CSO MD search continues; Haitink “principal conductor”!

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CSO MD search continues; Haitink “principal conductor”!

Post by RebLem » Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:13 am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 27, 2006

BERNARD HAITINK APPOINTED AS PRINCIPAL CONDUCTOR OF THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

PIERRE BOULEZ NAMED AS CONDUCTOR EMERITUS OF THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Two internationally renowned conductors assume key leadership roles within CSO artistic team while music director search continues

The CSO Association today announced that it has appointed two of the world’s greatest conductors to titled positions with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Eminent Dutch conductor Bernard Haitink has been appointed as the Orchestra’s new Principal Conductor. Renowned French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez—the CSO’s current Helen Regenstein Principal Guest Conductor since 1995—has been named as Conductor Emeritus of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Both appointments will be effective at the start of the 2006-2007 season.

“The Chicago Symphony Orchestra family is very excited to celebrate both its newly formed relationship with Bernard Haitink and the continuation of its long standing relationship with Pierre Boulez,” said Deborah R. Card, President of the CSO Association. “Our strong commitment to maintaining the high quality of music making for which the CSO is known is further strengthened by the appointment of these two distinguished masters. We are thrilled that these gentlemen have agreed to collaborate with us as key members of the CSO’s artistic team.”

“As our music director search moves into its next phase, we are extremely pleased that Mr. Boulez and Mr. Haitink have accepted these new titled positions with the CSO. It is an honor to have musicians of such an extraordinary caliber working in these capacities,” said William H. Strong, Chairman of the CSO’s Board of Trustees and Chair of the CSO Music Director Search Committee. “Our search committee continues to find great inspiration in the knowledge that the best artists from around the world are so enthusiastic about working with our Orchestra. We remain energized in our music director search to select the best musical leader who is the right match for the CSO. We intend to take the time necessary to make a decision that will best serve our Orchestra and our city in the long term.”

“The Chicago Symphony Orchestra members who serve on the Music Director Search Committee are incredibly pleased with this announcement,” said CSO Assistant Principal Oboe Michael Henoch, on behalf of the musicians of the committee. “We hold Pierre Boulez in great esteem. For many years, he has conducted the CSO with the highest distinction as our Principal Guest Conductor. We are most grateful to him for the loyalty and dedication he has shown the Orchestra in agreeing to fulfill many administrative duties in coming seasons as well. Our admiration for Bernard Haitink has grown since he first conducted the Orchestra in 1976. He has always been a most welcomed guest conductor in ensuing years. Mr. Haitink’s latest residency this past winter confirmed that a very special relationship has developed between him and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. We look forward with great anticipation to our future music making with him.”

In his new role as Principal Conductor, Bernard Haitink will lead four to six weeks of CSO performances each season, starting in the 2007-2008 season, including subscription concerts at Symphony Center and tour performances. In addition to his Chicago appearances, Mr. Haitink will lead the Orchestra in future concerts at New York City’s Carnegie Hall, at the prestigious Lucerne Festival in Lucerne, Switzerland, and at London’s BBC Proms. His next scheduled dates with the CSO are in October 2006 when he will conduct the CSO, mezzo-soprano Michelle DeYoung, and the women of the Chicago Symphony Chorus in Mahler’s Symphony No. 3. He will also now return to Chicago in May 2007, leading the Orchestra in Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture, Lutoslawski’s Chain 2 with CSO Concertmaster Robert Chen as soloist, and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7. Mr. Haitink replaces Manfred Honeck for these performances.

Beginning in 2006-2007, as Conductor Emeritus of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez will conduct three to four weeks of CSO performances each season, including touring activities. As previously announced, the CSO will perform three concerts under his direction at Carnegie Hall this December 2006. These will be complemented by future Carnegie dates. Mr. Boulez next returns to the CSO podium in late November/December 2006 for performances of Mahler’s Symphony No. 7, Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin, Ravel’s Valses nobles et sentimentales, and Ligeti’s Piano Concerto with soloist Pierre-Laurent Aimard.

“The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is a truly great orchestra, with an extraordinary legacy and tradition. I am very proud to be a small part of that tradition, and I’m really looking forward to making music with these wonderful musicians,” said Bernard Haitink. Mr. Haitink made his debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in March 1976. He returned to Chicago over 20 years later to conduct subscription performances in January 1997. Most recently, Mr. Haitink led the CSO in a highly-successful two-week Chicago residency in March 2006.

“I am not only pleased, but deeply touched about being named Conductor Emeritus of the CSO,” said Mr. Boulez. “My gratitude and joy go far beyond the title itself because it means a lot to me to continue a fruitful collaboration with these wonderful musicians, and a team and organization of the first magnitude.” The Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s close relationship with Pierre Boulez began with his CSO conducting debut in 1969. Mr. Boulez returned to the Orchestra Hall podium in 1987, and began annual residencies with the CSO in 1991. He was named Principal Guest Conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1995. Since that time, his annual Chicago residencies have been much-anticipated events, exploring landmark works of the 20th century, providing fresh perspectives on established symphonic repertoire, and offering notable premieres of new works. The CSO/Boulez partnership has yielded dozens of commercial recordings, eight of which have been awarded Grammy® Awards.

