What are you listening to?

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:35 am

Dalibor wrote:Paul Hindemith: "Mathis Der Maler" (hope the spelling is right)
The complete opera, or the three-movement Symphony?

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Dalibor
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:37 am

Post by Dalibor » Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:25 pm

karlhenning: The symhpony in three parts. And it was only the first movement I realy listened to - didn't quite get the other two, sounded like bland variations

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:31 pm

Oh, dear! "Bland" is about the last adjective in the world I should apply to that third movement!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Dalibor
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:37 am

Post by Dalibor » Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:50 pm

Oh, I actually completely skipped that third movement... I'll check it out later, thanks for suggestion. It's the second that left me bored

PJME
Posts: 780
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:37 am

hindemith

Post by PJME » Tue Nov 07, 2006 1:34 pm

Hi Dalibor, do listen to the whole symphony again! (less than 30 minutes). The last movement is absolutely terrific! And I find the slow movement ( Grablegung!) very moving....
But indeed, the Engelkonzert is ravishing. That hushed opening is magical and brings me right into heaven.
Do look up Mathias Grunewald ( and Breughel and Jeroen Bosch...) on the internet...here is a sample:

Image
or visit : http://www.musee-unterlinden.com/franca ... index.html

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Re: hindemith

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 1:44 pm

PJME wrote:Hi Dalibor, do listen to the whole symphony again! (less than 30 minutes). The last movement is absolutely terrific! And I find the slow movement ( Grablegung!) very moving....
Hear, hear!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 1:47 pm

Honegger
Symphonies Nos. 2, pour cordes, & 5, Di tre re
Bavarian Radio Symphony / Dutoit


Image
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Wallingford
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:04 pm

Tonight, I plan on listening to that great Richard Strauss opera, Fire Snot.

Just as soon as I'm done with Brahms' Song Of The Parson.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:10 pm

Wallingford wrote:Tonight, I plan on listening to that great Richard Strauss opera, Fire Snot.
"It's Hell on a Handkerchief!" -- Variety
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

PJME
Posts: 780
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:37 am

Post by PJME » Tue Nov 07, 2006 5:39 pm

Roger Session's 2nd symphony (1944) - great recording of an excellent work : San francisco Symphony / Herbert Blomstedt.
and to end the evening
Billy Eidi performing Déodat de Séverac : Les muletiers devant le Christ de LLivia (from Cerdana)

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9816
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 07, 2006 7:55 pm

Dmitri Dmitriyevich
Symphony No. 10, Opus 93
Phila / Janssons


Fantastic!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:36 pm

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 Sinopoli/Philharmonia

bOrbOt
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 4:53 am

Post by bOrbOt » Wed Nov 08, 2006 1:15 am

Sibelius - Symphony No.3

Kurt Sanderling/Berlin Symphony Orchestra :)

hautbois
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 6:59 am
Location: East Malaysia

Post by hautbois » Wed Nov 08, 2006 2:54 am

Beethoven Symphony No.3 "Eroica" Op.55 , Overture Leonore III Op.72 , Overture Creatures of Prometheus Op.43.

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Chamber Orchestra of Europe. (elatus)

Wanderer
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 4:20 am

Post by Wanderer » Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:03 am

Medtner: Sonata Minacciosa (Hamelin).

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.2 (Demidenko/London Philharmonic/Lazarev).

Rossini: Overtures (Chamber Orchestra of Europe/Abbado).

Eetu Pellonpää
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 4:31 pm

Post by Eetu Pellonpää » Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:57 am

I'm just starting to listen Henry Purcell's "King Arthur".

EDIT: I'm not very experienced in the classical music field, but this sounds quite much like G.F.Händel's work, like the 3rd act overture. Some very beautiful song sequences here, but as a complete work there are also bit boring parts here?

