Great Stravinsky Recordings

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karlhenning
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Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by karlhenning » Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:29 am

Our esteemed neighbor paulb either misspoke, or misremembers, an alleged (and distressing, if it were true) absence of excellent recordings of Stravinsky.

With the understanding at the outset both that (a) not all excellent recordings of any great musical masterwork will (or should) make exactly the same interpretive choices, and therefore (b) the number of excellent recordings of Stravinsky will necessarily not be simply contained within any list of my own preferences . . . I will take up my list of 15 great Stravinsky masterworks (plus L'oiseau de feu)

Svadebka (Les noces)
Robt Craft, conducting (originally on Koch, now a Naxos reissue); the sopranos in the chorus here float on those high notes with purity and focus, soul-searingly beautiful
Jas Wood, conducting (a wonderful Hyperion disc)
Also excellent is the Ancerl Gold Supraphon reissue
Stravinsky's recording is better as a performance than the state of the recording reveals :-)

Orpheus
Craft, reissued on Naxos; absolutely superb.

The Mass
Jas Wood (above)
Jas O'Donnell, possibly my preferred recording as the choir has boy trebles (which IIRC Stravinsky inscribed as a preference in the score)
Ancerl
All these are excellent.

The Cantata
The Ancerl is miraculously good
There used to be a Reinbert de Leeuw recording on Argo which was quite good, although the tenor soloist was working a little too obviously hard in the tour-de-force setting of "Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day"

The Symphonies of Wind Instruments
Boulez on DG
Thierry Fischer and Netherlanders on Chandos
Dutoit/Montreal
All these excellent, though the Dutoit has fallen OOP I believe

The Concerto for Two Pianos
Frith and Hill on Naxos, superb

The Symphony in C
I'm still digging into this one, but I've been much enjoying the Michael Tilson Thomas recording with the LSO

Le sacre du printemps
Any number of excellent recordings, even by my lights (I tend to shy away from romanto-behemoth readings of this 'un)
Craft
Abbado/LSO
Muti/Phila on a tasty budget reissue
Dutoit/Montreal, though again, the pikers have let this fall OOP

Agon
The two recordings I have are no longer available, so I won't torment you with what cannot be attained.
I have heard the Craft well spoken of, and I should be very surprised if he did not do it excellently

The Canticum sacrum
All right, Paul, here's a work with entirely too few recordings available. But the one which is current, is magnificent:
The Jas O'Donnell on Hyperion as mentioned above.

Le baiser de la fée
Not nearly enough good recordings of this ballet (complete), either. The Craft is excellent, though again that was originally on Koch, and I don't know offhand if it has been reissued by Naxos

Perséphone
I have a BBC Proms live recording whose acquantaince I am still making, but it strikes me as mighty fine, mighty fine indeed.

Petrushka
The Symphony in Three Movements
No lack of great recordings of these, and with good reason!

The Octet
I haven't heard this one all that often; again, I like Thierry Fischer on Chandos.

L'oiseau de feu (complete)
There was a week I spent listening to practically nothing besides the Craft recording of this.
I've got a Boulez recording, too, somewhere, but I haven't trotted it out yet. I am simply that satisfied with the Craft. (At some point, yes, I will certainly listen to the Boulez :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by karlhenning » Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:36 am

Two addenda:

(1) Sorry I didn't make it clear, but this thread is a general invitation to name your beloved Stravinsky recordings in a humanitarian effort to assure Paul that Igor Fyodorovich has not in fact gone begging for excellent recordings.

(2) I can't believe that I listed 15 beloved Stravinsky works and omitted the Symphony of Psalms . . . but that just goes to show the strength of the Stravinsky catalogue, doesn't it?

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by MaestroDJS » Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:31 am

It may be a matter of taste, but I've been well pleased with this set. I bought most of these on their LP incarnations in the 1970s, and then bought this 22-CD set in the 1990s. Igor Stravinsky might not have been technically the best conductor, but as the composer he knew how his music should sound.

My favorite: Stravinsky's 1964 recording of his ballet Orpheus with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), Russia / United States:

The Recorded Legacy (in 12 Volumes): Igor Stravinsky, Robert Craft, conductors (Recorded 1934-1967). Sony Classical SX22K 46 290 (22 CDs). (United States)
* Volume I, Ballets: The Firebird (1); Scherzo à la russe(1); Scherzo fantastique(2); Fireworks(1); Pétrouchka(1); The Rite of Spring(1); Les Noces(3); Renard(4); L'Histoire du Soldat(4). (1)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (2)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (3)American Concert Choir, (3)Columbia Percussion Ensemble, (4)Columbia Chamber Ensemble / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SM3K 46 291 (3 CDs).

