Yankee or Dixie Quiz

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BWV 1080
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Yankee or Dixie Quiz

Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 12:15 pm

http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligen ... _quiz.html

56% (Dixie). Barely into the Dixie category.

Not quite sure how the aussies will make out
Last edited by BWV 1080 on Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Ralph » Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:03 pm

68% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Don't make no sense!
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Post by Barry » Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:15 pm

I'm 48% Yankee; just barely made it apparently. Although there were two or three questions where I didn't have an answer, so I just picked one.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

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Post by jbuck919 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:20 pm

Ralph wrote:68% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Don't make no sense!
You been spending a lot of time south of 110th Street.

BTW, Steve, "Dizie" is an interesting Freudian typo. :)

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Post by Teresa B » Wed Jun 06, 2007 4:56 pm

70% Dixie! (Ralph, Ah knew there's sumthin' Ah lahk about yew. 8) )

Teresa
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Post by RebLem » Wed Jun 06, 2007 4:57 pm

47% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.

I had some trouble coming up with answers to some of these, but first, the unambiguous ones.

1. Aunt--ant. The nuns always told us the correct pronunciation was as in want, but they didn't press it.

2. Its car-a-mel, 3 syllables.

3. Creek as in meek.

4. Pajamas as in jam.

6. Of course, cot and caught are pronounced differently, whassamattawhitcha?

10 Crawfish.

12. Frosting.

13. Frontage road.

14. Groceries go in a bag. Sack is what you do when you fire someone from his job. Never even heard of poke. Sounds at least a little dirty to me.

15. Water fountain.

16. Pop. Sometimes Soda Pop.

17. TP'ing.

Now for questions I had a little problem with:

5. Route--clout or toot?
When I speak of a road, like Route 66, I use the "toot" pronunciation. However, when I say "What route did it take?" in reference to a package from UPS, say, I use the "clout" pronunciation.

7. How do you address a group of people? You all, Youse, You'uns, yins, or Y'all?
I don't use any of them. I just say "you," or, more commonly, avoid all of these constructions by referring to the formal name of the group, or saying, "You folks."

8. What kind of sale is it on the front lawn? A garage sale is one in a garage. A yard sale is one in a yard. What could be simpler? I have heard the term "tag sale," but don't use it. To me, a "rummage sale" is a sale conducted for the benefit of a group--a church or a charity to which members of the public contribute used goods for free which are then sold.

9. The long sandwich is a" sub" to me. I do recall, though, that when I was in college in NW Missouri, the locals called them "grinders." I associate "hero" with NY, and "hoagie" with Philadelphia, strictly local terms, it seems to me.

10. Sneakers, tennis shoes, gym shoes, running shoes? At various times, I use all these terms more or less interchangably.

18. I know that the night before Haloween is called "Devils Night" only because I have read about this happening in the Detroit area. It is a phenomenon which is unfamiliar to me in my personal life altogether in any construction.

Another question that ought to have been asked is, "What do you call a major, limited access roadway through an urban area, without traffic lights, and with ramps to take you off it or from one such roadway to another?" 1) Expressway, 2) Freeway, 3) Interstate, 4) Other, or more than 1. (I have used expressway, but here in the southwest, pressures may change my practice on this).

Yet another should be "What do you call the covering of a house or building?"
1. Roof as in wolf? (That's my pronunciation).
2. Roof as in aloof? (Fancy pants types).
Last edited by RebLem on Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:27 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:09 pm

60% Dixie. But this Aussie lived in Texas and Alabama (but has many friends living in Northern States and California these days) as a kid. Trying to remember my Taxen accent (where the all-Barons spake th' Kang's Anglish so fine) is the problem.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:23 pm

100% Dixie, although several answers were tagged Northeast or Great Lakes. I don't get it.

The one they left out that is popular in the south is 'wash.' Sotherners pronounce it "warsh." I had to break myself of the habit of saying "Warshington." Another is 'oil.' My relatives from Texas call it 'erl.'
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:41 pm

According to my Texas pronunciation guide (vintage 1971), "oil" is pronounced "all" - hence my use of the term all-Barons. To pronounce the word "oil" use "earl". Just like the song - Dook of Oil.

Actually, that last bit isn't Texan at all, just a memory from a Steve Martin movie
Last edited by Brendan on Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by RebLem » Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:42 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:100% Dixie, although several answers were tagged Northeast or Great Lakes. I don't get it.

