What are you listening to?

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hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Sat Jan 20, 2007 1:53 pm

walboi wrote:Antonio Pasculli. (1842-1924)

Character Pieces and Fantasies.

Yeon-Hee Kwak, oboe.
Chia Chou, piano.
Ursula Eisert, harp.

MDG 603-0942-2.
Recorded 1998-1999.

This disc is showered with prices for performance and recording, and rightly so. Let me tell you what the critics say about it :!:

You absolutely have to hear this soloist. That this extraordinary woman doesn't pass out is truly a miracle. (Classics Today.com)
A Paganini for the Oboe. ( Fermate)


I am truly amazed at so much beauty of tone performance and recording, not to mention this obscure composer that has this to his name.
It is a joy to listen to this music, as I urge you to do also.
Harry[/b]
Anyone who manages them without passing out are truly great exponents of their oboes. Some other oboists who performed these fabulously on cd are Malcolm Messiter and Heinz Holliger. But like how we are overwhelmed by violinists who record the abundance of Paganini works, i prefer to direct my path to beautiful playing which incorporates less virtuosity (or better said 'hidden virtuosity'). If you are into oboe music just like me try out Han de Vries baroque concertos on 2 cds reissued at a bargain price on EMI's 2 cd treasures.

MDG makes fabulously cds of wind music from German performers (many of them being German-Koreans oboists). A disc of Rossini overtures with the Consortium Classicum (a fabulous wind ensemble) will leave you in awe. A disc of similar programme and being equally recommendable would be reissues of the Netherlands Wind Ensemble which i think are hard to find nowadays.

Howard

James

Post by James » Sat Jan 20, 2007 2:36 pm

Dutilleux's Sym. 2 "Le Double" :shock:

Bogey
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Post by Bogey » Sat Jan 20, 2007 3:17 pm

Image

maskedman
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Post by maskedman » Sat Jan 20, 2007 3:48 pm

[quote="walboi"][b]Arp-Schnitger-Orgel Norden.

Works from: Weckmann/Byrd/Buxtehude/Bach/Schlick/Arauxo/Scheidt/Bohm.

Agnes Luchterhandt/Thiemo Janssen, Orgel.

MDG 906 1363-2. 2+2+2 recording 2005[/b]

Absolutely fascinating musical journey, played on a beautiful sounding organ, and played to perfection. The recording is spectacular too with the 2+2+2 mode, but in stereo its also smashing.
Never heard the "Passamezzo Pavana" from Byrd more gorgeous as on this cd, and that goes for all the composers on this cd.
Recommended :!:
Harry :shock:[/quote]

Harry,

You should be merrily along in your MDG quest. Whats your impression so far....ie sound performances....

walboi
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Post by walboi » Sat Jan 20, 2007 5:30 pm

maskedman wrote:
walboi wrote:Arp-Schnitger-Orgel Norden.

Works from: Weckmann/Byrd/Buxtehude/Bach/Schlick/Arauxo/Scheidt/Bohm.

Agnes Luchterhandt/Thiemo Janssen, Orgel.

MDG 906 1363-2. 2+2+2 recording 2005


Absolutely fascinating musical journey, played on a beautiful sounding organ, and played to perfection. The recording is spectacular too with the 2+2+2 mode, but in stereo its also smashing.
Never heard the "Passamezzo Pavana" from Byrd more gorgeous as on this cd, and that goes for all the composers on this cd.
Recommended :!:
Harry :shock:
Harry,

You should be merrily along in your MDG quest. Whats your impression so far....ie sound performances....
I have listened to five out of a pile from 31, and I must say that sound performance is most excelent!
Harry

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:51 am

Image

Had to get this after hearing Muti conduct the VPO in the 4th, "Tragic", Symphony live last year.

Image

The Swingle Singers

Bach and Mozart transcribed for a cappella. They doo, doo, doo the Badinerie and duh-buh, duh-buh the Alla turca. What fun!

