brangane on the ship's deck, although the rest of the act took place in what appeared to be a living room. In Tristan’s hospital room in Act III, the images of the video in the prelude returned as a house appeared on stage with a child as part of Tristan’s delirium.



As if to emphasize that perhaps the whole drama was in Tristan's imagination, preferring darkness and death to daylight and life, the stage was kept dark most of the time, with occasional and effective lighting such as the northern light as the lovers met in Act II on the ship's deck. The notion of love/death was on the mind of both Tristan and Isolde even during their love duet, sung with the lovers not in an embrace but standing separately. In departure from the plot, both lovers committed suicide, with Tristan stabbing himself at the end of Act II and Isolde slitting her wrists as she prepared to sing the “Liebestod”. And yet the lovers were finally united in death, sitting on a bench, their bodies touching. The final image was again that of the waves as the ocean journey of life was completed.

Stuart Skelton was an accomplished Tristan equipped with both vocal and physical stamina. His lyrical voice had baritone-like heft coupled with hints of sweetness. He effectively conveyed the sense of Tristan’s inner conflict in the crucial Act II ending. Eva-Maria Westbroek was an excellent Isolde, with her warm, ringing middle register making her a glamorous and desirable woman. Sir Simon’s orchestra never overpowered her as she excelled in Isolde’s curse; her farewell to the world began like a whisper before reaching a powerful climax. With two strong principals, the Act II love duet was a real pleasure as their voices intertwined and rose thrillingly to their heights.
Eva-Maria Westbroek (Isolde) and Stuart Skelton (Tristan) © Monika Rittershaus
Eva-Maria Westbroek (Isolde) and Stuart Skelton (Tristan)
© Monika Rittershaus

Sarah Connolly brought her diverse singing experience to the role of Isolde’s confidante Brangane. She sang clearly and cleanly, and her Act II warnings to the lovers, especially the second time when the video showed the lovers’ world expanding from the forest, to the earth, to the stars and universe, rode beautifully above the orchestra. It was a pleasure to hear Tristan’s aide and friend Kurwenal sung by such a strong baritone as Michael Nagy, who combined his attractive and penetrating voice with good acting skills to create a sympathetic character; his farewell to Tristan was heartbreaking. Stephen Milling was a stern, but ultimately mournful, King Marke with a deep, sonorous bass. Smaller roles were well cast, and contributed to this deeply rewarding experience.

https://bachtrack.com/review-tristan-is ... march-2016

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:35 am

jbuck919 wrote: As usual, I wouldn't recommend jumping to conclusions about a production based on two stills.
Now some reviews are hitting the internet in English and one review included this material which really alarms me-I think I'll be passing on this Tristan live and save the expense of two $100 tickets and also the expense of a Manhattan hotel room and just maybe see it HD style if at all. Regards, Len :(


Mariusz Trelinski "I came to the opera from the outside. I had two objectives: to destroy its inherent sentimentalism and the kitsch aesthetics that dominated it, and above all to open this creative form to contemporary times, to give it the dynamic and temperature of our times. I love opera as a genre but I hate what has happened to it. As long as it remains deaf to what is happening around us, opera remains a museum piece. There is not a trace of contemporary aesthetic currents within it, i.e. no installations, no truly modern painting or architecture. The beauty of traditional operatic music combined with contemporary aesthetics is a truly electrifying mix."

http://vlaamswagnergenootschap.blogspot ... n-und.html

John F
Posts: 21076
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by John F » Sun Apr 03, 2016 9:27 am

If Trelinski really believes that "Tristan und Isolde" is sentimental and its esthetics are kitsch - esthetics which, after all, decisively changed the course of classical music forever, leading the way for one thing to "Wozzeck" and "Moses und Aron" - then he's definitely not the right man for that job. But like so many directors nowadays, he's probably just talking about the words and ignoring the music.
John Francis