Mr. Haitink and Mr. Boulez will provide input as to the overall artistic growth of the CSO. Mr. Haitink will lend his expertise and ideas on artistic matters. Beginning in 2006-2007, Mr. Boulez will assume additional behind-the-scenes responsibilities, working with the musicians of the Orchestra and management team, participating in auditions for open positions, and assisting with personnel issues as they arise.

Looking ahead, music making with Bernard Haitink and Pierre Boulez will serve as the foundation for exciting future CSO seasons. Further reflecting efforts to build strong, continuing relationships with great artists, an outstanding roster of internationally acclaimed guest conductors will join the CSO in 2007-2008, including but not limited to (in alphabetical order): Semyon Bychkov, Myung-Whun Chung, Christoph von Dohnányi, Charles Dutoit, Mark Elder, John Elliot Gardiner, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Riccardo Muti, Kent Nagano, Antonio Pappano, David Robertson, Mstislav Rostropovich, Esa-Pekka Salonen, and Michael Tilson Thomas. In addition to tours with Mr. Boulez and Mr. Haitink, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra will embark on a two-week European tour under the direction of Riccardo Muti in fall 2007. Full details for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s 2007-2008 season, including artists, concert programs, and tour itineraries will be announced in February 2007.

* * * *

With an international conducting career that has spanned more than five decades, Amsterdam-born Bernard Haitink (b. March 4, 1929) is one of today’s most celebrated conductors. Mr. Haitink has led many of the world’s top orchestras, including 25 years at the helm of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam as its music director (1964-1988) and frequent guest appearances with both the Berlin and Vienna philharmonic orchestras. He is currently honorary conductor of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, conductor emeritus of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and an honorary member of the Berlin Philharmonic. In addition to his long time leadership role with the Concertgebouw, Mr. Haitink has previously held posts as music director of the Dresden Staatskapelle (2002-2004), the Royal Opera, Covent Garden (1988-2002), Glyndebourne Festival Opera (1978-1988), and the London Philharmonic (1967-1979).

Mr. Haitink has recorded widely for the Phillips, Decca, and EMI labels, including complete cycles of Mahler, Bruckner, Brahms, and Schumann symphonies with the Concertgebouw and extensive repertoire with the Berlin and Vienna philharmonic orchestras and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. His discography also includes many opera recordings with the Royal Opera and Glyndebourne, as well as with the Bavarian Radio Orchestra and Dresden Staatskapelle. Mr. Haitink’s recording of Janácek’s Jenufa with the orchestra, soloists, and chorus of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden received a Grammy® Award for best opera recording in 2004. Mr. Haitink has received many international awards in recognition of his services to music, including an honorary KBE and Companion of Honour in the United Kingdom, and the House Order of Orange-Nassau in the Netherlands.

Born in Montbrison, France, Pierre Boulez (b. March 26, 1925) is one of the most distinguished composers and conductors in the world today. Through his own compositions, acclaimed performances, and extensive teaching and writing activities, he has made a decisive contribution to the development of music in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Pierre Boulez began his conducting career in 1958. His reputation as a leading musician brought him to the attention of conductor George Szell, who invited him to make his U.S. conducting debut with the Cleveland Orchestra. Mr. Boulez was principal guest conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra from 1969 until 1972. In 1971, he was named chief conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra; that same year, he was appointed music director of the New York Philharmonic, a position he held until 1977. Throughout his career, he has been a welcomed guest conductor with great orchestras and esteemed musical festivals around the world.

Mr. Boulez returned to France in 1974, at the invitation of the French government, as creator and director of a new music research center at the Pompidou Center. From the Institut de Recherche et de Coordination Acoustique/Musique (IRCAM) sprang the creation of an acclaimed instrumental group, the Ensemble Intercontemporain, one of the world’s greatest contemporary music ensembles, which Mr. Boulez conducts regularly in France and abroad. He is also co-founder of Cité de la Musique, a recently created music center in Paris. Recordings by Pierre Boulez have been awarded 26 Grammy® Awards, including eight with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus.