If anybody could suggest me some shorter vocal works of Purcell I would be very grateful! :D (or some great arias from his operas f.ex.)
Last edited by Eetu Pellonpää on Wed Nov 08, 2006 7:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

hautbois
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 6:59 am
Location: East Malaysia

Post by hautbois » Wed Nov 08, 2006 6:53 am

Wanderer wrote:Rossini: Overtures (Chamber Orchestra of Europe/Abbado).
Beautiful recording! Superb contrasts in dynamics that blew me away.

val
Posts: 1039
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 5:46 am
Location: Lisbon

Post by val » Wed Nov 08, 2006 7:49 am

BEETHOVEN: Sonatas opus 28, 31/1 to 3, 49 1/2, 53 and 54, by Friedrich Gulda.

To me, the best versions I ever heard of the opus 31/3, 54 and the little sonatas opus 49.
The opus 31/2 is one of the best, with the ones of Brendel and Backhaus.

The opus 28 is good but far from Kempff, Backhaus, Gelber or even Brendel (in the first movement).
The opus 31/1 is a little inferior to my memories (I had this set many years ago in LP).

The worst moment is the opus 53, changed, almost sadically, in a sort of Clementi's Sonatina. Gulda always had this moments of strange humour.

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Wed Nov 08, 2006 7:56 am

Rachmaninov Les Vêpres Op. 37 Svechnikov/Choeur National de L'U.R.S.S. (1965)

Wanderer
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 4:20 am

Post by Wanderer » Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:10 pm

ImageImage

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:09 pm

Beethoven Variations for Piano Op. 34, 35, and 76 Richter

and on the same disc:

Schumann Noveletten Op.21 Nos. 2, 4, and 8 Richter

CharmNewton
Posts: 1974
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:10 pm

Post by CharmNewton » Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:44 pm

Eetu Pellonpää wrote:I'm just starting to listen Henry Purcell's "King Arthur".

EDIT: I'm not very experienced in the classical music field, but this sounds quite much like G.F.Händel's work, like the 3rd act overture. Some very beautiful song sequences here, but as a complete work there are also bit boring parts here?

If anybody could suggest me some shorter vocal works of Purcell I would be very grateful! :D (or some great arias from his operas f.ex.)
The Hyperion label has recorded a good deal of Purcell's instrumental and vocal music. Besides anthems, there are songs, incidental msuic for plays and solo keyboard works. A particular favorite of mine is the Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary as arranged by Thurston Dart on an old Angel LP (i'd love to see that recording on CD). There are a number of recordings of this music and all differ slightly in what is included. Of more modern recordings, I also like Gardiner's on Erato.

John

gperkins151
Posts: 417
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:21 pm
Location: NYC

Post by gperkins151 » Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:00 am

Bogey wrote:Beethoven Variations for Piano Op. 34, 35, and 76 Richter

and on the same disc:

Schumann Noveletten Op.21 Nos. 2, 4, and 8 Richter

Hey, brother! (its G e o r g e)

So what do you think?
George

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:12 am

gperkins151 wrote:
Bogey wrote:Beethoven Variations for Piano Op. 34, 35, and 76 Richter

and on the same disc:

Schumann Noveletten Op.21 Nos. 2, 4, and 8 Richter

Hey, brother! (its G e o r g e)

So what do you think?
When I put it on for its "maiden voyage" last night, my wife just closed her eyes and gave a positive "sigh". Simply beautiful.

gperkins151
Posts: 417
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:21 pm
Location: NYC

Post by gperkins151 » Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:15 am

Bogey wrote:
gperkins151 wrote:
Bogey wrote:Beethoven When I put it on for its "maiden voyage" last night, my wife just closed her eyes and gave a positive "sigh". Simply beautiful.
As you know, I had Richter's Eroica from another source. I think its time I crack open the CD you have for a spin.

:D
George

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Thu Nov 09, 2006 11:44 pm

Beethoven Piano Trios Op. 1 Nos 1 and 2 and WoO 39 Beaux Arts Trio

J Nguyen
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:14 am
Location: Orange County

Post by J Nguyen » Fri Nov 10, 2006 1:06 am

Grace Williams Fantasia on Welsh Nursery Tunes
London Symphony Orchestra

Dalibor
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:37 am

Post by Dalibor » Fri Nov 10, 2006 1:26 am

Schumann: Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra in A minor (Op. 129)

Another inspired mess - seems that is what you can expect from him (this is my second Schumann expirience, the first being symphony no.1)

Eetu Pellonpää
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 4:31 pm

Post by Eetu Pellonpää » Fri Nov 10, 2006 3:07 am

Thank you CharmNewton for your suggestions! I try to hunt down some of Purcell's anthems.