* Volume II, Ballets: Apollo(1); Agon(2); Jeu de Cartes(3); Scènes de ballet(4); Bluebird - Pas de deux(1); The Fairy's Kiss(1); Pulcinella(1); Orpheus(5). (1)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (2)Los Angeles Festival Symphony Orchestra, (3)Cleveland Orchestra, (4)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (5)Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SM3K 46 292 (3 CDs).

* Volume III, Ballet Suites: The Firebird; Pétrouchka; Pulcinella. Columbia Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SMK 46 293.

* Volume IV, Symphonies: Symphony in E-Flat(1); Symphony in C(2); Symphony in 3 Movements(1); Symphony of Psalms(2,3). (1)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (2)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (3)Festival Singers of Toronto / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SM2K 46 294 (2 CDs). + Stravinsky in rehearsal, Stravinsky in his own words.

* Volume V, Concertos: Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments(1); Movements for Piano and Orchestra(2); Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra(1,4); Concerto for Violin in D Major(3). (1)Philippe Entremont, (2)Charles Rosen, Piano; (3)Isaac Stern, Violin; Columbia Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, (4)Robert Craft, Conductor. Sony Classical SMK 46 295.

* Volume VI, Miniature Masterpieces: Greeting Prélude(1); Suites Nos. 1 and 2 for Small Orchestra(2); Concerto in E-Flat for Chamber Orchestra "Dumbarton Oaks"(3); 4 Norwegian Moods(2); Circus Polka(2); Concerto in D for String Orchestra "Basel Concerto"(1); 8 Instrumental Miniatures(2); 4 Études for Orchestra(2). (1)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (2)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (3)Columbia Chamber Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SMK 46 296.

* Volume VII, Chamber Music and Historical Recordings: Preludium for Jazz Ensemble(1); Concertino for Twelve Instruments(2); Octet for Wind Instruments(2); Ragtime for Eleven Instruments(2); Tango(1); Septet(2); Pastorale(2); Ebony Concerto(1,4); Symphonies d'instruments à vent(3); Duo Concertant for Violin and Piano(5,9); Serenade in A for Piano(9); Concerto for 2 Solo Pianos(6,9); Piano Rag Music(9); Sonata for 2 Solo Pianos(7); Sonata for Piano(8). (1)Columbia Jazz Ensemble, (2)Columbia Chamber Ensemble, (3)Symphonieorchester des Nordwestdeutschen Rundfunks / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor; (4)Benny Goodman, Clarinet, (5)Joseph Szigeti, Violin; (6)Soulima Stravinsky, (7)Arthur Gold & (7)Robert Fizdale, (8)Charles Rosen, (9)Igor Stravinsky, Piano. Sony Classical SM2K 46 297 (2 LPs).

* Volume VIII, Operas and Songs: Le Rossignol, Conte lyrique en 3 Actes; Mavra, Opera buffa in 1 Act; Faun and Shepherdess; 2 Poems of Paul Verlaine; 2 Poems of Konstantin Balmont; 3 Japanese Lyrics; 3 Little Songs (Recollections of My Childhood); Pribaoutki (Pleasant Songs); Cat's Cradle Songs; 4 Russian Peasant Songs; 4 Russian Songs; 3 Songs from William Shakespeare; In memoriam Dylan Thomas; Elegy for J.F.K.; The Owl and the ***; Tilim-bom. (1)Opera Society of Washington, (2)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (3)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (4)Columbia Chamber Orchestra, (5)Columbia Chamber Ensemble / Igor Stravinksy. Sony Classical SM2K 46 298 (2 CDs).

* Volume IX: The Rake's Progress, Opera in 3 Acts. Don Garrard, Bass; Judith Raskin, Soprano; Alexander Young, Tenor; John Reardon, Baritone; Jean Manning, Mezzo-Soprano; Regina Sarfaty, Mezzo-Soprano; Kevin Miller, Tenor; Peter Tracey, Bass; Sadler's Wells Opera Chorus; Royal Philharmonic Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, Conductor. Sony Classical SM2K 46 299 (2 CDs).

* Volume X, Operas and Melodramas: Oedipus Rex, Opera-Oratorio in 2 Acts(1); The Flood, A Musical Play(2,4); Perséphone, Mélodrame en 3 parties(2); Ode(3); Monumentum pro Gesualdo di Venosa ad CD annum(2). (1)Opera Society of Washington, (2)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (3)Cleveland Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky, (4)Robert Craft. Sony Classical SM2K 46 300 (2 CDs).

* Volume X, Sacred Works: Choralvariationen über das Weihnachtslied "Vom Himmel hoch, da komm' ich her" von Johnann Sebastian Bach(1); Zvezdoliki(1); Ave Maria; Credo; Pater noster; Cantata(2); Mass(3); Babel(1); Canticum sacrum (ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis)(4); Introitus(2); A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer(1); Anthem; Threni (id est lamentationes Jeremiae Prophetae(1). (1)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (2)Columbia Chamber Ensemble, (3)Columbia Symphony Winds & Brass, (4)Los Angeles Festival Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky. Sony Classical SM2K 46 301 (2 CDs).