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Sun Apr 03, 2016 4:04 pm

John F wrote:If Trelinski really believes that "Tristan und Isolde" is sentimental and its esthetics are kitsch - esthetics which, after all, decisively changed the course of classical music forever, leading the way for one thing to "Wozzeck" and "Moses und Aron" - then he's definitely not the right man for that job. But like so many directors nowadays, he's probably just talking about the words and ignoring the music.
Thanks, everyone's raving about Rattle-Trelinski seems to be getting mixed reviews-I may do the HD but right now can't see myself spending the money for Met tickets. Regards, Len

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Tue Apr 26, 2016 5:57 am

lennygoran wrote:Rattle-Trelinski seems to be getting mixed reviews-I may do the HD but right now can't see myself spending the money for Met tickets. Regards, Len
I just found another very favorable review but looking at the photos I'm just not convinced. Regards, Len

23 Apr 2016
Simon Rattle conducts Tristan und Isolde

New Co-Production Tristan und Isolde with Metropolitan: Simon Rattle and Westbroek electrify Treliński’s Opera-Noir.

A review by David Pinedo


In a letter to Mathilde Wesendonck, Richard Wagner writes about Tristan und Isolde: “I would call my art....the art of transformation. The masterful point in this work is certainly the great scene of the second act”. This sums up Mariusz Treliński’s technically mind blowing Tristan und Isolde. The stage in the first act transforms through highly complex engineering, while the second act was one of the most dazzling, Romantic opera settings I have witnessed. With Simon Rattle at the helm of his Berliner Philharmoniker, the performance resulted in a superlatively transformative experience; however much exhausting in Act III, you would not want to miss it for the world. And with the Herculean Eva-Maria Westbroek as Isolde, the performance in Baden-Baden became an unforgettable memory.


Video projections of a ship at sea during a storm complemented the Prelude in its metaphor for Tristan and Isolde’s tempestuous emotions. At the same time, that ship could have been Captain Rattle’s Berliner. From the opening, the BPO played with astounding intensity. I immediately realised I was in for a very privileged journey.

As Maestro Rattle unfolded Wagner’s luscious tapestry, he ceaselessly generated a resounding depth from his strings. Wagner’s swooning romance and erotic tension overflowed in full force. Dense in texture the leitmotifs resonated deeply. Sir Simon sustains such captivating suspense without interruption that as a listener it was impossible not to feel included in his musical universe. And one cannot forget the men of the Philharmonia Chorus Vienna, who from the pit jolted the piece with their generous energy. In addition, the Festspielhaus greatly amplified the level of musical detail and intensity with its transparent and enveloping acoustics.


As the first act opens, we see a highly complex staging of a military naval vessel. Dark metallic colours dominate. What little light there is, reflects into the audience. The set by Boris Kudlička and Marc Heinz’s lighting impressed as through complex engineering the stage switched its focus: covering three floors, the deck, the stairwell, the Captain’s quarter’s below, and Isolde’s room at the centre.

The stage functioned like a comic book panel that was each time covered and lit from different angles. Through spy footage, Bartek Macias’s videos of Isolde from different angles projected her on the ever changing stage. Although it sounds like too much, this might be true in the end, but for now the energetic dynamics on stage enthralled.

From the bat Ms. Westbroek dazzled dominating the stage: her voice full of violent distrust, as Treliński makes his Isolde a femme fatale before she has fallen in love. The Dutch Diva convinced both in that capacity, as well later as the enamored Isolde later, when her vibrato conquered all.


In Act I, dressed in black, she smokes, drinks, and even slaps Melot, played deviously by Roman Sadnik. Sarah Connolly transformed for Braegene into a persuasive secretary (spectacles and all) highly involved, with a dark but affectionate tone that contrasted Ms. Westbroek in the best of ways. Together they created a sound to behold.

The second act was one of the most memorable opera moments I have had. On stage we see the ship‘s wheelhouse that throughout rotates as the action takes place, eventually establishing the setting for the love duet. But for the Northern Lights morphing around behind the two lovers, all is darkness. The flux of those green lights certainly symbolized the transformative nature of this experience and gave this production a feeling cosmic grandeur.

