What are you listening to?

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Dalibor
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Post by Dalibor » Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:37 pm

Orlande de Lassus - some compilation starting with "Aurora lucis rutilat - Motet a 10", sung by the choir of New College Oxford. Sounds springty and serene, good stuff for laid-back listening

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:20 am

In the week ending Sat., Nov 11, 2006, I listened to the following:

1 ) 9/10 J.S. Bach: The Works for Organ, Vol 15, mostly aopcrypha, unfinished pieces, etc.--Kevin Bowyer, Marcussen Organ of St Hans Kirche, Odense, Denmark--2 CD Nimbus set

2 ) 9/9 Beethoven: Syms 7, 8--Wyn Morris, cond. LSO--Carlton Classics.

3 ) 9/9 Schumann: Etudes after Paganini, Op. 3; Fantasiestucke, Op. 12; Supplement to Op. 12;Fantaisie, Op. 17--Jorg Demus, piano--Vol 5 of a 13 Vol. Nuovo Era set.

4 ) 9/9 Mahler: Sym 4--Inbal, Frankfurt RSO, Helen Donath, soprano--Brilliant. Recorded at a very low level, needs a lot of gain to sound decent.

5 ) 10/10 Schoenberg: Gurre-Lieder--Robert Craft, cond. Philharmonia Orch., Stephen O'Mara, tenor, Melanie Diener, soprano, Jennifer Lane, mezzo-soprano, David Wilson-Johnson, bass, Martyn Hill, tenor, Ernst Haefliger, speaker--2 CD Naxos set

6 ) 10/10 Shostakovich: Sym 8--Rudolf Barshai, cond., WDR sym Orch--Brilliant
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bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:45 am

Chopin - Etudes Op.10 & Op.25

Andrei Gavrilov - Pianist

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:51 am

Eetu Pellonpää wrote:I'm just starting to listen Henry Purcell's "King Arthur".

EDIT: I'm not very experienced in the classical music field, but this sounds quite much like G.F.Händel's work, like the 3rd act overture. Some very beautiful song sequences here, but as a complete work there are also bit boring parts here?

If anybody could suggest me some shorter vocal works of Purcell I would be very grateful! :D (or some great arias from his operas f.ex.)
hyperion is the label of choice for Purcell. Among other things, I can recommend their 8 CD set of his Complete Odes and Welcome Songs. Although this is a lot of music, listening to them is very rewarding, and none of the individual works is anywhere near as long as "King Arthur."

Oh, and if you like that, I recommend going back a little further in time to some of the music of Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, especially The Rosary Sonatas.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:59 am

moldyoldie wrote:
Bogey wrote:Sibelius Symphony No. 5 Segerstam/Helsinki
Please let me/us know what you think of it; I've been considering purchase. Actually, I'm looking for the "perfect" Sibelius 3rd Symphony, which is the pairing on that CD, as well as a "different" 5th from my Panula, Sargent, Salonen (yuck!), Bernstein/Vienna, and Davis/LSO Live. (Really like the Panula and Sargent.) I've read Segerstam's recording described as "lush and expansive".

Currently listening to the interminable, nearly 100-minute Gliere Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murametz" by Farberman/RPO on Unicorn; trying again to decide if I really like it or if it should be sacrificed for shelf space. The first hour makes for good background music, if you like a consistent drone of romantic, near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of strings.

I realize the symphony has a "program", but it might work better as a silent movie soundtrack.
Moldy, you don't have the right attitude. You don't try to fit your music into your house. If you are a truly dedicated music lover, you will organize your house around your music. :D
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Ricordanza
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Post by Ricordanza » Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:48 am

bOrbOt wrote:Chopin - Etudes Op.10 & Op.25

Andrei Gavrilov - Pianist
I have this CD and, I must confess, after listening a couple of times, decided to seek another, more satisfactory rendition of the Etudes. Gavrilov's technical mastery is certainly admirable, but the point of these these pieces is to solve the technical problems so that the beauty of the music can be fully expressed. In many of the Etudes, this is something that Gavrilov fails to do. The result is ugly display, not Chopin.