* Volume XII, Robert Craft conducts: Chant du Rossignol(1); Danses concertantes(2); Epitaphium(3); Double Canon (Raoul Dufy in memoriam)(3); Abraham and Isaac(1); Variations (Aldous Huxley in memoriam)(1); Requiem Canticles(1). (1)Columbia Symphony Orchestra, (2)Columbia Chamber Orchestra, (3)Columbia Chamber Ensemble / Robert Craft. Sony Classical SMK 46302.
As a supplement, here's an interesting novelty, recorded live in excellent stereo sound in 1962 by Melodiya during Stravinsky's only return visit to Russia after the revolution.

Stravinsky in Moscow 1962. Pétrouchka Suite; Orpheus*; Ode*; Fireworks; Ey ukhnyem (Song of the Volga Boatmen)*. Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra; *USSR Philharmonic Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky. (Recorded September & October 1962). BMG Classics 74321 33220 2.

Dave

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Post by karlhenning » Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:52 am

MaestroDJS wrote:Igor Stravinsky might not have been technically the best conductor, but as the composer he knew how his music should sound.
. . . which begs the question, how often was it the case that his limitations as a conductor failed to result in a performance which matched "how his music should sound"?

(Also, the composer knowing how his music should sound is not (always) a fixed quantity, either.)
My favorite: Stravinsky's 1964 recording of his ballet Orpheus with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
Very interesting! I should like to hear this.
* Volume X, Sacred Works: Choralvariationen über das Weihnachtslied "Vom Himmel hoch, da komm' ich her" von Johnann Sebastian Bach(1); Zvezdoliki(1); Ave Maria; Credo; Pater noster; Cantata(2); Mass(3); Babel(1); Canticum sacrum (ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis)(4); Introitus(2); A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer(1); Anthem; Threni (id est lamentationes Jeremiae Prophetae(1). (1)CBC Symphony Orchestra, (2)Columbia Chamber Ensemble, (3)Columbia Symphony Winds & Brass, (4)Los Angeles Festival Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky. Sony Classical SM2K 46 301 (2 CDs).
(Dave, I'm guessing that this should be Vol XI, instead?)

And though these pieces could hardly go anywhere else, given how the 22-disc set is organized, "sacred works" is a dodgy heading for both Zvezdoliki (setting a mystical, incense-perfumed poem by Balmont) and the Cantata (which Stravinsky himself called "semi-sacred").

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by paulb » Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:27 am

Way to go Karl! This will be a great thread for stravinsky fans.
btw I did not know Petrushka was a sym, I'll have to revisit that one. I may have the Stokowski/EMI laying around here somewhere. I recall its a fine work.
But strange that i would go looking for something to play this morning and the Varese/Chailly/Decca set was slightly jettison out from the shelf....quite a composer and believe Stravinsky had much influence on Varese, though the later I'm sure doesn't like to read such ideas. I believe for me this is something great with Stravinsky, his new methods and ideas. I would suspect both Varese and Stravinsky had influences on another of my favs , Elliot carter. So we really owe more appreciation to Stravinsky other than his fine works.
I'll order the 2 Craft/Naxos this month.
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Post by karlhenning » Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:36 am

paulb wrote:btw I did not know Petrushka was a sym, I'll have to revisit that one.
I'm afraid I managed somehow to mislead you, Paul. Petrushka and the Symphony in Three Movements are two different works, written about 30 years apart. Petrushka is a ballet in four scenes.

Cheers,
~Karl
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Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:41 am

karlhenning wrote: I will take up my list of 15 great Stravinsky masterworks (plus L'oiseau de feu)
Orpheus
Craft, reissued on Naxos; absolutely superb.
I'm still waiting for the Stravinsky/CSO recording to be re-issued by Sony. it ws on a complete set awhile ago...

The Symphonies of Wind Instruments
Boulez on DG
I have Boulez/NYPO on Sony, which is good, but my favorite, TMK has never made it to CD - Fennell/EWE on Mercury LP. great recording..
The Symphony in C
I'm still digging into this one,
Solti/CSO is superb, far better than Stravinsky's own. wonderfully rhythmic, spikey and animated. the slow mvt has a delicious flowing,spontaneous quality - great playing by flute, oboe, Cl [ ?? Peck, Klein, Combs] who manage to toss off all the rhythmic intricacies effortlessly, as embellishments......