As Tristan and Isolde breathed in darkness with the Northern Lights in the background, the Berliner’s music gained the foreground and Skelton and Westbroek launched into a captivating “O sink hernieder, Nacht der Liebe”. While Mr Skelton never reached the voluminous vocal heights of Ms. Westbroek, he compensated with authentic sensitivity, including even some glass eyed moments. I imagine Wagner would have loved to witness such indulgent and thoughtfully atmospheric moods for his Gesamtkunstwerk.

Each excessively budgeted production reaches a tipping point. At some point it all becomes too much to absorb. Here it occurred in the final act, when everything turns strangely static. The glaring metallic reflections tortured the audience’s vista; as if trying to keep you awake, but with agitating results.

A sullen ambience emerged and a lone hospital bed made for Kurnewal and Tristan’s interaction. As a brotherly Kurnewal, Michael Nagy commanded the stage, even vocally upstaging Mr. Skelton. Still no matter the musical excellence, a nagging dread permeated the first part of the third act.

With the memory of young Tristan in a broken down home in a projection of a forest, Treliński’s applied psychology felt unnecessary and the video excessively taxed the experience of the third act. Perhaps he wanted to slow down the momentum before Isolde’s Liebestod, but the pause in momentum made it quickly clear how consuming the first two acts had already been.

When she returned, Eva-Maria impressively reignited the musical momentum. For “Das Wiedersehen” she stormed onto the stage creating such an impetus with her electrifying voice. Even more impressively, she brought back the preceding intoxication. Her “Liebestod” closed the evening with such persuasive power, leaving me exhausted, drained, but profoundly changed by the overall experience.

The audience responded with a mighty applause and bravas for Ms Westbroek and Sir Simon, while expected boos met Treliński and his team (this is Tristan und Isolde after all). The staging ended up a bit too extravagant with all its excessive sensory stimulation, but the rendition was superlative in its musical execution. This co-production with Shanghai and Warsaw opera houses, opens the Met’s new season in September...also with Simon Rattle at the helm.


http://www.operatoday.com/content/2016/ ... tle_co.php

maestrob
Posts: 6960
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by maestrob » Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:00 pm

Len: I would go for the music, and get partial-view seats so I wouldn't have to stare at the sets & costumes......

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:13 pm

maestrob wrote:Len: I would go for the music, and get partial-view seats so I wouldn't have to stare at the sets & costumes......
Brian you could be right but I really hate doing that. Regards, Len

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17669
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Apr 26, 2016 11:10 pm

Wagner is 'naff', Rattle is 'well naff', if you disagree then you can 'naff off'.

:wink: :wink: :wink:
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:33 am

Chalkperson wrote:Wagner is 'naff', Rattle is 'well naff', if you disagree then you can 'naff off'.

:wink: :wink: :wink:
Thanks, a new word:
naff1
naf/
verbBritishinformal
verb: naff; 3rd person present: naffs; past tense: naffed; past participle: naffed; gerund or present participle: naffing

go away.
"she told press photographers to naff off"

Regards, Len :lol:

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17669
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by Chalkperson » Wed Apr 27, 2016 3:41 pm

lennygoran wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:Wagner is 'naff', Rattle is 'well naff', if you disagree then you can 'naff off'.

:wink: :wink: :wink:
Thanks, a new word:
naff1
naf/
verbBritishinformal
verb: naff; 3rd person present: naffs; past tense: naffed; past participle: naffed; gerund or present participle: naffing

go away.
"she told press photographers to naff off"

Regards, Len :lol:
It also means 'average' 'not very good' etc
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Thu Apr 28, 2016 5:50 am

Chalkperson wrote: It also means 'average' 'not very good' etc
Thanks, I think i have eNAFF information now on it. Regards, Len [running off] :lol:

lennygoran
Posts: 15883
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Tristan or Pinkerton

Post by lennygoran » Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:35 am

maestrob wrote:Len: I would go for the music, and get partial-view seats so I wouldn't have to stare at the sets & costumes......
Brian a followup-just listened to this interview:

It suggests it's Tristan with a Touch of Busby Berkeley ! Regards, Len


It starts at around 17:40 minutes.

Frances Morris, director of Tate Modern, Anish Kapoor on designing at the ENO, Embrace of the Serpent review

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07djvbw

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: slofstra and 10 guests