Founded in 1891, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra is consistently hailed as one of the greatest orchestras in the world. In collaboration with the best conductors and guest artists on the international music scene, the CSO performs well over one hundred concerts each year at its downtown home, Symphony Center, and at the Ravinia Festival on Chicago’s North Shore, where it is in residency each summer. The CSO’s comprehensive education and community programs engage more than 90,000 Chicago-area residents annually. Music lovers outside Chicago enjoy the sounds of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra through best-selling recordings and frequent sold-out tour performances in the United States and around the globe. Since 1971, the CSO has undertaken 32 international tours: 24 to Europe, five to the Far East, as well as one each to Russia, Australia, and South America. Recordings by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra have been awarded 58 Grammy® Awards from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, more than any other orchestra in the world.
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Post by RebLem » Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:33 am

I don't know why the module keeps on with the &q at the end of the headline. I tried to correct it twice and replace it with a quotation mark, but the program simply will not allow it.
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Post by Ralph » Fri Apr 28, 2006 7:01 am

RebLem wrote:I don't know why the module keeps on with the &q at the end of the headline. I tried to correct it twice and replace it with a quotation mark, but the program simply will not allow it.
*****

It's very annoying - you can't end a threat title, even a short one, with a quotation mark.
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Post by Ralph » Fri Apr 28, 2006 7:02 am

Well, we'll see what kind of commitment these two will bring to Chicago.
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Post by Barry » Fri Apr 28, 2006 9:32 am

Ralph wrote:Well, we'll see what kind of commitment these two will bring to Chicago.
When you add up the number of weeks the two will conduct each season, it still doesn't equal the number of weeks a music director generally spends with an orchestra.

It's basically just two principal guest conductors.
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Fri Apr 28, 2006 1:24 pm

What a powerhouse team of conductors! Lucky Chicago.

Haitink's recording of Vaughan Williams Symphony # 5 is supreme; it would be nice to hear him conduct this in Chicago.

And Boulez' recording of Mahler # 3 with Vienna on DG is outstanding.
He also has an outstanding Debussey recording with the Cleveland Orchestra on DG that I highly recommend.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:44 pm

Ralph wrote:
RebLem wrote:I don't know why the module keeps on with the &q at the end of the headline. I tried to correct it twice and replace it with a quotation mark, but the program simply will not allow it.
*****

It's very annoying - you can't end a threat title, even a short one, with a quotation mark.
I never noticed that before. As sys admin, I can edit any post on the board. So I took the liberty of adding an exclamation mark at the end of Reb's topic title. Apparently the program likes punctuation at the end of a title.
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Post by Lance » Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:49 pm

Well, before Corlyss added the exclamation point, I went in and changed the end of the line to quotation marks and it took just fine. It must've been a fluke. I had no problem in making it happen.
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Post by RebLem » Fri Apr 28, 2006 8:20 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Ralph wrote:
RebLem wrote:I don't know why the module keeps on with the &q at the end of the headline. I tried to correct it twice and replace it with a quotation mark, but the program simply will not allow it.
*****

It's very annoying - you can't end a threat title, even a short one, with a quotation mark.
I never noticed that before. As sys admin, I can edit any post on the board. So I took the liberty of adding an exclamation mark at the end of Reb's topic title. Apparently the program likes punctuation at the end of a title.
Lance wrote:Well, before Corlyss added the exclamation point, I went in and changed the end of the line to quotation marks and it took just fine. It must've been a fluke. I had no problem in making it happen.

:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

quote="Barry Z"]
Ralph wrote:Well, we'll see what kind of commitment these two will bring to Chicago.
When you add up the number of weeks the two will conduct each season, it still doesn't equal the number of weeks a music director generally spends with an orchestra.

It's basically just two principal guest conductors.[/quote]

Yeah, I noticed that, too. I'm still asking, "Why not Andre Previn?"
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Post by rogch » Sat Apr 29, 2006 8:17 am

Even though i consider myself a Bernard Haitink fan i very much doubt if this new appointment is a good idea for the orchestra or for Haitink himself. One thing is to play with European orchestras which he is very familiar with. But at his age to start a working relationship with an orchestra on the other side of the Atlantic which he has not directed often in the past? The CSO is a great orchestra that can adjust itself to many conductors and they will probably do very well. But if something new is likely to come out of this cooperation is antother question. The most likely reportoire is from the romantic period and it will be hard both for Haitink and the CSO to match or improve their previous distinguished preformances. But i will be very glad if my reservations are proven vrong.

I am more positive about Bolez, but i don't know how heavy his schedule is for the moment. But he has worked much with the CSO in the past and is also more likely to expand their reportoire if he wants to do so and has the time and energy needed. If he wants to do new preformances of Bartok and Mahler it will be very hard to match the CSO and Boulez' earlier achievements. But he can add other works, his own for example.
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Post by Haydnseek » Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:22 am

Haitink has been principal guest conductor and now conductor emeritus in Boston for more than 10 years and I understand he has been quite popular with both musicians and audiences (I love the Ravel recordings they made.) It seems to me that Haitink and Boulez were hired as caretakers until a Music Director can be chosen, a process that is apparently more difficult than selecting a Pope. Boulez knows the CSO very well (I have their excellent Bartok series) and Haitink always seems to draw out the best from musicians, even in times of turmoil like he had at Covent Garden. I hope in the end the CSO gets up the nerve to hire one of the younger American conductors who have been successful in Europe.
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Post by rogch » Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:50 am