Just starting C.W.Gluck's "Alceste", and it sounds very promising!

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:08 am

Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki

DavidRoss
Posts: 3384
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 7:05 am
Location: Northern California

Post by DavidRoss » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:28 am

Bogey wrote:Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki
Ditto!
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

moldyoldie
Posts: 588
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:51 pm
Location: Motown, USA

Post by moldyoldie » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:39 am

Bogey wrote:Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki
Please let me/us know what you think of it; I've been considering purchase. Actually, I'm looking for the "perfect" Sibelius 3rd Symphony, which is the pairing on that CD, as well as a "different" 5th from my Panula, Sargent, Salonen (yuck!), Bernstein/Vienna, and Davis/LSO Live. (Really like the Panula and Sargent.) I've read Segerstam's recording described as "lush and expansive".

Currently listening to the interminable, nearly 100-minute Gliere Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murametz" by Farberman/RPO on Unicorn; trying again to decide if I really like it or if it should be sacrificed for shelf space. The first hour makes for good background music, if you like a consistent drone of romantic, near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of strings.

I realize the symphony has a "program", but it might work better as a silent movie soundtrack.
Last edited by moldyoldie on Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:29 am, edited 2 times in total.

hautbois
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 6:59 am
Location: East Malaysia

Post by hautbois » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:25 am

Schubert Symphonies No. 2 & 6

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Teldec)

When is Schubert's 250 coming? :twisted: Truly awesome music and i can't believe that i am saying this despite being 19!

CharmNewton
Posts: 1974
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:10 pm

Post by CharmNewton » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:48 am

hautbois wrote:Schubert Symphonies No. 2 & 6

When is Schubert's 250 coming? :twisted:
2047 (But Schubert 200 will be rolling around in 2028.) :)

John

johnQpublic
Posts: 1981
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 3:00 pm

Post by johnQpublic » Fri Nov 10, 2006 12:27 pm

This just in:

Image

J Nguyen
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:14 am
Location: Orange County

Post by J Nguyen » Fri Nov 10, 2006 1:35 pm

Elgar- Enigma Variations
Monteux, London Symphony Orchestra

jserraglio
Posts: 6480
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:25 pm

Image

J Nguyen
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:14 am
Location: Orange County

Post by J Nguyen » Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:51 pm

Schnittke- Symphony No.2 "St.Florian"
Segerstam, Royal Stockholm Orchestra, Mikaeli Chamber Choir

bOrbOt
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 4:53 am

Post by bOrbOt » Fri Nov 10, 2006 8:31 pm

Schubert - String Quartet No.1

Melos Quartet

Bogey
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:19 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Bogey » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:12 pm

moldyoldie wrote:
Bogey wrote:Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki
Please let me/us know what you think of it; I've been considering purchase. Actually, I'm looking for the "perfect" Sibelius 3rd Symphony, which is the pairing on that CD, as well as a "different" 5th from my Panula, Sargent, Salonen (yuck!), Bernstein/Vienna, and Davis/LSO Live. (Really like the Panula and Sargent.) I've read Segerstam's recording described as "lush and expansive".
I am fortunate enough to have the Segerstam set and listened to the 3rd as well today. Very nice, but I do not have another to compare it to. This set was rec. to me by David Ross (who I believe is the author of the above description.....at least I am fairly sure) and as I have posted before, I continue to be in his debt for directing me this way. For not much more ($24 from secondary sources at Amazon), I would just grab the whole set. My favorite is the 1st and the Finlandia, which I have no problem publicly saying I love, is top-shelf....even kicks HvK's IMHO:)

Here is the set:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/ ... F8&s=music

Micha

Post by Micha » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:37 pm

moldyoldie wrote:
Bogey wrote:Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki
Please let me/us know what you think of it; I've been considering purchase. Actually, I'm looking for the "perfect" Sibelius 3rd Symphony, which is the pairing on that CD, as well as a "different" 5th from my Panula, Sargent, Salonen (yuck!), Bernstein/Vienna, and Davis/LSO Live. (Really like the Panula and Sargent.) I've read Segerstam's recording described as "lush and expansive".