I have heard a live performance of the Etudes which was musically as well as technically outstanding--Louis Lortie. Perhaps I will purchase his recording of the set.

johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:21 am

Gliere - Holiday at Ferghana Overture (Chandos)
Barber - Knoxville: Summer of 1915 (Naxos)
Tuur - Violin Concerto (ECM)

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Nov 12, 2006 10:19 am

Image
Irish Night At The Pops - Fiedler - LP RCA LSC 2946
live in Symphony Hall - the ambience of this great hall full of people reproduced handsomely, the music is wonderful, and the orchestra plays like a million bucks.

paulb
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Post by paulb » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:37 pm

J Nguyen wrote:Schnittke- Symphony No.2 "St.Florian"
Segerstam, Royal Stockholm Orchestra, Mikaeli Chamber Choir
Quite an experience. Glad to know someone here has braved this work and loves it.

I realzied today our BIS release does not offer a libretto to this 'scared sym". Its a mass and a sym combined, Schnittke up to his usual genius.

So I just ordered the Chandos release, and an confindent the english translation is there. This order will complete my Schnittke/Chandos collection. I have them all now :D Oh what joy.
Psalm 118:22 The Stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing , it is marvelous in our sight.

J Nguyen
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Post by J Nguyen » Sun Nov 12, 2006 2:07 pm

Quite an experience. Glad to know someone here has braved this work and loves it.
Well, the second Symphony was my first attempt at listening to Schnittke. It was a completely new experience, unlike anything I've every heard. It completely shattered my perceptions of music and opened my ears and mind to new possibilities. So it's fairly obvious that I enjoyed it, but I was at times lost and overwhelmed. The texture is amazing and the effect it had on my emotions was profound. Listening to Schnittke for the first time was an interesting, enjoyable experience.

Now I'm listening to Bristow's Symphony in F-Sharp minor, the Chandos one. Jarvi is the conductor and the performers are the musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. It's a beautiful symphony- too bad it's so neglected.

paulb
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Post by paulb » Sun Nov 12, 2006 2:35 pm

J Nguyen wrote:
Quite an experience. Glad to know someone here has braved this work and loves it.
Well, the second Symphony was my first attempt at listening to Schnittke. It was a completely new experience, unlike anything I've every heard. It completely shattered my perceptions of music and opened my ears and mind to new possibilities. So it's fairly obvious that I enjoyed it, but I was at times lost and overwhelmed. The texture is amazing and the effect it had on my emotions was profound. Listening to Schnittke for the first time was an interesting, enjoyable experience.

.
Everyone on this board neds top read and understand what Nguyen expressed here.

Volumes could be devoted to these words, an exegesis is in order.
But I'm afraid i do not have the time anymore.
Yes believe it, I'll save many here the pains of reading my rants and drivel (Right Misha?)
But i will make a topic today and let others discuss.

Nguyen, PM me at any time.
i have all Schnittke, some will take you even further.
There area few from Schnittke that i find not as great. His violin concertos for instance. But this is the exception in his profound genius..
Paul
Psalm 118:22 The Stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing , it is marvelous in our sight.

Sergeant Rock
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Post by Sergeant Rock » Sun Nov 12, 2006 3:53 pm

RebLem wrote:In the week ending Sat., Nov 11, 2006, I listened to the following:

5 ) 10/10 Schoenberg: Gurre-Lieder--Robert Craft, cond. Philharmonia Orch., Stephen O'Mara, tenor, Melanie Diener, soprano, Jennifer Lane, mezzo-soprano, David Wilson-Johnson, bass, Martyn Hill, tenor, Ernst Haefliger, speaker--2 CD Naxos set
I heard Gurre-Lieder live a couple of weeks ago. Gielen conducted the SWR Baden Baden in Frankfurt's Alte Oper. Melanie Diener was the Tove in this performance too. She impressed! I'm going to have to get this Naxos version.