The one they left out that is popular in the south is 'wash.' Sotherners pronounce it "warsh." I had to break myself of the habit of saying "Warshington." Another is 'oil.' My relatives from Texas call it 'erl.'
I have to tell you, lots of Illinoisans, esp NE Illinoisans, pronounce Washington "Worshington." Oil is pronounced OYil.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Post by Teresa B » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:01 pm

Hi Y'all,

Accents and figures of speech may vary a bit more than the quiz indicates. My husband, who grew up in Missouri, says "worsh" and I always said "wash" although I am a native Floridian.

The predominant accent here in central Florida is tinged with southern, but not strongly. We can't seem to resist using "y'all" and draggin' out our vaa-wels a little, but we use hard R's (much less genteel than the lovely Virginia softened ones). And you haven't lived 'til you've heard a Cuban-southern accent. 8)

Teresa
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Author of the novel "Creating Will"

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Post by jbuck919 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:40 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:100% Dixie, although several answers were tagged Northeast or Great Lakes. I don't get it.

The one they left out that is popular in the south is 'wash.' Sotherners pronounce it "warsh." I had to break myself of the habit of saying "Warshington." Another is 'oil.' My relatives from Texas call it 'erl.'
That's Brooklyn, Texas I assume.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by keaggy220 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 9:05 pm

71% dixie

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Post by Haydnseek » Wed Jun 06, 2007 9:39 pm

46% Yankee. I'm originally from Michigan and my parents came from Ohio. I still call it a "Drinking Fountain."
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Post by RebLem » Wed Jun 06, 2007 9:42 pm

Teresa B wrote:Hi Y'all,
Accents and figures of speech may vary a bit more than the quiz indicates. My husband, who grew up in Missouri, says "worsh" and I always said "wash" although I am a native Floridian.

The predominant accent here in central Florida is tinged with southern, but not strongly. We can't seem to resist using "y'all" and draggin' out our vaa-wels a little, but we use hard R's (much less genteel than the lovely Virginia softened ones). And you haven't lived 'til you've heard a Cuban-southern accent. 8)
Teresa
Another thing I've noticed over the years is that lots of Southerners, especially, it seems to me, Georgians, pronounce "important" as if it were spelled "impordant."
Last edited by RebLem on Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 10:20 pm

Supposedly you pick up most of these language habits from your mother. Mine was from the Midwest and despite living in Texas for over 20 years, I score Midwest on a good portion of the questions.

I did notice the Feeder road being a unique Houston term when I moved here 10 years ago. In Dallas they are Access roads. Never have heard a drive through liquor store called a party barn though.

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Dixie Quiz

Post by Agnes Selby » Wed Jun 06, 2007 11:06 pm

I made it! I scored 48%. Now, how would the poor old quiz determine an
Australian/Czech/Hungarian/Philadelphia/British accent? Poor quiz, I had him fooled. :lol: But it was fun.

------------------------

Brendan

Re: Dixie Quiz

Post by Brendan » Wed Jun 06, 2007 11:16 pm

Agnes Selby wrote:I made it! I scored 48%. Now, how would the poor old quiz determine an
Australian/Czech/Hungarian/Philadelphia/British accent? Poor quiz, I had him fooled. :lol: But it was fun.

------------------------
48% Dixie or Yankee?

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:45 am

RebLem wrote: Oil is pronounced OYil.
Must be from the Yiddish. :lol:
16. Pop. Sometimes Soda Pop.
I'm told by a Clevelander that 'pop' is distinctly midwestern, which is Illinois Ohio Iowa [Edited to add Indiana] Michigan Minnesota and not Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota. 'Pop' to me was my dad.
Last edited by Corlyss_D on Thu Jun 07, 2007 2:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by anasazi » Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:40 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
RebLem wrote: Oil is pronounced OYil.
Must be from the Yiddish. :lol:
16. Pop. Sometimes Soda Pop.
I'm told by a Clevelander that 'pop' is distinctly midwestern, which is Illinois Ohio Iowa Michigan Minnesota and not Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota. 'Pop' to me was my dad.
Oh come on, quit forgetting Indiana will 'ya. :) Well, that's what happens when you talk to someone from Cleveland I guess.

Actually, the correct pronunciation is 'sody pop'. Don't forget that Coky Coly (formorly Coca Cola) is a product of Atlanta, GA.