Currently listening to the interminable, nearly 100-minute Gliere Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murametz" by Farberman/RPO on Unicorn; trying again to decide if I really like it or if it should be sacrificed for shelf space. The first hour makes for good background music, if you like a consistent drone of romantic, near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of strings.

I realize the symphony has a "program", but it might work better as a silent movie soundtrack.
Is that really 100 minutes long? It seems to fit on one CD. I have been wanting to listen to that symphony for a while. I am thinking about buying the Naxos recording.

I am still looking for a "perfect" Sibelius 3 myself, but I am afraid it's not in the Segerstam set. What I have heard from that set so far (3,4,5, Pohjola's Daughter) is generally pretty good, but I was not nearly as impressed by it as some others apparently are. The sound is nice, warm and rich, the orchestra has considerably improved since the days when they recorded the cycle with Berglund, especially the brass, but musically, I don't find these recordings paricularly distinguished. I find them too general, to fuzzy, soupy, too little detail attentive. Segerstam never struck me as a particularly distinguished interpreter. he gives the music his big bear hug, that's about it. Nice, but not really essential.

I think the best Sibelius 3 I have heard so far is probably Maazel/WP. That set also includes an outstanding 5 and the best 4 I know, so it may well be worth checking it for you to check the set out.

I am surprised you like Sargent who I find fairly indistinguished, too. What is it about the Salonen recording of 5 you don't like? I find that recording very interesting, surprisingly (for Salonen) expansive and brooding, very melancholic and expressive, but I am also impressed by the finely chiseled textures in the first movement. The Philharmonia playing is outstanding, too, as it often is. That reminds me, have you checked out Ashkenazy's recording with the same orchestra? That 3rd is very good, too. Actually, for the more...uh..."romantic" and "lush" Sibelius appetite, I would recommend this set far above Segerstam.
Finally, if you want a really interesting different perspective on Sibelius, check out Rozhdestvensky's recordings which can still be ordered from hmv.co.jp. This is a very "rustic", woodcut like, highly expressive and etched out Sibelius quite unlike anything else.

DavidRoss
Posts: 3384
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 7:05 am
Location: Northern California

Post by DavidRoss » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:12 pm

My favorite recording of the third is probably Berglund's with the Bournemouth. Yes, Segerstam is a bit glossy, but the playing is just gorgeous to my ears and the sound quality easily betters my other "lush" Sibelius favorite, Bernstein/NYPO. And his powerful 4th and Tapiola are pretty damned convincing. But the readily available cycle I'd probably be most likely to recommend these days is the reissued Blomstedt/SFSO set.

Micha and I share a high regard for the Maazel/WP set, and for Rozhedestvensky's--though I'd be unlikely to suggest the latter as a "starter set." It's BIG--passionate, committed playing, even ferocious at times. I'm especially fond of the 1st, 3rd, and 5th in this set. It's about as far from Vänskä's lean, stripped-down Sibelius as you can get, but sure makes a strong case for this interpretive approach. However, when it comes to Ashkenazy, I'm afraid we'll just have to agree to disagree. To me he approaches Sibelius as if he were Rachmaninoff--just not my cup of tea.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

Micha

Post by Micha » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:53 pm

DavidRoss wrote:My favorite recording of the third is probably Berglund's with the Bournemouth. Yes, Segerstam is a bit glossy, but the playing is just gorgeous to my ears and the sound quality easily betters my other "lush" Sibelius favorite, Bernstein/NYPO. And his powerful 4th and Tapiola are pretty damned convincing. But the readily available cycle I'd probably be most likely to recommend these days is the reissued Blomstedt/SFSO set.