Le sacre du printemps
Any number of excellent recordings, even by my lights (I tend to shy away from romanto-behemoth readings of this 'un)
give me animal violence, and walloping impact for this masterpiece!! :lol:

Bernstein/NYPO/1958
Solti/CSO
Boulez/Cleveland...
Agon
I've not heard Craft - but Irving/NYC Ballet Orchestra is very good...
Le baiser de la fée
Not nearly enough good recordings of this ballet (complete), either.
I don't have this complete - for the Suite - Reiner/CSO - fabulous, one of their best...wonderfully lyrical, but still with plenty of rhythmic punch. there is some truly remarkable orchestral work on this performance. [Horn I -Farkas - Bravissimo!!]
The Octet
one of my favorite pieces - by far the best I've heard is Stravinsky, Columbia Chamber Ens [NY guys] from 1961. issued as part of Sony Stravinsky Edition Vol VII. I got mine from a broken up complete set I found at the old boston tower Records...definitely worth finiding. a marvelous performance..
L'oiseau de feu (complete)
I've got a Boulez recording, too, somewhere, but I haven't trotted it out yet.
Boulez/CSO on DG is terrific, highly recommended...for the suite,

Bernstein/NYPO from 1957
Giulini/CSO/EMI
Last edited by Heck148 on Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by jwinter » Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:46 pm

I recently acquired Esa-Pekka Salonnen's Stravinsky set on Sony France -- I don't have a lot to compare it with (other than Firebird & the Rite) but so far I've found them to be very enjoyable, cleanly articulated readings and well-recorded; he's very good at bringing out the subtleties of the scores and making all of the parts audible. Cool, but powerful -- worth a look if you see them at a good price... :)

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Post by paulb » Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:56 pm

Well I dug around in stacks of cds garaged away and did happen to come across one Stravinsky cd. Has Scenes de Ballet, Firebirdsuite, Rite 1913 version with Kegel/Rundfunk Leipzig/Weitbuck label. Good performances, a few slip ups in the barss sections, but overall very good.
I'm breaking down a few prejudices on stravinsky. Good works all 3. I happen to like the Firebird mainly because the symbol of the Phenoix rising from the fire is a old symbol of alchemy and is important for western man. The music is also good.
I've caceled my Craft/Naxos order. I'm going to look around.
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Post by MaestroDJS » Fri Oct 06, 2006 4:37 pm

karlhenning wrote:(Dave, I'm guessing that this should be Vol XI, instead?)
Good gravy, I can't slip anything past you! This reminds me of the archeologists who discovered forerunners of the band Spinal Tap amongst ancient Roman ruins. They had a crude amplifier that went all the way up to XI. :)
karlhenning wrote:. . . which begs the question, how often was it the case that his limitations as a conductor failed to result in a performance which matched "how his music should sound"?
Which also begs the question how often is it the case that technically capable conductors have failed to understand certain music. Given my druthers, and the fact that he knew more about this music than I ever will, I'll err on the side of Stravinky's possibly imperfect but never less than fascinating performances.

Dave

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Post by hautbois » Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:16 pm

jwinter wrote:I recently acquired Esa-Pekka Salonnen's Stravinsky set on Sony France -- I don't have a lot to compare it with (other than Firebird & the Rite) but so far I've found them to be very enjoyable, cleanly articulated readings and well-recorded; he's very good at bringing out the subtleties of the scores and making all of the parts audible. Cool, but powerful -- worth a look if you see them at a good price... :)
Very very clean interpretation, and the Philharmonia is at it's peak in La Sacre. Say, what are the major differences between the 2 available versions of the Firebird suite? I enjoy Boulez's performance on DVD with the CSO a lot!

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Post by anasazi » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:51 am

Leonard Bernstein's classic recording of PETRUSHKA with the NYPO has been given the royal treatment on a new CD by Sony.
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Oct 07, 2006 2:42 am

A Stravinsky disc I spin more than any another, also the earlier of his two recs of Rake's Progress, once heard live at CIM, I have loved it:

<div align="center">Image</div>
  • Le baiser de la fée (The Fairy’s Kiss), ballet in 4 scenes for orchestra
    Composed by Igor Stravinsky
    Performed by Cleveland Orchestra
    Conducted by Igor Stravinsky

  • Symphony in C, for orchestra in C major
    Composed by Igor Stravinsky
    Performed by Cleveland Orchestra
    Conducted by Igor Stravinsky

  • Pulcinella, ballet with song in 1 act, for 3 vocal soloists & orchestra
    Composed by Igor Stravinsky
    Performed by Cleveland Orchestra
    with Mary Simmons
    Conducted by Igor Stravinsky

  • L'histoire du soldat (The Soldier's Tale), concert suite for 7 instruments
    Composed by Igor Stravinsky
    with Robert Nagel, Alexander Schneider, Julius Levine, Loren Glickman, David Oppenheim
    Conducted by Igor Stravinsky

  • Octet for wind instruments
    Composed by Igor Stravinsky
    with Robert Nagel, Loren Glickman, Julius Baker, David Oppenheim
    Conducted by Igor Stravinsky
    [/color][/size]
---------------------------
I also like Ansermet in Stravinsky.