Sarge
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Sun Nov 12, 2006 3:58 pm

'Have had a PARIS CONSERVATORY ORCH. festival going on in the Walkman these days:

Vivaldi's Gloria (Andre Jouve, w/Ensemble Vocal de Paris......an extremely bright, ebullient--if slightly strident--performance; those French femmes singers, with their nasal enunciations, are really an acquired taste!)
Debussy: the orchestral versions of Children's Corner Suite, Danse, & Soiree dans Grenade (Coppola)
Prokofiev: Lt. Kije (Boult)
Ravel's Intro & Allegro (Cluytens, w/Lili Laskine on harp)
Honegger's Pacific 231 (Ansermet)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Sun Nov 12, 2006 5:24 pm

Brahms - Symphony No.1

Sergiu Celebidache/Orchestra Sinfonia de Milano

Sergeant Rock
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Post by Sergeant Rock » Sun Nov 12, 2006 5:27 pm

After a great steak dinner (rare in Germany!) and a bottle of wine, I'm sitting here in a mild stupor, enjoying a glass (or two) of the Dew (Tullamore Dew) and listening to Sibelius: Luonnotar and The Bard, Gibson conducting the Scottish National.

Sarge
Last edited by Sergeant Rock on Sun Nov 12, 2006 5:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Sun Nov 12, 2006 5:33 pm

Ricordanza wrote:
bOrbOt wrote:Chopin - Etudes Op.10 & Op.25

Andrei Gavrilov - Pianist
I have this CD and, I must confess, after listening a couple of times, decided to seek another, more satisfactory rendition of the Etudes. Gavrilov's technical mastery is certainly admirable, but the point of these these pieces is to solve the technical problems so that the beauty of the music can be fully expressed. In many of the Etudes, this is something that Gavrilov fails to do. The result is ugly display, not Chopin.

I have heard a live performance of the Etudes which was musically as well as technically outstanding--Louis Lortie. Perhaps I will purchase his recording of the set.
I agree with you. Gavrilov does play these etudes with technical mastery. However, At certain times, I feel as if this mastery makes the pieces seem rushed and dry, if you will.

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sun Nov 12, 2006 5:58 pm

RebLem wrote:Moldy, you don't have the right attitude. You don't try to fit your music into your house. If you are a truly dedicated music lover, you will organize your house around your music. :D
If only room would permit. :roll: Thank you, Bob Villa (or is it Martha Stewart?). :D
RebLem wrote:6 ) 10/10 Shostakovich: Sym 8--Rudolf Barshai, cond., WDR sym Orch--Brilliant
As I've posted elsewhere, I'm very partial to the Shostakovich Eighth and would be interested in knowing where the Barshai ranks among those recordings of it you've heard, or does your 10/10 rating say it all?


After watching the epitome of ineptitude known as the Detroit Lions lose again, this time to the who-I-thought-were-even-more-lowly San Francisco 49ers, I'm wallowing in a large Pizza Hut Veggie Lovers Pan Pizza, a $3.90 bottle of French syrah (on sale, half-price, and surprisingly not bad!), and Shostakovich's Cello Concertos -- Natalia Gutman, cello; Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Yuri Temirkanov, cond.
Last edited by moldyoldie on Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Dalibor
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Post by Dalibor » Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:46 pm

J.S. Bach - English suite (from computer midi)

Never heared anything this dull and unoriginal. Why is this held for one of better Bach's works is beyond me at the moment

premont
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Post by premont » Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:54 pm

Dalibor wrote:J.S. Bach - English suite (from computer midi)

Never heared anything this dull and unoriginal. Why is this held for one of better Bach's works is beyond me at the moment
It is not fair to judge music from a midi version. Try a version played on harpsichord (best) or on piano (second-best). Even Glenn Gould is better than midi.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Sun Nov 12, 2006 8:01 pm

Dave Brubeck
Chromatic Fantasy Sonata
Jn Salmon


Image
Karl Henning, PhD
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Micha

Post by Micha » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:14 pm

Sergeant Rock wrote:After a great steak dinner (rare in Germany!) and a bottle of wine, I'm sitting here in a mild stupor, enjoying a glass (or two) of the Dew (Tullamore Dew) and listening to Sibelius: Luonnotar and The Bard, Gibson conducting the Scottish National.

