KRAZY KAT

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dulcinea
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KRAZY KAT

Post by dulcinea » Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:33 am

I read a comic book of that character in the 60s; my English was half-baked then, so I didn't quite understand it. How do you rate this very famous comic? Nowadays, it seems that the idea of a female regarding bricks thrown at her head as tokens of love is considered very disturbing--almost as a parable of battered woman syndrome.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:38 am

Many of the classic cartoon characters were in scenarios that should have been offensive then and are now. Krazy Kat was never one of my favorites but I remember the character well.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Wed Jul 25, 2007 8:41 am

Lil angel.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:15 pm

Krazy Kat is in the top-five (in the hearts & minds of Many, still Numero Uno) comic strips ever. George Herriman influenced countless generations with his way of pacing & shaping a strip--particularly those color Sunday strips, with their astounding senses of composition. And THIS, from a by-and-large intuitive cartoonist. He created his own universe.

Any cartoonist thereafter who "took after" him was just a clone.

In my personal echelon--and not necessarily in this order--the greatest strips were (see if you know any of these):
Charles Schultz's Peanuts
Gus Arriola's Gordo
George Herriman's Krazy Kat
Walt Kelly's Pogo
George McManus' Bringing Up Father (Maggie & Jiggs)
(with considerable regret, I've left Al Capp [Li'l Abner] off here)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:22 pm

....and Krazy & her gang were just another bunch who added luster to Hearst's KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, ensuring its (still current) status as the greatest of all comics syndicates.

Remember those atrocious early-60s TV cartoons of KFS' comics stable, with not only Krazy, but Snuffy Smith, Beetle Bailey and (all but disgracing his status as a formerly-funny animation star) Popeye?

Ruth Buzzi voiced Krazy; Allan Melvin voiced, I believe, Offisa Pup (Melvin was Sam the butcher on The Brady Bunch, and Archie's bigot pal Barney on All In The Family/Archie Bunker's Place).
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:27 pm

Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Wed Jul 25, 2007 10:34 pm

One of the issues this raises is the outrageous reliance on reruns of kiddy shows in the sixties. I shouldn't even know what Krazy Kat is, let alone the following:

Felix, the cat,
The wonderful wonderful cat.
Whenever he gets in a fix
He reaches into his bag of tricks.

Felix, the cat,
The wonderful, wonderful cat.
You'll laugh so hard your sides will ache,
Your heart will go pitter-pat
Watching Felix, the wonderful cat.

From memory, after 45 years, because music and words together are stored in a more permanent memory than either separately.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:12 am

ALSO:

American Composer JOHN ALDEN CARPENTER (still a figure in dire need of rediscovery) wrote a 15-minute ballet, Krazy Kat.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Jul 26, 2007 1:10 am

Ralph wrote:Many of the classic cartoon characters were in scenarios that should have been offensive then and are now.
Retroactive PC, aka presentism. It's bad enough dealing with it in the postive now.
Corlyss
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dulcinea
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Post by dulcinea » Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:51 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Ralph wrote:Many of the classic cartoon characters were in scenarios that should have been offensive then and are now.
Retroactive PC, aka presentism. It's bad enough dealing with it in the postive now.
That's precisely why I have posted this subject. Ever wondered how--to quote a very obvious example--GONE WITH THE WIND would have been if it had been filmed after the 50s, when the civil rights movement became genuinely influential?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Thu Jul 26, 2007 1:10 pm

Krazy Kat is an example of the comic strip rising to the level of art. It's not offensive but it can be unsettling and disturbing like other works of art. Great comedy is serious behind the laughter.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

SaulChanukah

Post by SaulChanukah » Thu Jul 26, 2007 10:42 pm

Hi there,

This is Saul posting in this thread, upholding my Pledge.
Yes even though I dont find this topic interesting at all, but a Pledge is a Pledge..

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Fri Jul 27, 2007 2:39 pm

And it's this neurotic political correctness that will forever mitigate against any contemporary comic strip being a bona fide or distinguished contribution to the art form.

But now, take the case of one of my Top Five: Gus Arriola's Gordo:
http://www.carmelart.org/artists_pages/ ... riola.html
There was a strip that (strangely) had controversy follow it throughout its history. It's strange because Arriola himself was a true Mexican-American (his mother was Caucasian, his father Mexican); he did have his characters talk in stereotypical "ee" dialect at the very beginning, but early on (the 1950s) he did eliminate most of this because he was well aware that he was depicting his people. But this wasn't at the expense of artistry, and this is why virtually every newer strip you see today looks dull and boring in comparison. Arriola's graphic style--wedded to his matchless verbal wit--was astonishing.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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