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Post by val » Sat Oct 07, 2006 3:03 am

My favorite recordings of some Stravinsky works:

Petrushka / The Rite of Spring / Oedipus Rex / Noces / Missa / Cantata, by Karel Ancerl with the Czech Philarmonic

The Firebird (suite) by Boulez with the BBC Orchestra and the complete ballet by Dorati with the LSO

Le chant du Rossignol, by Dorati with the LSO

L'Histoire du Soldat, Symphony of Psalms by Markevitch

Symphony in three movements by Stravinsky

The Violin Concerto by Perlman and Ozawa

Pulcinella, suite by Boulez with the NYPO

Renard by Charles Dutoit

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Post by david johnson » Sat Oct 07, 2006 4:08 am

when i was building my stravinsky lp collection, i mostly went with stravinsky/columbia symphony or ansermet/osr recordings.

there is a giant dropoff in my enjoyment of his music once it hits the 50s.

dj

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 7:33 am

karlhenning wrote:Two addenda:

(1) Sorry I didn't make it clear, but this thread is a general invitation to name your beloved Stravinsky recordings in a humanitarian effort to assure Paul that Igor Fyodorovich has not in fact gone begging for excellent recordings.

(2) I can't believe that I listed 15 beloved Stravinsky works and omitted the Symphony of Psalms . . . but that just goes to show the strength of the Stravinsky catalogue, doesn't it?

Cheers,
~Karl
Yes, but Karl, you never got back to me on a recording of Le Rossignol that does not have a shrill, shreiking Russian soprano. :)

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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by C.B. » Sat Oct 07, 2006 8:43 am

Heck148 wrote:...give me animal violence, and walloping impact for this masterpiece!! :lol:

Bernstein/NYPO/1958
Solti/CSO
Boulez/Cleveland...
If that's the case, then the two following recorded performances should be on your list:

Ozawa, Chicago Symphony on RCA--recorded 1968
Dorati, Detroit Symphony on London/Decca--recorded 1981

Dorati has everybody beat in the "animal violence" category, and if you think that the DSO is not up to Le Sacre (sorta the way people thought the Detroit Tigers wouldn't be able to stand up to the Yankees), then think again--they play "balls out" on this piece as well as anybody.

The Ozawa is great, too--but the Dorati/DSO performance is the one I come back to most often. It's got everything--balance, structure, nuance--and violence.
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Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:19 am

jserraglio wrote:A Stravinsky disc I spin more than any another,[*]L'histoire du soldat (The Soldier's Tale), concert suite for 7 instruments
Composed by Igor Stravinsky
with Robert Nagel, Alexander Schneider, Julius Levine, Loren Glickman, David Oppenheim
Conducted by Igor Stravinsky
I'd like to track this one down. IS' later, 1961 version with West Coast players is quite good - this ine listed has an outstanding lineup

[*]Octet for wind instruments
Composed by Igor Stravinsky
with Robert Nagel, Loren Glickman, Julius Baker, David Oppenheim[/quote]

This player list sound very much like the recording IS made in 1961, for Columbia. [Flautist may ve different...]
does your disc provide the recording dates??

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Post by jserraglio » Sat Oct 07, 2006 11:02 am

CD issue - Columbia Masterworks Heritage MH2K 63325
... includes a 3 min rehearsal frag (1952) of Symphony in C, prev. unreleased.

Soldat and Wind Octet were issued on Columbia LP ML 4964 (1955?)
rec. 30th St Studio NYC 1/26-27/1954

I have Col ML 4964 which also contains Symphonies of Wind Instruments, not on the CD, as well as LPs containing The Fairy's Kiss and Sym in C. I have never seen the Pulcinella LP tho I have a friend who has it.

Hope this gives you what you need.

Wind Octet
Julius Baker - Flute
David Oppenheim - Clarinet
Loren Glickman, Sylvia Beutscher - Bassoons
Robt Nagel, Ted Weis - Trumpets
Erwin L. Price, Richard Hixson - Trombones

Soldat
David Oppenheim - Clarinet
Loren Glickman - Bassoon
Robt Nagel - Trumpet
Erwin L. Price - Trombone
Alfred Howard - Percussion
Alex Schneider - Violin
Julius Levine - Double-Bass

Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 12:19 pm

then the two following recorded performances should be on your list:

Ozawa, Chicago Symphony on RCA--recorded 1968
Dorati, Detroit Symphony on London/Decca--recorded 1981
Ozawa/CSO is good, I bought it when it first cameout in the 60s. the RCA sound is aliitle constricted, and Ozawa really has problems with this piece rhythmically. both CSO and BSO players have told me, on separate occasions of some of these.
Dorati has everybody beat in the "animal violence" category, and if you think that the DSO is not up to Le Sacre
DSO sounds good on this, but Le Sacre is really "prime time", and the world's best have all taken a shot at it. DSO is very good, but not quite up with the champs...I'll stick with the classic Bernstein/NYPO [it sort of set the tone for succeeding recordings], and Solti/CSO which in some ways does Bernstein even better..the closing sections of Part I feature some of the most amazing orchestral playing I've ever heard...

two [three really] Sacres that I forgot are the classic Stokowski/Philadelphia 1929-30 version. really a stunning achievement, in a work that was still regarded as extreme that time...
Zubin Mehta/LAPO on London, from the 60s. real sound spectacular, London puts you right in the middle of things, LA sounds terrific. Mehta is very good with this work - his NYPO recording is very fine also...