Sarge
What, you don't have a good Argentinian steak house around where you live?

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:58 pm

Beethoven's Pathétique, Moonlight, and Appassionata Sonatas - John O'Conor, piano

bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Mon Nov 13, 2006 12:04 am

Prokofiev - Romeo & Juliet, Op.64

Andre Previn/London Symphony Orchestra

J Nguyen
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Post by J Nguyen » Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:20 am

Barber- Medea Ballet Suite
Alsop/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Naxos

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:22 am

Schnittke:
- Symphony No. 4
- Requiem

Uppsala Academic Chamber Choir, Stockholm Sinfonietta, and soloists on Bis label

(Yes, Paulb, I like Schnittke, also.)

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:59 am

George Szell, The Concertgebouw Recordings. 2 cds(Philips)

J Nguyen
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Post by J Nguyen » Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:33 am

Barber- Prayers of Kierkegaard
Mester, Louisville Orchestra

bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:19 pm

Brahms - Violin Concerto, Op.77

Anne-Sophie Mutter/Herbert von Karajan/Berlin Philharmonic

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:46 pm

Just borrowed from the library a Marco Polo disc full of music by British light composer ERNEST TOMLINSON (Marco Polo 8223413).......when it comes to small gems from the Brits, I'd go with Coates or Ketelbey any old day; Tomlinson's not as attention-grabbing as those guys.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:09 am

Brahms - Violin Sonata No.1

Daniel Barenboim-Pianist/Pinchas Zukerman-Violinist

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Post by moldyoldie » Tue Nov 14, 2006 10:18 am

Entire 6-CD cycle of Beethoven's symphonies and appended overtures by the London Classical Players led by Roger Norrington, again trying to decide if it's a candidate for culling to make room on the shelves. This is my fourth or fifth go-round with these.

Sometimes :D
Other times :x
Once in a while :o
Most times :?

I've gotta admit, I kind of like those funky horns and tympani...as a diversion.

The only other "original instruments" performance of Beethoven I've heard is the Ninth by Roy Goodman and the Hanover Band, of which I'm rather fond. I don't know if it's the spacious, somewhat reverberant acoustic (the typical Nimbus label sound) or the performance itself -- probably a combination. I believe the "space" takes an edge off those strident strings.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:43 am

Image

also, stereo recordings of Beethoven's Fifth and Eighth and an album of Romantic String music with the same performers

Sergeant Rock
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Post by Sergeant Rock » Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:36 pm

Elgar Symphony No.2 and Sospiri, Jeffery Tate, the London Symphony Orchestra. This is an extremely bipolar interpretation of the symphony. The opening of the symphony, for example, thows out any pretense of "nobilmente", opting instead for a hyperactive explosion. This is an incredibly exciting beginning. But he pulls in the reigns so dramatically, with a speed so slow, it really highlights the extreme mood changes of this movement. It's all very disturbing. Love it!

Image


Sarge
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

Sergeant Rock
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Post by Sergeant Rock » Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:39 pm

moldyoldie wrote:Entire 6-CD cycle of Beethoven's symphonies and appended overtures by the London Classical Players led by Roger Norrington, again trying to decide if it's a candidate for culling to make room on the shelves. This is my fourth or fifth go-round with these.
I've gotta admit, I kind of like those funky horns and tympani...as a diversion.
Keep it! Buy another shelf :D There's nothing else like it...no other HIP version even comes close, in my opinion. Those horns and tympani shouldn't be considered a diversion but integral to the true sound of a Beethoven symphony.