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Jan 21, 2007 3:23 am

In the week ending Saturday, 20 JAN 2007, I listened to the following:

1. 10/10 CDs 1-4 of the 8 CD Music & Arts boxed set, The Fine Arts Quartet at WFMT Radio. WFMT is a fine arts and classical music station that has been in business in Chicago since the early 1950's. It the late 1980's, it had an ownership and management change which would up tarnishing its reputation and lots of people were up in arms about it, including one of the mainstays of the station, whose broadcasts and books brought him national and international fame, Studs Terkel. Programming was restricted to Top 100 classical, and they introduced produced commercials. It had always been a commercial, for profit enterprise, but up to the late '80's, commercial announcements had simply been read by the announcer on duty at the appropriate times. They also produced lots of programming of their own, including taping CSO concerts, and recording various musicians and chamber ensembles in their own studios. This 8 CD set is a collection of a number of such live broadcasts and WFMT studio recordings by the Fine Arts Quartet in the 1960's and 1970's. State of the art sound for ther period.
CD1--Beethoven: String Quartets, Op. 59, #1 (40:37) & #2 (31:33)
CD2--Beethoven: String Quartet in C Major, Op 59 #3 (28:02) |String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 132 (38:52)
CD3--Haydn: String Quartet in E Flat, Op. 1 #0 (16:03) |Quartet in D, Op 2 #5 (13:05) |Quartet in B Flat, Op. 2 #6 (17:37) |Quartet in F Minor, Op. 20 #5 (18:59)
CD4--Haydn: Quartet in E Flat, Op. 64 #6 (16:33) |Quartet in B Flat, Op. 76 #4 (20:06) |Quartet in E Flat, Op. 76 #6 (21:19)

2. 10/10 CDs 3, 4, & 5 of the 9 CD Annie Fischer Supraphon box of the Beethoven Piano Sonatas.. Sonatas 7, 9, 10, 14 "Moonlight," 18, 20, 27, 28, 29 "Hammerklavier," 32. All are superbly performed and recorded in state of the art sound for the period in 1977 & 1978.

3. 10/10 CDs 1-4 of 10 CD DG Kubelik, Bavarian RSO cycle of the Mahler Symphonies. CD1--#1 "Titan" (50:00) |CD2--#2 "Resurrection," Edith Mathis, soprano, Norma Procter, contralto (76:24) |CD3 & 4--Sym 3 (93.44), Marjorie Thomas, contralto | CD 4--Sym 10: Adagio (23:56). These are superb performances. Kubelik's Resurrection has moved into second place on my list of great 2nds.; Segerstam, which I heard for the first time just a few weeks ago, is still #1.

4. 10/10 Prokoviev: 7 Symphonies |Lt Kije Suite--Seiji Ozawa, cond. Berlin Phil Orch, Andreas Schmidt, baritone (in Kije)--I have the Martinon and the Jarvi sets, and will start on the Gergiev next week. So far, this is my favorite, overall. These are fine performances, recorded 1989-92. In several cases, there is another performance or two I prefer, but this is, so far, the best set. A couple disappointments--Ozawa does only the revised version of #4, and there is no Sinfonietta in A, which Jarvi did record.

5. 10/10 Siegmeister (1909-91): Solo Piano Music, Vol. 2--Sunday in Brooklyn (1946) (17:22) |Piano Sonata 2 (1964) (11:26) |Theme & Variations 1 (1932) (10:07) |Piano Sonata 3 (1979) (16:58 ) |From These Shores (1985) (15:37)--Kenneth Boulton, piano--NAXOS. I always thought of Siegmeister as a guy from the 30's whom time had passed by. When I was growing up in the 1950's, I took out a few library books consisting of anthologies of popular writing on classical music from the previous 2 decades, ane Elie Siegmeister seemed to be a mainstay of popular journalism about art music in those decades. In the last few years, I have begun to see recordings of his works come out, but with absolutely no publicity that I encountered. Its a shame. These are pleasant, though not great, works. His work is filled with jazz idioms. He is to the great American composers what Glazunov was to Prokofiev, or what Franz Schmidt is to Bruckner and Mahler--pleasant, tuneful, artfully constructed, well worth listening to, but not what you would call great music.