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Post by AntonioA » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:35 pm

Ansermet, Monteux and Stravinsky himself are obvous choices but i would like to mention two less famous recordings conducted by Andre Cluytens
in the fifties. Persephone and Le Rossignol , both sung in French .

Stokowskis prewar recordings of Sacre and Petrouchka are also favorites of mine.
AntonioA

Heck148
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Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 5:35 pm

jserraglio wrote:CD issue - Columbia Masterworks Heritage MH2K 63325

Wind Octet
Julius Baker - Flute
David Oppenheim - Clarinet
Loren Glickman, Sylvia Beutscher - Bassoons
Robt Nagel, Ted Weis - Trumpets
Erwin L. Price, Richard Hixson - Trombones

Soldat
David Oppenheim - Clarinet
Loren Glickman - Bassoon
Robt Nagel - Trumpet
Erwin L. Price - Trombone
Alfred Howard - Percussion
Alex Schneider - Violin
Julius Levine - Double-Bass
[/quote]
thanx - different performance, for sure. some of the same players as later, some different.

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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by pizza » Sat Oct 07, 2006 6:13 pm

Heck148 wrote:Ozawa/CSO is good, I bought it when it first cameout in the 60s. the RCA sound is aliitle constricted, and Ozawa really has problems with this piece rhythmically. both CSO and BSO players have told me, on separate occasions of some of these.
I have both the original LP and the more recent RCA remastered High Performance CD which has a wider dynamic range and sounds more natural. I suspect Martinon's influence in the performance.

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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by C.B. » Sat Oct 07, 2006 7:51 pm

Heck148 wrote:...and Solti/CSO which in some ways does Bernstein even better..the closing sections of Part I feature some of the most amazing orchestral playing I've ever heard...
Sorry, but I can't go along with you on this one. Le Sacre was not Solti's piece, and the orchestra knows it. The orchestral playing is poorly balanced (typical for a London/Decca recording of the period, the strings seem massively outnumbered), and the recording, made in Medinah Temple, is not particularly good, either--bloated, bass heavy, and even a little constricted.

The Ozawa recording shows the CSO in a MUCH better light, and as pizza pointed out, the remastered RCA "High Performance" CD sounds mightly fine--a significant improvement over the original vinyl.

Still, I think Dorati nails the ferocity of the piece better than anybody else, and the (sometimes) scrappy, edge-of-your-seat playing of the DSO actually add to the overall concept.
Musica magnorum est solamen dulce laborum

Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:01 pm

pizza wrote:
Heck148 wrote:Ozawa/CSO is good, I bought it when it first cameout in the 60s.
I have both the original LP and the more recent RCA remastered High Performance CD which has a wider dynamic range and sounds more natural. I suspect Martinon's influence in the performance.
Hmm.....interesting. maybe I'll check it out,

yes, Martinon's influence is very much in evidence. according to a former CSO player, the orchestra learned the piece very well under Martinon prior to Ozawa's recording...

in some places the orchestra just carried him thru...

Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:12 pm

C.B. wrote:
Heck148 wrote:...and Solti/CSO which in some ways does Bernstein even better..the closing sections of Part I feature some of the most amazing orchestral playing I've ever heard...
Sorry, but I can't go along with you on this one. Le Sacre was not Solti's piece, and the orchestra knows it.
No, they don't, they wail on it...
The orchestral playing is poorly balanced (typical for a London/Decca recording of the period, the strings seem massively outnumbered),
I disagree completely - the balances are generally excellent, and the clarity is quite remarkable. of course it helps to have players who are really nailing the parts...
and the recording, made in Medinah Temple, is not particularly good, either--bloated, bass heavy, and even a little constricted.
I have no idea what sort of stereo set-up you are using, but I do not hear any of the constriction or tubbiness you mention..there is plenty of treble, plenty of hard-edged wallop, and far greater presence than the Ozawa RCA [on LP]. I've not heard the Ozawa CD, but it has a long way to go to even get close to the Solti/Decca.
I think Dorati nails the ferocity of the piece
it's a very good performance. it's just that the competition in this piece is ferocious, so I go with the best available....Benstein's has some scruffy places, and a couple goofs were edited out on CD, but the overall performance is marvelous. still, tho - the concluding sections of Part I on Solti are really a stunning achievement. unbelievable orchestral execution and balance..