And Oyil? What's that? I always thought it was AWL?
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Re: Dixie Quiz

Post by Agnes Selby » Thu Jun 07, 2007 2:04 am

Brendan wrote:
Agnes Selby wrote:I made it! I scored 48%. Now, how would the poor old quiz determine an
Australian/Czech/Hungarian/Philadelphia/British accent? Poor quiz, I had him fooled. :lol: But it was fun.

------------------------
48% Dixie or Yankee?
----------------

48% Yankee! Did not detect my North Shore Sydney accent at all. :wink:

-----------------------

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Jun 07, 2007 2:33 am

anasazi wrote: Oh come on, quit forgetting Indiana will 'ya. :) Well, that's what happens when you talk to someone from Cleveland I guess.
Thank you, Bill. I've added Indiana :D
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Post by RebLem » Thu Jun 07, 2007 4:05 am

Oh, another one.

What do you call the little slip of paper a waitperson gives you listing the charges you must pay before leaving the restaurant?
1. Bill 2 Check 3 Ticket. 4. Other.

I am used to check. I don't see any logic to this when I stop to think about it; it ought to be bill. A check is something you might pay a bill with, not a bill itself. But it was called a check where I grew up in NE Illinois, and that's all there is to it.

However, I can tell you that in Oklahoma, and most of Texas, and parts of New Mexico and Kansas, they call it a ticket.

Does anybody call it a bill?
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Post by keaggy220 » Thu Jun 07, 2007 4:46 am

RebLem wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:100% Dixie, although several answers were tagged Northeast or Great Lakes. I don't get it.

The one they left out that is popular in the south is 'wash.' Sotherners pronounce it "warsh." I had to break myself of the habit of saying "Warshington." Another is 'oil.' My relatives from Texas call it 'erl.'
I have to tell you, lots of Illinoisans, esp NE Illinoisans, pronounce Washington "Worshington." Oil is pronounced OYil.
I used to say "worsh" until about 10 years ago and I was driving myself crazy!! I made a huge effort and I finally changed the habit and now I say "wash" everytime.

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Post by Donald Isler » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:55 am

Not a very reliable test! I got 53% Dixie, even though all my life I've been a resident of three counties in New York State (New York-Manhattan, Bronx, and Westchester)!
Donald Isler

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accents

Post by Agnes Selby » Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:55 pm

Dear Donald,

At least it identified you as an American. The quiz failed me but it was fun.

Perhaps the only reliable way to distinguish between accents in language is the EAR. It is possible that computers can do a credible job.

I have been "talking" to an internet friend recently about an
old Linquistics Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, now deceased,
who spent his war years in England, identifying German spies who infiltrated Britain. These linguists listened to different inflections in voice and syllable which revealed an English parent or English education.
It was a highly specialised task force.

Does anyone know if there has been a book written about this particular military spying division?

Regards,
Agnes.
---------------

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Post by Donald Isler » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:14 pm

Dear Agnes,

Even these experts get it wrong sometime. I remember one linguistics expert told my mother that she must be from northern Germany, whereas she comes from the southern part where the dialect is quite different.

Yet another expert we know, this one in political science specializing in Germany, told us sometime in 1989 or 1990 that Germany would not reunite.

So they're just human too, it seems!

Regards,
Donald
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Post by jbuck919 » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:27 pm

RebLem wrote:
Teresa B wrote:Hi Y'all,
Accents and figures of speech may vary a bit more than the quiz indicates. My husband, who grew up in Missouri, says "worsh" and I always said "wash" although I am a native Floridian.

The predominant accent here in central Florida is tinged with southern, but not strongly. We can't seem to resist using "y'all" and draggin' out our vaa-wels a little, but we use hard R's (much less genteel than the lovely Virginia softened ones). And you haven't lived 'til you've heard a Cuban-southern accent. 8)
Teresa
Another thing I've noticed over the years is that lots of Southerners, especially, it seems to me, Georgians, pronounce "important" as if it were spelled "impordant."
What, you never heard of the (fill in the blank) who walked into the doctor's office for his vasectomy in white tie and tails. His explanation? If I'm gonn be impohtent, I want to look impohtent.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Ralph » Fri Jun 08, 2007 7:08 am

Time to read Shaw's "Pygmalion."
Image

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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:20 pm

RebLem wrote:Another thing I've noticed over the years is that lots of Southerners, especially, it seems to me, Georgians, pronounce "important" as if it were spelled "impordant."
The "d" for "t" substitution is alive and well in the South. When we first moved to Virginia, Georgian accents were particularly distinguishable to my ear.
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