6. 10/10 Liebermann, Rolf (1910-99): Furioso for Orchestra (8:34) |Geigy Festival Concert (12:10) |Medea-Monolog (Cantata) (23:41) |Les Echangers (Symphonic) (3:19) |Concerto for Jazz Band and Symphony Orchestra (16:48 )--Gunter Neuhold, cond., Bremen Phil Orch with various soloists and choirs. Liebermann was a Swiss composer strongly influenced by Hermann Scherchen and Frank Martin.The last piece, Concerto for Jazz Band, might better be called "Riffs on 'New York, New York.'" Interesting work, but sometimes seems filled with faux anger and angst.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Jan 21, 2007 9:30 am

Image
Fascinating live perf which set the critics howling. Heard about it but had never heard it till now.

johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Sun Jan 21, 2007 9:58 am

Rameau - Overture to "Indes galantes" (Rousset/L'oiseau lre)
Bach - English Suite #6 (Piricone/Scandanavian Classics)
Graun - Sonata a tre (Coin/Astree)
Corelli - Concerto Grosso in F, Op. 6 #6 (Rolla/Humgaroton)

Hondo
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Post by Hondo » Sun Jan 21, 2007 3:23 pm

<Fascinating live perf which set the critics howling. Heard about it but had never heard it till now.>

In the introduction to this recording of the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1, Bernstein complains about Gould's slow interpretation of the music, and distances himself from the performance. The irony is that in a later recording Bernstain made with Kristian Zimerman of the same piece, the perfromance was even slower! Sounds like Bernstein finally concluded that Gould's interpretation wasn't so bad after all!

Hondo
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Post by Hondo » Sun Jan 21, 2007 3:43 pm

<Bartok
Concerto for Orchestra
Viola Concerto
Ancerl>

I imagine the Ancerl recordings of these two Bartok works are very good, considering his Bartok performances I'm familiar with. My personal favorites of the Concerto for Orchestra are by Dorati and Reiner, and the Viola Concerto by the person the piece was dedicated to - William Primrose, with Tibor Serly conducting.

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Mon Jan 22, 2007 11:42 am

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The first time i received this cd as a gift from a mentor of mine, i was not enthralled, the moment the tsar bride overture reached 15 seconds, i was destined to repeat this cd throughout for over 3 times that same hearing. It became almost a daily obsession because of the beautiful programme. This local orchestra which i hear almost every week despite it's inconsistency live, usually not so when it was under Kees Bakels (of course there were quite a number of great concerts every year directed by numerous guest conductos like a memorable Bruckner 5th with Claus Peter Flor last year.), has a sparkle in the recording which is unbelievable, and the hall has beautiful accoustics which i have personal experience, being a regular concertgoer and member in the resident youth orchestra.
This is one of those "voice crying in the wilderness" reviews, because I know perfectly well that no one takes Rimsky-Korsakov very seriously these days, and no matter how beautifully the orchestra plays, how excitingly Bakels conducts, and how magnificently they are recorded, few will credit a performance of Russian music coming from Malaysia, particularly at full price. But the fact remains: this has been a sensational series, and this latest release offers sonically splendorous readings of gloriously colorful, attractive music. It deserves your attention and will handsomely repay the investment, because, while it may not be the deepest musical experience, it's hugely enjoyable and, most importantly, eminently repeatable. You'll play this disc often, I promise.