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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 08, 2006 5:42 am

Heck148 wrote: thanx - different performance, for sure. some of the same players as later, some different.
Just listened to these two works again and was mightily impressed.
Heck148 wrote:yes, Martinon's influence is very much in evidence. according to a former CSO player, the orchestra learned the piece very well under Martinon prior to Ozawa's recording...
I heard a great orch for the first time when Martinon conducted it on tour with the CSO before the Ozawa recording was made. Ive never been the same since--huge impact on a very impressionable listener. Does any kind of Martinon recording of this work exist?

On the Stravinsky front, on a 1981 Wergo LP (again in 1995 on a Orfeo CD), Emile Naoumoff plays The Firebird Suite for Piano (reduction by Naoumoff) that's quite stunning.

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Post by DavidRoss » Sun Oct 08, 2006 8:28 am

Though I like the clarity and color of Abbado's LSO Rite along with the other ballets on that fine recording, I must agree with Heck about the Solti/Chicago recording. I have it on a treasured LP and it sizzles with intensity and animal ferocity.

Other Stravinsky recordings I enjoy which have not yet been mentioned are the Orpheus Chamber Orchestras collection of miniatures on the disc titled Shadow Dances, Boulez/Ensemble Intercontemporain's Dumbarton Oaks, Ebony Concerto, & Eight Miniatures, and Gardiner's The Rake's Progress.
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Heck148
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Post by Heck148 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 9:57 am

jserraglio wrote: I heard a great orch for the first time when Martinon conducted it on tour with the CSO before the Ozawa recording was made. Ive never been the same since--huge impact on a very impressionable listener. Does any kind of Martinon recording of this work exist?
I don't know, there may be one lurking in the CSO archives somewhere..Don Tait, who posts at rmcr, might know...

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:49 pm

jserraglio wrote: I heard a great orch for the first time when Martinon conducted it on tour with the CSO before the Ozawa recording was made. Ive never been the same since--huge impact on a very impressionable listener. Does any kind of Martinon recording of this work exist?
Yes, the performance of September 28, 1967 was recorded and broadcast on January 28, 1968. It was rebroadcast several times during the 1974-76 years when broadcasts from the archives were offered as additional Marathon premiums. Besides the Martinon, two performances conducted by Lukas Foss were also recorded. These were from the Ravinia Festivals of 1966 and 1967.

John

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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 08, 2006 1:00 pm

CharmNewton wrote:
jserraglio wrote: I heard a great orch for the first time when Martinon conducted it on tour with the CSO before the Ozawa recording was made. Ive never been the same since--huge impact on a very impressionable listener. Does any kind of Martinon recording of this work exist?
Yes, the performance of September 28, 1967 was recorded and broadcast on January 28, 1968. It was rebroadcast several times during the 1974-76 years when broadcasts from the archives were offered as additional Marathon premiums. Besides the Martinon, two performances conducted by Lukas Foss were also recorded. These were from the Ravinia Festivals of 1966 and 1967.

John
Thanks for responding.

Maybe someday I'll find a copy of that broadcast--the 9/67 perf had to have been just a few weeks of the perf I heard in Hill Auditorium. Martinon acted so cool and restrained but the ferocity of the sound that poured outta that orchestra this Cleveland kid was totally unprepared for.

The comments from Amazon's reviewers of the Ozawa disk I immediately recognized as the essence of the Chicago perf I heard:
The best Rite of Spring, March 27, 2004 Reviewer: Peter Cooper (Houston, TX)

Ozawa's account of Stravinsky's most famous ballet is nothing short of astounding. The conductor has the Chicago Symphony playing with total attention. What is so amazing about this recording is that the orchestra is completely controlled and balanced. Although one may prefer a more spontaneous sounding Rite, one would be hard pressed to find a recording with more energy, polish, and power.
APOCALYPSE! June 4, 2002 Reviewer: A. Tohline (Rolla, MO)

When I first heard this recording, I almost wet myself. Be warned--this is not music to go to sleep to. In this recording, Seiji Ozawa captures the essence of Stravinsky's apocalyptic chef d'oeuvre and beats its furious, passionate, maniacal rhythm into the listener's head until you feel like the girl dancing herself to death in this ancient pagan rite. It's scary, but it's the best I've heard.

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Oct 08, 2006 1:23 pm

jserraglio wrote:
CharmNewton wrote:
jserraglio wrote: I heard a great orch for the first time when Martinon conducted it on tour with the CSO before the Ozawa recording was made. Ive never been the same since--huge impact on a very impressionable listener. Does any kind of Martinon recording of this work exist?
Yes, the performance of September 28, 1967 was recorded and broadcast on January 28, 1968. It was rebroadcast several times during the 1974-76 years when broadcasts from the archives were offered as additional Marathon premiums. Besides the Martinon, two performances conducted by Lukas Foss were also recorded. These were from the Ravinia Festivals of 1966 and 1967.

John
Thanks for responding.