Haydnseek wrote:Haitink has been principal guest conductor and now conductor emeritus in Boston for more than 10 years and I understand he has been quite popular with both musicians and audiences (I love the Ravel recordings they made.)
I am glad to hear that, i did not know he had worked with the Boston SO. And if he is successfull in Chicago i will be eager to hear them.
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Post by RebLem » Sat Apr 29, 2006 12:08 pm

rogch wrote:
Haydnseek wrote:Haitink has been principal guest conductor and now conductor emeritus in Boston for more than 10 years and I understand he has been quite popular with both musicians and audiences (I love the Ravel recordings they made.)
I am glad to hear that, i did not know he had worked with the Boston SO. And if he is successfull in Chicago i will be eager to hear them.
As the press release I posted indicated, Haitink has worked with the CSO before, beginning in 1976. There was a long hiatus, however, and the relationship apparently resumed in the 1990's and he has been a fairly frequent guest conductor since.

I remember attending one of his first series of concerts in 1976. I forget the complete contents of the program, but I remember the concert included a very impressive performance on the Shostakovich 4th Sym.

As for Boulez, the comments here seem to suggest that the posters are unaware of the fact that 2 of the Boulez Mahler DGG recordings (Syms 1 & 9) are with the Chicago Symphony. The First is now my favorite recording of the First (it was formerly the Levine, LSO) The Boulez Mahler 2, with the VPO, is due to be released sometime in May, 2006; that leaves only the 8th to complete the cycle.
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Post by RebLem » Sat Apr 29, 2006 3:03 pm

I just got an email notice from the CSO containing a list of all the concerts for the 2006/7 season, and it offers some tantalizing insights into who may be in the running for MD.

If you could tell from the number of programs someone is scheduled to conduct who the next MD would be, it would clearly be David Zinman, the only person scheduled to conduct more than 2 programs. 35 programs are scheduled for the season, and Zinman is to be the conductor of 3 of them, specifically, #s 16, 17 (FEB) and 34 (JUN) #16 consists of Golijov's Last Round, Elgar's VC with Gil Shaham, and the Schumann Sym 2. #17 is J Strauss's Blue Danube Waltz, R Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra, and two Ligeti pieces--Lontano & Atmospheres. # 34 is the Verdi Requiem.

Boulez is scheduled for 2 programs, #s 11 & 12. #11 is the Mahler 7th, and # 12 is Ravel's Valses nobles et sentimantales, Bartok's Miraculous Mandarin, and Ligeti's Piano Concerto. So, it looks to me like a Ligeti CD from someone may be in the offing, what with 3 Ligeti pieces being on the schedule for the season.

It looks to me like Myung-Whun Chung is also in the running. He is to conduct programs # 2 & 33, but the works involved seem to have such a wide range that it looks like he is one of the serious candidates. # 2 consists of the Verdi La forza del destino overture, the Beethoven 6th and the Shostakovich 5th. How is that for some raw meat? And in program #33, he is doing Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet Suite, and two works Boulez has done with the orchestra in recent years, Messiaen's L'Ascension and Ravel's Daphnis & Chloe Suite #2. Could it be that these are the tests to see whether he meets the standards of Haitink in concert #2 and Boulez in concert #33? You really have to read between the lines here.

Then there is a fellow I have never heard of before--Miguel Harth-Bedoya, who is scheduled for concerts # 3 & # 25. Concert #3 includes 3 works, which could be seen as tests of at least 3 areas of competence. There are, first of all, Ravel's La Valse and Saint-Saens Organ Symphony with organist David Schrader, both of which test his abilities in standard French repertoire, and, in the sym, the ability to work with a soloist. He is also, in this concert, being entrusted with the world premiere of a work commissioned by the CSO, a weighty responsibility indeed--a new Trombone Concerto by Lindberg with trombonist Charles Vernon, which tests his ability to a) learn new repertoire, b) work with a soloist, and c) work with a composer. Would a conductor be tested in all these areas if he were not being considered for an important job?

Furthermore, there is Harth-Bedoya's concert #25. In this concert, he will be working with a man who may be the third evaluator after Haitink and Boulez--Yo Yo Ma. Ma has been working with the CSO on what he calls his Silk Road Project, an exercise in musical multi-culturalism, as I understand it, and all the works in the program are part of that project and are to be performed by the Silk Road Ensemble, with Ma as a soloist in Bloch's Schelomo. The rest of the program consists of Harrison's Pipa Concerto, Enescu's Romanian Rhapsody 1, and a traditional work, Ambush from Ten Sides. Very curious. Anyone here know anything about Harth-Bedoya?

Paavo Jarvi is scheduled for concerts 4 & 10. Tuur: Zeitraum, Mahler: Des Knaben Wunderhorn, & the Shostakovich 10th in #4, &, in #10, the Gershwin Piano Concerto with Wayne Marshall (anyone know anything about him?) and two Concertos for Orchestra, by Kodaly and Lutoslawski, respectively. From the works scheduled, it doesn't look like he is a serious contender, but who knows?