Micha and I share a high regard for the Maazel/WP set, and for Rozhedestvensky's--though I'd be unlikely to suggest the latter as a "starter set." It's BIG--passionate, committed playing, even ferocious at times. I'm especially fond of the 1st, 3rd, and 5th in this set. It's about as far from Vänskä's lean, stripped-down Sibelius as you can get, but sure makes a strong case for this interpretive approach. However, when it comes to Ashkenazy, I'm afraid we'll just have to agree to disagree. To me he approaches Sibelius as if he were Rachmaninoff--just not my cup of tea.
What does that mean, "as if he were Rachmaninoff?" I am surprised you don't like the Ashkenazy recordings, but you do like Segerstam. They aren't that far apart in their basic approach. Except that Ashkenazy is more detail attentive, better played and recorded. I am not at all that impressed by the recorded sound quality of the Segerstam recordings. Warm, fuzzy, soft focus, yes, I can see how that can be perceived as attractive, but it really washes out too much detail in the music. And I HATE HATE HATE what he did with the bass line in the finale of the 5th. He really destroyed the special sound Sibelius worked out when the main theme first comes in in the basses.

niksati

Post by niksati » Sat Nov 11, 2006 3:19 am

Mostly bitter-sweet sounds like chopin's ballade no.1, and his mazurkas. Now currently madly in love with Hvorostovsky's angelic voice (and with the person as well ), *sigh* :oops:

jserraglio
Posts: 6480
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Sat Nov 11, 2006 10:26 am

Scriabin - Sonatas - Ashkenazy - Decca LP

Bartok - Music for SPC/ Hindemith Mathis - Karajan - Odeon LP

Arnold - Fifth - EMI LP

and . . .
Image
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Nov 12, 2006 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

hautbois
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 6:59 am
Location: East Malaysia

Post by hautbois » Sat Nov 11, 2006 11:10 am

Following the recent Sibelius fuzz over the board...

Sibelius Symphony No. 1

Sir Simon Rattle, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

CharmNewton
Posts: 1974
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:10 pm

Post by CharmNewton » Sat Nov 11, 2006 12:27 pm

niksati wrote:Mostly bitter-sweet sounds like chopin's ballade no.1, and his mazurkas. Now currently madly in love with Hvorostovsky's angelic voice (and with the person as well ), *sigh* :oops:
Then you would probably love the DVD of his singing the Act I Nedda-Silvio duet from I Pagliacci with Anna Netrebko (St. Petersburg Gala on TDK). Then again maybe not... :)

John

moldyoldie
Posts: 588
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:51 pm
Location: Motown, USA

Post by moldyoldie » Sat Nov 11, 2006 2:00 pm

Thanks, Bogey, David and Micha, for the reviews and recommendations. I love Ashkenazy's Sibelius 1st as well as his Finlandia, En Saga, et al. (Played like Rachmaninov, eh?)
Micha wrote:Is [Gliere Sym. No. 3] really 100 minutes long? It seems to fit on one CD. I have been wanting to listen to that symphony for a while. I am thinking about buying the Naxos recording.
The Farberman/RSO recording is about 93 minutes, supposedly conforming to the composer's own time specifications. Still, it's too d--n long and often monotonous! Now, put a movie with it....

Other recorded versions are either edited, or in the case of a few, simply performed more briskly allowing for its entirety on a single CD. I think the latter might work; the piece does have its moments.
Micha wrote:I am surprised you like Sargent who I find fairly indistinguished, too. What is it about the Salonen recording of 5 you don't like? I find that recording very interesting, surprisingly (for Salonen) expansive and brooding, very melancholic and expressive, but I am also impressed by the finely chiseled textures in the first movement.
"Brooding and melancholic" -- that about sums up my feelings on Salonen's Sibelius 5th. As to its "expressive" qualities, it imparted nothing but abject depression. :lol: This was my first exposure to the 5th, or any other Sibelius symphony other than the 2nd. "Gawd," I said. "What a Gloomy Gus!" In any case, Micha, I'm glad you like it. :D

The recording was perhaps too spacious, the most spacious of any Sibelius recording I've yet heard. The listener is in the last row of the balcony.