Rimsky-Korsakov's opera suites hardly ever appear on concert programs anymore, and what a pity! Christmas Eve is a magical score, even if the opening goes on a bit too long. It contains one of Rimsky's most ebullient polonaises, and the orchestration truly sparkles. The same is true of The Snow Maiden--and my goodness how this crew attacks the popular concluding Dance of the Tumblers! The Overture on Russian Themes features two well-known tunes, one used in the Coronation Scene in Boris Godunov (as also in Beethoven's Rasumovsky Quartets), the other in Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture. Look folks, if you really care about music and sound, all I can say is grab this disc and give it a listen. It is wholly delightful, and there are no finer performances of this music available. [5/24/2006]

--David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

Don Satz
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Post by Don Satz » Mon Jan 22, 2007 11:50 am

RebLem wrote:In the week ending Saturday, 20 JAN 2007, I listened to the following:


4. 10/10 Prokoviev: 7 Symphonies |Lt Kije Suite--Seiji Ozawa, cond. Berlin Phil Orch, Andreas Schmidt, baritone (in Kije)--I have the Martinon and the Jarvi sets, and will start on the Gergiev next week. So far, this is my favorite, overall. These are fine performances, recorded 1989-92. In several cases, there is another performance or two I prefer, but this is, so far, the best set. A couple disappointments--Ozawa does only the revised version of #4, and there is no Sinfonietta in A, which Jarvi did record.
What qualties of the sound do you consider superb? Frankly, I find the sound on this set rather coarse.
Don Satz

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:07 pm

RebLem wrote:4. 10/10 Prokoviev: 7 Symphonies |Lt Kije Suite--Seiji Ozawa, cond. Berlin Phil Orch, Andreas Schmidt, baritone (in Kije)--I have the Martinon and the Jarvi sets, and will start on the Gergiev next week. So far, this is my favorite, overall. These are fine performances, recorded 1989-92. In several cases, there is another performance or two I prefer, but this is, so far, the best set. A couple disappointments--Ozawa does only the revised version of #4, and there is no Sinfonietta in A, which Jarvi did record.
And that Sinfonietta is an underperformed, underrecorded, undersung gem!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

maskedman
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Post by maskedman » Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:11 pm

ERNST TOCH

STRING QUARTETS 6 & 12

VERDI QUARTET

one of my favorite discs of his quartets.....

maskedman
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Post by maskedman » Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:21 pm

[quote="Hondo"]<Bartok
Concerto for Orchestra
Viola Concerto
Ancerl>

I imagine the Ancerl recordings of these two Bartok works are very good, considering his Bartok performances I'm familiar with. My personal favorites of the Concerto for Orchestra are by Dorati and Reiner, and the Viola Concerto by the person the piece was dedicated to - William Primrose, with Tibor Serly conducting.[/quote]

I love both Ancerl Bartok discs....I like the Reiner equally as well as Ancerl, Bernstein, Boulez and Stokowski...I have that Violin Concerto with Primrose and Serly. I agree this is the best version.

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:30 pm

I just received this today from an eBay seller; available only as an import.

Image
Bruckner: Symphony No. 3 (Oeser Edition); Symphony No. 8 (Haas Edition)
Vienna Philharmonic
Bernard Haitink, cond.
Philips

The Third is quite expansive, especially in the Finale. I'm listening to the Eighth right now and so far really like what I hear. Timings are similar to Karajan/VPO except in the III: Adagio where Haitink is two minutes slower. I'm wondering how the harp will sound. The recording is vivid and lifelike with no overt spotlighting. Horns blaze forth, but the tympani seem understated. Ahh, there's the harp...beautiful! Gotta go.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:34 pm

Haitink and the VPO gave a wonderful live performance of the Bruckner eighth in NYC five or six years ago.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

piston
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Post by piston » Mon Jan 22, 2007 6:41 pm

To the "godfather" of minimalism and his little 1:54:00 piece for the Kronos quartet: Terry Riley, 'Salomé' - Dances for peace. Elektra/Nonesuch, 1988.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon Jan 22, 2007 8:37 pm

Mozart's Flute Concerto #1 (Rampal/Goldschmidt)
Roussel's Third (Wolff.....hope to put on the Boulez as well one of these evenings)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:12 am

On a virgin voyage with...