Charles Dutoit is to conduct programs 22 & 23. Ravel's Le tombeau de Couperin, Prokofiev's PC 2 with Yuja Wang, and Rimsky-Korsakov's Sheherezade in #22, and Wagner's Flying Dutchman Overture, Goldmark's VC with Hilary Hahn, and the Tchaikovsky 6th in #23. Doesn't sound like much, but it is work with two soloists, an important test, and two pieces of standard Russian repertoire. and a third (the Prokofiev) which is notoriously difficult to make any sense of, so who knows?

Alan Gilbert is the only other conductor scheduled for more than 1 concert, # 30 & # 31. In #30, he is to do two works by John Adams--Tromba lontana, and Century Rolls for Piano & Orch. Also the Takemitsu Requiem and the Prokofiev Scythian Suite. #31 consists of McPhee: Tabuh-tabuhan, Ravel's Mother Goose, and Copland's Sym 3.

Some other highlights for 1 concert conductors--#8 features David Robertson conducting Purcell's Chacony in G Minor, Bartok's VC 2 with Leonidas Kavakos, and the Brahms Sym 4.

A conductor named Steven Sloane is to appear with The Lincoln Center Jazz Orch and Wynton Marsalis and the CSO Chorus in a program? piece? by Marsalis called ALL RISE--program # 14.

Semyon Bychkov in program 18 conducts Dutilleux's Metaboles, Prokofiev's VC 2 with Rachel Lee, and Strauss's An Alpine Symphony.

In #19, Philippe Jordan does Faure's Pelleas Sute, Ravel's Sheherezade with Susan Graham, and the Franck D Minor Sym.

In concert 21, Mitsuko Uchida does double duty as pianist and conductor in the Mozart PC 20, the Serenade # 11, and the Bach Brandenburg 5.

Program 24 features Gustavo Dudamel conducting Castellanos: Santa Cruz de Pacairigua, Bruch's VC 1, and the Mahler 1st. Sounds like somebody Barenboim might be helping along.

Program 26 features conductor Andrey Boreyko in 3 works, the last 3 of which look like tests--Mozart Sym 34, the Schumann PC with Helene Grimaud, and Messiaen's Un sourire.

Program 28 has Kent Nagano doing Rihm's Das Lesen der Schrift and the Brahms Requiem.

Christoph von Dohnanyi conducts the all Brahms Program 32--the Sym 3, and the VC with Vadim Repin.

And finally, the last concert of the season has Herbert Blomstedt doing the Beethoven 9th.

There seems to be a lot of things on this year's programs that Boulez might want to record, especially a whole raft of things by Messiaen. Want to bet we get a Messiaen project from Boulez out of this? And part of the test may be for Boulez to see how well these various guest conductors have prepared the orchestra in the works he intends to record.

Zinman looks like the front runner, but there seem to be all kinds of tests going on here in this season. It looks like it was well planned to separate the wheat from the chaff.
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Post by hautbois » Sun Apr 30, 2006 8:41 am

I do not know of Miguel Harth-Bedoya, but it seems from Lindberg's website that he is there because there arent any other conductors who are 'free' at that moment.

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Post by RebLem » Sun Apr 30, 2006 1:17 pm

Ok, I decided to do a Google search on Miguel Harth-Bedoya. Brilliant, innovative idea, eh? I knew you'd agree. :lol:

Turns out he is a Peruvian conductor who has been MD of the Fort Worth Sym Orch since 2000, and a damned handsome devil he is, too. He has done a number of recordings, some information about which, along with a long bio, is to be found at his website.


http://www.miguelharth-bedoya.com/
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Post by Ralph » Sun Apr 30, 2006 8:33 pm

Chicago Symphony Names Haitink And Boulez to Conducting Posts

By Tim Page
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, April 28, 2006; C02

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra yesterday named two legendary music figures to key artistic leadership roles, postponing the necessity of finding an immediate replacement for music director Daniel Barenboim, who has announced that he will leave in June.

Bernard Haitink, probably the best-known Dutch maestro since the heyday of Willem Mengelberg 75 years ago, will become the CSO's principal conductor, with the French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez named as conductor emeritus. Both appointments are effective at the start of the 2006-2007 season.

Haitink will lead four to six weeks of CSO performances each season, starting in 2007-2008, including subscription concerts at Symphony Center and tours to Carnegie Hall, the Lucerne Festival and the BBC Proms. Boulez will conduct three to four weeks of performances and also will tour with the orchestra.

The announcement, issued late yesterday afternoon, would seem to rule out any possibility of the ascension to music director of Washington's own Leonard Slatkin, who has made no secret of his aspirations for that position when he departs the National Symphony Orchestra at the end of the 2007-2008 season. Slatkin has appeared regularly with the CSO as a guest conductor this year, usually under last-minute circumstances, and even went so far as to give an interview to the Chicago Tribune explaining the "terms" under which he would take the helm.