For what it's worth, I like the coupled Pohjola's Daughter; Salonen's brooding approach seems to work there.

Bernstein/VP on DG takes a similar ultra-expansive approach with the 5th, but at least Lenny knew when to hit the gas and reach for the heights; plus the DG recording was up close and personal, not distant and removed, albeit with a few strident moments during fortissimos. I'm guessing that Segerstam's latest recording alleviates much of this. I have his Ondine recording of The Tempest Suites -- absolutely gorgeous playing and recording!

I picked up the Sargent in a cut-out bin -- what a difference! The tempos were upbeat and invigorating; the winds and horns called forth an awakening instead of a mourning; the playing was taut and lively and the recording intimate with only a hint of unobstrusive late-'50s tape hiss.

Salonen I. 14:00 II. 10:03 III. 9:27
Sargent I. 12:20 II. 8:34 III. 8:27

Perhaps to a non-musician and Sibelius amateur such as myself, these tempos make a world of difference. All I know is that I'd never recommend the Salonen to anyone not already familiar with the 5th. I won't even pretend to argue its "Sibelian merits", if any. But...I'm still glad you like it, Micha. :D


Currently listening to Bach's Brandenburg Concertos (English Concert, Pinnock; and also English Chamber Orchestra, Leppard) I've gotta say, the adagios played with Pinnock's "original instruments" kinda grate on me. :x Nice playing, however.

Micha

Post by Micha » Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:26 pm

moldyoldie wrote:Thanks, Bogey, David and Micha, for the reviews and recommendations. I love Ashkenazy's Sibelius 1st as well as his Finlandia, En Saga, et al. (Played like Rachmaninov, eh?)
Oh yes, the 1st in that set is *particularly* good. One of the best I know. Maybe even the best? No, I can't say that. There are so many good ones. I just got a new one: Jansons with SOBR (on Sony), a very expressive and dramatic live performance. Great playing and very good sound, too. One of my favorite 1st now. Another favorite is Berglund/HPO (EMI) which gets the tone of the piece just right, its lyrical, its melancholic, but also its frantic, at times even crazy drive.

I will just pick up the Naxos recording of Glière's 3rd, I think, its cheap so I can't do much wrong there. Or maybe Botstein/LSO on Telarc? That one is available for next to nothing here, and even though the Bratislava radio orchestra's Eastern European sound might be welcome in this repertoire, I think the LSO will likely be better.

Maybe you will like the Salonen Sibelius 5th, too, one day. I can see how the expansiveness of the reading may have put you off at first ear, but I find especially the finale so nobly and grandly melancholic that it stays firmly among my favorite recordings of this work, although I have so many.

miranda
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2005 5:13 pm

Post by miranda » Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:31 pm

Today I listened to the two discs of the Violin Sonatas, Op. 5, Complete, of Arcangelo Corelli, (1653-1713), exquisitely performed by Andrew Manze (violin), and Richard Egarr (harpsichord), on the harmonia mundi label.

And then today I had the revelatory experience of listening to the always amazing Lorraine Hunt Lieberson (named as just Lorraine Hunt on this album, since it was recorded years before she met her future husband, Peter Lieberson) on the contemporary composer Peter Harbison's album At First Light. Peter Harbison, as some of you will no doubt recall, was the composer for the Met Opera The Great Gatsby. From Wikipedia: "When asked for his "artistic Credo" Harbison (1990) replied: "to make each piece different from the others, to find clear, fresh large designs, to reinvent traditions." He has certainly done that with this magnificent recording, particularly with Lorraine singing excerpts of the surreal and lyrical poems of Eugenio Montale with an unforgettable emotion and intensity. Dawn Upshaw has a fine turn here as well, singing a Martin Luther text set to Harbison's wonderful music. And the instrumental music on this album is quite beautiful as well. If you don't usually fancy contemporary composers, give this album a chance. It is truly stunning, and richly rewarding to multiple listens. It's available through Archiv Music,
here

Image
Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 25 guests