Image Disc #1 & 2 of 4
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 "Classical"; Symphony No. 4 (revised 1947 version); Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, cond.
Philips

Other than the popular First and Fifth, I'm totally unfamiliar with the symphonies of Prokofiev. This won a 2006 Record of the Year award from a prominent critical mag. (Britain's Gramophone magazine?)

walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 7:21 am

moldyoldie wrote:On a virgin voyage with...

Image Disc #1 & 2 of 4
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 "Classical"; Symphony No. 4 (revised 1947 version); Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, cond.
Philips

Other than the popular First and Fifth, I'm totally unfamiliar with the symphonies of Prokofiev. This won a 2006 Record of the Year award from a prominent critical mag. (Britain's Gramophone magazine?)
Yes, it was the Gramophone!
And it is good, apart from a few quibbles. The breathing from Gergiev, very audible, the recording venue, not the best, and the sluggish performance of the first Symphony, the first two movements. Apart from that, GREAT set!
Harry

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Jan 23, 2007 7:21 am

Image

Ive never heard this Bernstein/BSO perf before. It's a good one.

Coupled with Symphony of Psalms. The bklet has full Latin text with trans by e e cummings but no notes on the music.

walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 7:25 am

jserraglio wrote:Image

Ive never heard this Bernstein/BSO perf before. It's a good one.

Coupled with Symphony of Psalms. The bklet has full Latin text with trans by e e cummings but no notes on the music.
Another mystery for me, the almost obsessive veneration of Bernstein. Most of his recordings are what I think typical Americana, and are abbrasive, and many times offensive against the composers wishes.
Suffice to say that in my collection there is NO Bernstein.
Harry

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:08 am

I do not yet know the Gergiev account of these . . .
moldyoldie wrote:Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 "Classical"; Symphony No. 4 (revised 1947 version); Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, cond.
Philips
Of these four works, my own clear favorite is the Second, which has suffered from long decades of bad press, but which I find vital, strikingly original, and very well shaped.

I hope Gergiev does it justice!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:25 am

Grieg.
Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 & 2

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Mark Ermler.

Beautiful strings, and tempi well chosen.

Collins Classics.

Pianoconcerto.

Seta Tanyel, piano.
London SO/Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos.

Collins Classics.

Tanyel is a very good musician, and de Burgos gives it the appropriate lift.
Harry

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:36 am

walboi wrote:Another mystery for me, the almost obsessive veneration of Bernstein.
Very interesting, Harry! My caution viz. Bernstein is roughly on the same order as my caution viz. Hvk (I don't particularly care, for instance, for how either conductor treats Mozart). But there are a couple of recordings by either conductor which I do enjoy, though not entirely clear of caveats.

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:43 am

karlhenning wrote:
walboi wrote:Another mystery for me, the almost obsessive veneration of Bernstein.
Very interesting, Harry! My caution viz. Bernstein is roughly on the same order as my caution viz. Hvk (I don't particularly care, for instance, for how either conductor treats Mozart). But there are a couple of recordings by either conductor which I do enjoy, though not entirely clear of caveats.

Cheers,
~Karl
That my dear Karl that makes the mystery even deeper! I would not buy Mozart or Haydn for instance from Karajan for I know full well, that those composers are not treated well by him.
Maybe we should make a Thread about it?
Or maybe not doing that, for it will cause fire and emotional rupture amongst certain posters.
O, dear.
Harry
Last edited by walboi on Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:48 am

Solveig's Song done under 5 minutes, well that must be a record, no?
But it makes it lighter, less dramatic, and the strings at 4:00 till the end, makes for a devastating exclamation, wonderful!
Harry