Instead, the orchestra offered a list of more than a dozen names of conductors with whom it wished to "build strong, continuing relationships," including Semyon Bychkov, Christoph von Dohnanyi, Charles Dutoit, Valery Gergiev, Kent Nagano, David Robertson, Mstislav Rostropovich, Esa-Pekka Salonen and Michael Tilson Thomas.

In addition to its work with Boulez and Haitink, the orchestra will make a two-week tour of Europe under the direction of Riccardo Muti in fall 2007. Muti is believed to be the top choice for music director among the musicians, but he is prohibitively expensive and unlikely to want to take on another American music directorship after his tenure in Philadelphia in the 1980s. Because Haitink is already in his late seventies and Boulez turned 81 this year, their appointments are not seen as a long-term solution.
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Post by Harold Tucker » Mon May 01, 2006 9:07 am

Reblem asked about Wayne Marshall. He played "Rhapsody in Blue" with Jarvi and Cincinnati last weekend. I would say that it was a performance far more informed by the Paul Whiteman original than later Hollywood wallowings. Even in the Ferde Grofe trappings it was swift, jerky and loaded with a lot of snap crackle and pop.

Here is the info from the CSO bio:
Wayne Marshall, piano
Making his Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra debut is Wayne Marshall, a prominent pianist, organist, conductor and composer who was named “Artist of the Year” by BBC Music Magazine in 1998.

Wayne Marshall was born in the United Kingdom and, after musical studies there and in Vienna, swiftly established an international reputation as organist and pianist. He is now also in great demand as conductor and duo recitalist. Other musical activities include improvisation, jazz, radio and television presentation and composition. As solo pianist, his repertoire includes the complete works of Gershwin for piano and orchestra to works by Ravel, Bernstein, Stravinsky and Franck. A regular visitor to the BBC Proms, Mr. Marshall has appeared as both organ and piano soloist and made his Proms conducting debut in 1998 with Porgy and Bess (in a Gershwin centenary tribute).

As organ recitalist he draws on an exceptionally large and varied repertoire and has appeared widely throughout the UK, Europe, North America and the Far East. Recent recitals included the inauguration of the new organ in Los Angeles’ new Disney Hall, and a recital at Westminster Abbey. In October 2004 he earned critical acclaim for his performance in the premiere of James MacMillan’s organ concerto, A Scotch Bestiary, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Esa-Pekka Salonen in Disney Hall.

Mr. Marshall maintains a busy conducting schedule with the major orchestras of Europe and Asia. He has shown a particular flair for conducting American musicals and operettas such as Wonderful Town (Austrian Radio Symphony in his Vienna debut and also his Rotterdam Philharmonic debut); Guys & Dolls (also with the Austrian Radio Symphony); Porgy and Bess (Rotterdam Philharmonic) and West Side Story at the Bregenz Festival.

With Kim Criswell, the eminent singing actress, Mr. Marshall has participated in orchestral projects and recitals in Berlin, Hong Kong, Italy and London. He also gives regular violin/piano recitals with Tasmin Little and occasional trumpet/organ and trumpet/piano recitals with Ole Edvard Antonsen. The 2002 Braunschweig Festival presented “Wayne Marshall and Friends,” in which all of these duos appeared, and he returned for a similar project in 2003. He also performs recitals with Willard White.

Wayne Marshall is Organist-in-Residence of Manchester's Bridgewater Hall. In addition to consultation over programming, he is closely involved with the Hall’s audience development, education and outreach programs. In 2004 Mr. Marshall was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by Bournemouth University in recognition of his longstanding relationship with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.

Mr. Marshall has recorded for many labels, among them EMI Classics, Virgin Classics, Philips Classics, Delos and Blue Note. Notable releases as conductor/soloist include two highly-praised Gershwin discs with the Aalborg Symphony. His many recordings of piano with orchestra include Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and Second Rhapsody with the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra under John Mauceri, and a Bernstein album with Paavo Järvi and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Solo piano releases include I Got Rhythm and Gershwin Song Book (which earned an ECHO/Deutscher Schallplattenpreis award), and releases as organist include solo recital CDs. His most recent releases include his Berlin Philharmonic/Abbado Hindemith Kammermusik No. 7.
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Post by RebLem » Tue May 02, 2006 10:27 pm

TY, Mr. Tucker. :)

I have mentioned elsewhere several times that I thought Andre Previn would be a good MD. No one has responded in any way to this. Is he unavailable for some reason? I don't think he is institutionally committed at the moment.
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Post by pizza » Wed May 03, 2006 12:30 am

RebLem wrote:
I have mentioned elsewhere several times that I thought Andre Previn would be a good MD. No one has responded in any way to this. Is he unavailable for some reason? I don't think he is institutionally committed at the moment.
Didn't know he had problems requiring intermittent institutional care! :shock: If so, the CSO would be an excellent place for him! :wink:

Seriously, Previn is an excellent all-round musician and would do a fine job. The problem is that he's an American and the CSO is rooted in European tradition. That's probably why Zinman won't be seriously considered, among other worthy candidates as well.