Sarge
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:37 pm

Sergeant Rock wrote:Elgar Symphony No.2 and Sospiri, Jeffery Tate, the London Symphony Orchestra . . . .
You know, I picked this up six or nine months ago, but I haven't listened to it just yet. Nice to know that I have something to look forward to, Sarge! :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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bOrbOt
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Post by bOrbOt » Tue Nov 14, 2006 3:22 pm

Beethoven Complete Piano Sonatas

Richard Goode - Pianist

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Post by Wallingford » Tue Nov 14, 2006 3:28 pm

moldyoldie wrote:Entire 6-CD cycle of Beethoven's symphonies and appended overtures by the London Classical Players led by Roger Norrington, again trying to decide if it's a candidate for culling to make room on the shelves. This is my fourth or fifth go-round with these.

Sometimes :D
Other times :x
Once in a while :o
Most times :?

I've gotta admit, I kind of like those funky horns and tympani...as a diversion.

The only other "original instruments" performance of Beethoven I've heard is the Ninth by Roy Goodman and the Hanover Band, of which I'm rather fond. I don't know if it's the spacious, somewhat reverberant acoustic (the typical Nimbus label sound) or the performance itself -- probably a combination. I believe the "space" takes an edge off those strident strings.
Ever checked out the David Zinman/Zurich Tonhalle set? They're a nice alternative.....Zinman made an even greater try at obeying Beethoven's metronome markings; and the results are some truly hair-raising performances.

Myself, I'm trying to get all of Norrington's (I have 2 LPs & 1 cassette). Both sets are good to have around.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Tue Nov 14, 2006 8:21 pm

Wallingford wrote:Ever checked out the David Zinman/Zurich Tonhalle set?
I've sampled Zinman's Ninth. :roll: Sorry, not my cuppa tea. Thanks for the suggestion anyway. :) I just copped Thielemann's Fifth and Seventh on DG for five bones -- the extreme opposite of Zinman.

Currently listening to a beautiful recording of Rachmaninoff's Vespers with the Robert Shaw Festival Singers on Telarc -- sublime!
It's not nearly as dark and foreboding as another recording I have on a Melodiya(?) LP with the U.S.S.R. Russian Chorus, which would probably be deemed idiomatic.

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Post by CharmNewton » Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:00 am

With all thi talk of Beethoven it's coincidental that I spent the weekend with the Rattle/VPO set on EMI. This is the first time I've ever just spent days with a Beethoven cycle, and listened to a few of the symphonies two or three times.

Whether it's the new edition, Rattle's balances or live recording, these are light, fleet readings (except for the Ninth). Winds are very prominent and there is lots of inner string details that emerge, inner tremolos popping out here and there, contributing to this impression of fleetness. This is Beethoven the confident optimist. On the whole the orchestra takes on a bright, colorful sound--perhaps due to the wind balances and some of the unique sounds of the VPO, notably horns and trombones. The strings play with little or no vibrato. This same sunniness is heard in Zinman's recordings which also use the new Barenreiter Edition, although the latter's are better recorded and generally more exciting.

The Ninth gets a broad reading, timing at nearly 70 minutes, but it isn't slow, just weighty. This weightiness makes the Ninth sound very different from the other eight.

This is a set that will wear well for a long time, like Muti's. An interesting aside is that although I ordered it from the BMG club, it came with a Tower Records price sticker on it.

John

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Post by bOrbOt » Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:59 am

Bach, J.S. - Complete Cello Suites

Janos Starker

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Post by karlhenning » Wed Nov 15, 2006 9:40 am

Schumann
Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Opus 97
Zinman / Tonhalle
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

CharmNewton
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Post by CharmNewton » Wed Nov 15, 2006 10:09 am

bOrbOt wrote:Bach, J.S. - Complete Cello Suites

Janos Starker
Can you tell us which of his four complete recordings. The set on Mercury (1964) is probably the most common, but I think that set reflects a mode of thinking which probably sounded avant-garde when they were new. They still sound unique today, although not among my favorites. The recordings for Sefel (c. 1983) have more traditional tempi. I haven't heard the RCA set (c. 1995), but I would expect them to be closer to the Sefel recordings, which are no longer easy to find.