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:56 am

walboi wrote:Solveig's Song done under 5 minutes, well that must be a record, no?
Perhaps Solveig's "business is being happy," Harry? :-)
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:00 am

karlhenning wrote:
walboi wrote:Solveig's Song done under 5 minutes, well that must be a record, no?
Perhaps Solveig's "business is being happy," Harry? :-)
Yes Karl, that would explain everything.
Sometimes the answers are in front of your nose, my nose it is! :lol:
At this speed it feels better I think, and more articulate also!
Harry

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:01 am

Respighi! Trittico botticelliano, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. First hearing of this recording. As expected, beautifully played and very colorful, with enough rhythmic drive to keep it interesting.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:03 am

Orpheus must give the Trittico a good account, Dave! And, good morning!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:13 am

Monteverdi
Sonata sopra "Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis"

from Vespro della Beata Vergine
Boston Baroque / Martin Pearlman


Ah, what exquisite music for morning in chilly Boston!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:21 am

Good morning, Karl--yes, they do. Now i'm trying the third suite from Antiche danze ed arie--it seems more graceful and lilting than the Dorati recording I'm familiar with. Very pleasant, indeed--lovely background music.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:32 am

Grieg, "Symphonic Dances opus 64.

Royal PO/Yondani Butt

ASV records.

The basses in the first movement "Allegro moderato e marcato" I feel in my stomach, "Very Nice" :!:

Truly a E marcato and Moderato, it carries a lot of drama in its bagage!
O, those flutes around 4:24, what joy then! And throughout those basses are in full force, ever so nicely it remembers me of my inner workings.
Harry

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:56 am

Oh, and the Deposuit potentes de sede which is the most expansive number (barring the Doxology) of the Magnificat in the Monteverdi Vespro della Beata Vergine . . . I do love it so!
Karl Henning, PhD
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walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:11 am

Sigurd is not much good in the hands of Butt, the old man is slowing things down to a standstill, well almost, to much pomp, and little detail.
Of course the Crescendi are smashing?, no forget that, it is merely LOUD.
The Prelude in the King's Hall, what a infernal echo there must have been, is just a run through. Pity though, the sound is good!
Harry

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Post by maskedman » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:26 am

[quote="walboi"][quote="moldyoldie"]On a virgin voyage with...

[img]http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/B ... 52696_.jpg[/img] Disc #1 & 2 of 4
[b]Prokofiev: [i]Symphony No. 1 "Classical"; Symphony No. 4[/i] (revised 1947 version); [i]Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3[/i][/b]
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, cond.
Philips

Other than the popular [i]First[/i] and [i]Fifth[/i], I'm totally unfamiliar with the symphonies of Prokofiev. This won a 2006 Record of the Year award from a prominent critical mag. (Britain's [i]Gramophone[/i] magazine?)[/quote]

Yes, it was the Gramophone!
And it is good, apart from a few quibbles. The breathing from Gergiev, very audible, the recording venue, not the best, and the sluggish performance of the first Symphony, the first two movements. Apart from that, GREAT set!
Harry[/quote]

Good morning Harry,

These discs have been in my cart at BMG for sometime. I understand the breathing is a big distraction....enough to put me off...

Robert

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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:28 am

maskedman wrote:
walboi wrote:
moldyoldie wrote:On a virgin voyage with...

Image Disc #1 & 2 of 4
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 "Classical"; Symphony No. 4 (revised 1947 version); Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, cond.
Philips

Other than the popular First and Fifth, I'm totally unfamiliar with the symphonies of Prokofiev. This won a 2006 Record of the Year award from a prominent critical mag. (Britain's Gramophone magazine?)
Yes, it was the Gramophone!
And it is good, apart from a few quibbles. The breathing from Gergiev, very audible, the recording venue, not the best, and the sluggish performance of the first Symphony, the first two movements. Apart from that, GREAT set!
Harry
Good morning Harry,

These discs have been in my cart at BMG for sometime. I understand the breathing is a big distraction....enough to put me off...