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Post by Lance » Wed May 03, 2006 1:28 am

RebLem wrote:TY, Mr. Tucker. :)

I have mentioned elsewhere several times that I thought Andre Previn would be a good MD. No one has responded in any way to this. Is he unavailable for some reason? I don't think he is institutionally committed at the moment.
Having had the opportunity of seeing/hearing André Previn conduct ... the last time with the Boston SO at Tanglewood, I was not overly impressed. No one can take away his musical genius as a pianist/conductor/composer/arranger/jazz musician, but I can't see him taking on the Chicago SO. It just doesn't seem like the perfect fit, perhaps personality-wise. He's done fine in Pittsburgh and in London. I guess I am too "Reinerized" and think someone like Reiner might be a better fit. [Who, today, could possibly be like Reiner? Nobody.] I think Haitink would do well, as he has already proven. Further, I can't imagine Previn wanting to take on a major orchestra with all that implies at this point in his life. The man was born in 1929, which means he will be 80 in 2009, which isn't very far away. On the other hand, being at the helm of the CSO might well be his crowning achievement. Then, too, if Monteux, Stokowski, and a host of others assumed positions at this age, why not Previn? Yes, I'm vacillating. Tough decision. But then, who else is there? Frankly, I think Zinman might be a good fit. Who else is there?
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Post by Lance » Wed May 03, 2006 1:31 am

Lance wrote:
RebLem wrote:TY, Mr. Tucker. :)

I have mentioned elsewhere several times that I thought Andre Previn would be a good MD. No one has responded in any way to this. Is he unavailable for some reason? I don't think he is institutionally committed at the moment.
Having had the opportunity of seeing/hearing André Previn conduct ... the last time with the Boston SO at Tanglewood, I was not overly impressed. No one can take away his musical genius as a pianist/conductor/composer/arranger/jazz musician, but I can't see him taking on the Chicago SO. It just doesn't seem like the perfect fit, perhaps personality-wise. He's done fine in Pittsburgh and in London. I guess I am too "Reinerized" and think someone like Reiner might be a better fit. [Who, today, could possibly be like Reiner? Nobody.] I think Haitink would do well, as he has already proven himself in many places and with many orchestras. Further, I can't imagine Previn wanting to take on a major orchestra with all that implies at this point in his life. The man was born in 1929, which means he will be 80 in 2009, which isn't very far away. On the other hand, being at the helm of the CSO might well be his crowning achievement. Then, too, if Monteux, Stokowski, and a host of other conductors assumed positions at this age (and later), why not Previn? Yes, I'm vacillating. Tough decision. But then, who else is there? Frankly, I think Zinman might be a good fit. Who else is there?
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Post by pizza » Wed May 03, 2006 8:00 am

Who else? There are excellent conductors who haven't even been mentioned or considered. There's Neeme Jarvi, Richard Bonynge, Zubin Mehta and Charles Dutoit among the older, better-known musicians. Then there's Jan Pascal Tortelier, Thomas Sanderling, David Alan Miller and Paavo Jarvi among the "younger" set. Even Valeri Gergiev or Riccardo Chailly might be induced if the stars are in the right configuration. All of these men are fine, experienced musicians who would probably perform very well.

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Post by Heck148 » Wed May 03, 2006 9:30 am

pizza wrote:Who else? There are excellent conductors who haven't even been mentioned or considered.
there are some Americans worth considering - Zinman has already been mentioned..

James Conlon, Robt Spano for example. I'm not toofamiliar with Spano - but conlon did a Mahler Sym#9 with the CSO a few years back that was really outstanding. I tuned in part way thru mvt I, and latched right on...I didn't know who was conducting until the very end...it was wonderful.

I've heard some other things from him as well, and was generally favorably impressed.

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Post by Barry » Wed May 03, 2006 9:34 am

I said on another board that I don't think Zinman will be seriously considered because of his age. I think he's in his early 70s. If they wanted him as a music director, they would have just given him the job now instead of hiring a couple other guys in their 70s to conduct a few concerts each per season while they continue their longterm search.

When it comes to hiring a real music director who will spend 12-14 weeks per season in Chicago, along with having administrative duties, I think they'll want someone at least a little younger than Zinman so they don't have to go through the entire process again in a few more years.