There is also a monaural set he recorded for EMI (c. 1958) which has been re-issued with Johanna Martzy's recordings of the Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin. Her broad approach to these works was quite unusual in the early 1950s when they were made, but they are probing and she makes her approach work. It was also issued in Introuvables de Janos Starker, a nice collection of his EMI recordings.

John

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Post by karlhenning » Wed Nov 15, 2006 5:18 pm

Schumann
Requiem für Mignon, Op. 98b


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http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Sergeant Rock
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Post by Sergeant Rock » Wed Nov 15, 2006 5:44 pm

karlhenning wrote:Schumann
Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Opus 97
Zinman / Tonhalle

Coincidently I listened to the Schumann Third today, too, Karl, as I prepared dinner. Mine was a very different reading though: Barenboim and the Staatskapelle Berlin. Extraordinary. A critic who shall remain nameless called it "a performance for the ages" and after hearing this I can tell you that was not hyperbole.

The critic who will remain nameless also said this, comparing Zinman and Barenboim:

"The wonderful thing about both Barenboim and Zinman is that at this late date, and in these works, we have two such totally different yet equally valid viewpoints, both of which justify yet another look at this oft-recorded repertoire. Excellence at this level serves only to renew our faith both in the vitality of the classics and in the ability of today's interpreters to triumphantly stand toe to toe with the greatest recorded documents of the past."

Sarge
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

Sergeant Rock
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Location: Wine Country, Germany

Post by Sergeant Rock » Wed Nov 15, 2006 6:00 pm

karlhenning wrote:Schumann
Requiem für Mignon, Op. 98b
The Mignon is very beautiful. My copy was a Christmas present from Mrs. Rock.

Sarge
"My unpretending love's the B flat major by the old Budapest done"---John Berryman, Beethoven Triumphant

J Nguyen
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:14 am
Location: Orange County

Post by J Nguyen » Wed Nov 15, 2006 8:15 pm

Bruckner- Symphony No.0 in D Minor
Naxos
Tintner/ National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland

Berg- Violin Concerto
Deutsche Grammophon
Anne-Sophie Mutter, James Levine, Chicago Symphony Orchestra

bOrbOt
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 4:53 am

Post by bOrbOt » Thu Nov 16, 2006 2:30 am

CharmNewton wrote:
bOrbOt wrote:Bach, J.S. - Complete Cello Suites

Janos Starker
Can you tell us which of his four complete recordings. The set on Mercury (1964) is probably the most common, but I think that set reflects a mode of thinking which probably sounded avant-garde when they were new. They still sound unique today, although not among my favorites. The recordings for Sefel (c. 1983) have more traditional tempi. I haven't heard the RCA set (c. 1995), but I would expect them to be closer to the Sefel recordings, which are no longer easy to find.

There is also a monaural set he recorded for EMI (c. 1958) which has been re-issued with Johanna Martzy's recordings of the Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin. Her broad approach to these works was quite unusual in the early 1950s when they were made, but they are probing and she makes her approach work. It was also issued in Introuvables de Janos Starker, a nice collection of his EMI recordings.

John
They are from the Mercury set. :)

Dalibor
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Post by Dalibor » Thu Nov 16, 2006 5:35 am

Paul Hindemith - Mathis Der Maler (symphony)

I listened only the first movement some time ago and now went thourgh the whole thing (on recomendation of some people from this forum). It is a superb work, all three parts are full of atmosphere, have particulary memorable parts and are greatly structured. But it doesn't sound so great on the first listening, definitely - expecialy on computer midi :o:

I would like to hear real recording - can anyone recomend me a good version, containing eventualy some more stuff from Hindemith?

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Nov 16, 2006 8:45 am

Sergeant Rock wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Schumann
Requiem für Mignon, Op. 98b
The Mignon is very beautiful. My copy was a Christmas present from Mrs. Rock.
Splendid, Sarge! That Schumann could write pretty music :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Nov 16, 2006 9:41 am

Stravinsky, Rite, Boulez, CO--now I'm ready to face the workday!
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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