Robert
Well its a bit of a nuisance :!:
Harry

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Post by maskedman » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:30 am

[quote="karlhenning"][quote="walboi"]Another mystery for me, the almost obsessive veneration of Bernstein.[/quote]
Very interesting, [b]Harry[/b]! My caution viz. Bernstein is roughly on the same order as my caution viz. Hvk (I don't particularly care, for instance, for how either conductor treats [b]Mozart[/b]). But there are a couple of recordings by either conductor which I do enjoy, though not entirely clear of caveats.

Cheers,
~Karl[/quote]

Good Morning Karl

MAHLER?????????

walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:34 am

Grieg, Lyric Suite starts well with a delightful allegretto, and has enough interesting turns and twists to give some pleasure...., but the Norwegian Rustic Dance, is a let down, and I take my leave from the dancing floor, too much run of the mill, to attract attention. The Nocturne is nice enough, but then it is not hard to bring that of right?
March of the Dwarfs is doing nicely, the most succesful movement so far, and after that there is nothing, Grieg composed nothing more, in the context of this Suite. Butt, does not feel at home in this music, and the Orchestra, a fine one, is following suit.
Harry
Last edited by walboi on Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by maskedman » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:36 am

BARTOK

THE MIRCULOUS MANDARIN

MUSIC FOR STRINGS PERCUSSION AND CELESTA

DORATI
DSO

NICE WAKE-UP

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Post by Don Satz » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:37 am

walboi wrote:
jserraglio wrote:Image

Ive never heard this Bernstein/BSO perf before. It's a good one.

Coupled with Symphony of Psalms. The bklet has full Latin text with trans by e e cummings but no notes on the music.
Another mystery for me, the almost obsessive veneration of Bernstein. Most of his recordings are what I think typical Americana, and are abbrasive, and many times offensive against the composers wishes.
Suffice to say that in my collection there is NO Bernstein.
Harry
It's not a mystery if you factor in "charisma" and superior marketing.
Don Satz

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:40 am

Sibelius
Öinen ratsastus & auringon nousu (Nightride & Sunrise), Opus 55
Helsinki Phil / Segerstam
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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walboi
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Post by walboi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:56 am

karlhenning wrote:Sibelius
Öinen ratsastus & auringon nousu (Nightride & Sunrise), Opus 55
Helsinki Phil / Segerstam
I am sorry Karl, but when we are at it, this Segerstam chap, a bit like Thieleman he is, perplex me concerning the tempi they frequently take, predominantly SLOW.
I think if I would compile a list of no go conductors for me, it would be like this:
Bernstein
Segerstam
Masur
Thielemann
Haitink, with a few exeptions. Shostakovitch for one.
Harnoncourt
Celi
Well that's enough for now I guess.
Harry

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:00 am

walboi wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Sibelius
Öinen ratsastus & auringon nousu (Nightride & Sunrise), Opus 55
Helsinki Phil / Segerstam
I am sorry Karl, but when we are at it, this Segerstam chap, a bit like Thieleman he is, perplex me concerning the tempi they frequently take, predominantly SLOW.
Well, we have another disc (with the Danish Radio Symphony, I think) where the Valse triste is really, really, really too slow.

But I like all the tempi on this disc, at any rate, Harry!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:00 am

Sibelius
Aallottaret (The Oceanides), Opus 73
Helsinki Phil / Segerstam
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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Post by Hondo » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:56 am

Maskedman wrote:

"BARTOK

THE MIRCULOUS MANDARIN

MUSIC FOR STRINGS PERCUSSION AND CELESTA

DORATI
DSO

NICE WAKE-UP"

I think one must be a bit of a masochist to want to wake-up to "The Miraculous Mandarin"! Wonderful music, but probably for a later in the day listen. I agree that Dorati has always been the best interpreter of this piece, although I prefer his BBC recording.

Gabe

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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:01 pm

That Dorati Bartók box is very nice, Gabe!
Karl Henning, PhD
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