Muti is scheduled to take them on a European tour next season. If things go very well and he hits it off with the musicians, I wouldn't be surprised to see him get an offer (unless NYC makes him one first).
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed May 03, 2006 11:07 am

pizza wrote:Who else? There are excellent conductors who haven't even been mentioned or considered. There's Neeme Jarvi, Richard Bonynge, Zubin Mehta and Charles Dutoit among the older, better-known musicians. Then there's Jan Pascal Tortelier, Thomas Sanderling, David Alan Miller and Paavo Jarvi among the "younger" set. Even Valeri Gergiev or Riccardo Chailly might be induced if the stars are in the right configuration. All of these men are fine, experienced musicians who would probably perform very well.
Chicago can't have Paavo Jarvi - he belongs to Cincinnati! :)
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Post by Haydnseek » Wed May 03, 2006 11:46 am

Regarding the Music Director opening in Chicago: there is both good news and bad. The good news is that many of the top conductors are available. The bad news is that Houston Texans owner Bob McNair is chairman of the search committee.
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Post by RebLem » Thu May 04, 2006 11:14 am

Maybe the CSO could hire the whole Chung family and save some money doing everything in-house, with n'ary a guest soloist, except for singers, of course. :evil: :D :roll: :D :twisted:
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Post by jbuck919 » Thu May 04, 2006 12:45 pm

What concerns me is that, with my record of on-again-off-again attention to the contemporary music-making scene, I keep hearing the same names among conductors after 20, 25, even 30 and sometimes more years. Not that I don't congratulate them on having a vocation that promises great fulfillment and productivity well into a long life, but I am literally hearing the same names now (all the time) that I did when I was a kid, and I was not a kid yesterday. I know of a few exceptions, very famous and I will not bother to mention them as they are the same ones that are known to everyone, but we do seem to have something of a gerontocracy on our hands.

This is not true of soloists, either instrumental or vocal. There seems to be a phenomenon of replenishment there that I do not see in the world of conductors. One could find it worrisome, no?

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Post by pizza » Thu May 04, 2006 1:04 pm

Soloists obviously have more opportunities to strut their stuff than do conductors.

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Post by jbuck919 » Thu May 04, 2006 1:26 pm

pizza wrote:Soloists obviously have more opportunities to strut their stuff than do conductors.
Agreed, and I would add that in the case of vocal soloists they simply have shorter life spans. I don't expect to be hearing about Joan Sutherland and Beverly Sills in their latest triumph.

Well, Pizza, consider your much longer listening experience (intended as a compliment). Can you think of a time when there was so much "onhangingness" as the Germans might say? Maybe you can; I'm not trying to ambush you. It just seems weird to me to be 51 and hearing the same names I heard when I was 16 when they were already famous principal conductors of world-class orchestras. And if I was not as young as 16 for some of them, 25 will do to seem weird enough.

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Post by pizza » Thu May 04, 2006 2:01 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
pizza wrote:Soloists obviously have more opportunities to strut their stuff than do conductors.
Agreed, and I would add that in the case of vocal soloists they simply have shorter life spans. I don't expect to be hearing about Joan Sutherland and Beverly Sills in their latest triumph.

Well, Pizza, consider your much longer listening experience (intended as a compliment). Can you think of a time when there was so much "onhangingness" as the Germans might say? Maybe you can; I'm not trying to ambush you. It just seems weird to me to be 51 and hearing the same names I heard when I was 16 when they were already famous principal conductors of world-class orchestras. And if I was not as young as 16 for some of them, 25 will do to seem weird enough.
When I was but a youth :wink: I also heard the same names over and over again because conductors seemed to live on forever and tended to stay put: Toscanini, Beecham, Monteux, Koussevitzy, Szell, Stokowski, Ormandy, Stock; these guys were the heavy hitters of the era and job security was not a problem.

Actually, bass singers seem to have unusual productive longevity. If I'm not mistaken, Chaliapin was around for many years. And more recently, Leon Lishner cut his last record just before he died at age 82, still in fine voice. Could be the vocal chords of low register are less fragile.

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Post by jbuck919 » Thu May 04, 2006 2:47 pm

pizza wrote:
Actually, bass singers seem to have unusual productive longevity. If I'm not mistaken, Chaliapin was around for many years. And more recently, Leon Lishner cut his last record just before he died at age 82, still in fine voice. Could be the vocal chords of low register are less fragile.
I have heard the same thing, and William Warfield might be another good example, but I only say that because I heard him late in his career doing a Verdi Requiem. On the other hand, George London had a brief career and I am told that it was because he abused his voice.

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Post by RebLem » Thu May 04, 2006 6:52 pm

One reason the CSO might want an older MD has to do with its experience with Solti. I understand that early in his music directorship, Solti considered moving to Chicago. The first thing to do was to find a school for his children. He looked at private schools and public schools; New Trier High School in Highland Park is generally considered one of the best public schools in the US. However, Solti could not find a school that met his standards, which is why he never moved to Chicago.

Perhaps the CSO would like to hire an empty nester to avoid that problem.
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Post by anasazi » Fri May 05, 2006 12:02 am

Surely these are mostly ceremonial posts for both Haitink and Boulez, two very emminent conductors, but alas, both perhaps at a point where they are not able or willing to take on the role of MD.

The Chicago Symphony is one of the few celebrated orchestras standing in North America. I hope they find a music director worthy of the great musicians there.

No favorites here, unless by chance they could snag Salonen away from L.A. anyway. My advice to them: think young.
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