Maybe someday I'll find a copy of that broadcast--the 9/67 perf had to have been just a few weeks of the perf I heard in Hill Auditorium. Martinon acted so cool and restrained but the ferocity of the sound that poured outta that orchestra this Cleveland kid was totally unprepared for.

The comments from Amazon's reviewers of the Ozawa disk I immediately recognized as the essence of the Chicago perf I heard:
The best Rite of Spring, March 27, 2004 Reviewer: Peter Cooper (Houston, TX)

Ozawa's account of Stravinsky's most famous ballet is nothing short of astounding. The conductor has the Chicago Symphony playing with total attention. What is so amazing about this recording is that the orchestra is completely controlled and balanced. Although one may prefer a more spontaneous sounding Rite, one would be hard pressed to find a recording with more energy, polish, and power.
APOCALYPSE! June 4, 2002 Reviewer: A. Tohline (Rolla, MO)

When I first heard this recording, I almost wet myself. Be warned--this is not music to go to sleep to. In this recording, Seiji Ozawa captures the essence of Stravinsky's apocalyptic chef d'oeuvre and beats its furious, passionate, maniacal rhythm into the listener's head until you feel like the girl dancing herself to death in this ancient pagan rite. It's scary, but it's the best I've heard.
You might post on rec.classical.music.recordings. Someone there may have a copy.

BTW, I've heard just about all of the Martinon broadcasts thanks to those Marathons. From Bach to Henze, Martinon was a great conductor. Like Monteux, he could conduct just about anything and make it sound special.

I have the Ozawa on reel-to-reel tape. Unfortunately, the machine is broken with little hope of repair.

John

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Post by pizza » Sun Oct 08, 2006 3:29 pm

One of the greatest of Stravinsky recordings was the 1949 Petrouchka, Ansermet/L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, London LLP 130. It was my first introduction to Stravinsky, and the acoustics of that old monaural recording was simply light years beyond anything I had ever heard before. The performance still stands up well when compared with performances I've heard since, including his stereo remake.

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:21 pm

pizza wrote:One of the greatest of Stravinsky recordings was the 1949 Petrouchka, Ansermet/L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, London LLP 130. It was my first introduction to Stravinsky, and the acoustics of that old monaural recording was simply light years beyond anything I had ever heard before. The performance still stands up well when compared with performances I've heard since, including his stereo remake.
Given the breadth of Ansermet's recorded repertoire, it wouldn't surprise me to see Decca devote one or two collections in their Original Masters series to his work, perhaps mixing mono and stereo recordings. I didn't pay a lot of attention to him in my early days of collecting, but I've come to admire him. He certainly has been a forgotten stalwart of the Decca/London stable. I've heard some of the early London FFRRs and they had great presence, much like well recorded 78s.

John

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Post by jserraglio » Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:36 am

I have a boxed CD set of Ansermet's stereo Stravinsky from London/Decca.
Did Dutton not release the mono Petroucka?--I know they issued an Ansermet plays Stravinsky disk.
Any Ansermet LP I see, I buy--just last week purchd the complete Brahms Sym set, the Fantastique with bonus rehearsal disk, Bach Suites 2 & 3, and a Debussy album--all were mint cond & perf, all in the stereo CS series...total cost 4 dollars.

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Post by CharmNewton » Mon Oct 09, 2006 12:19 pm

jserraglio wrote:I have a boxed CD set of Ansermet's stereo Stravinsky from London/Decca.
Did Dutton not release the mono Petroucka?--I know they issued an Ansermet plays Stravinsky disk.
Any Ansermet LP I see, I buy--just last week purchd the complete Brahms Sym set, the Fantastique with bonus rehearsal disk, Bach Suites 2 & 3, and a Debussy album--all were mint cond & perf, all in the stereo CS series...total cost 4 dollars.
Yes Dutton did issue a Petrushka, Firebirs Suite and Fairy's Kiss. The orchestra is listed as the LPO. The disc is now OP.

Congrats on your nice Ansermet find. You'll have to let us know how you like his Brahms--I've come to appreciate a more straightforward approach to his music and I expect Ansermet to be of that school.

John

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Post by jserraglio » Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:57 am

CharmNewton wrote:. . . let us know how you like his (Ansermet's) Brahms--I've come to appreciate a more straightforward approach to his music and I expect Ansermet to be of that school.
John
Ansermet's Brahms set (Lon CSA 2402) now occupies a special place alongside Walter's and Szell's as my preferred reading. Ansermet's is much more like Walter's--radiating warmth and cultivation, every phrase emerging naturally, powerful but not overpowering, elegant and refined--the very best qualities of the European tradition. The Decca soundstage simply glows--this orchestra may not be the VPO but it sure sounds awfully good to me--honestly musical--not calling attention to itself, more 'live' sounding than studio, Ansermet's affection for Brahms apparent at every turn.

Another great Ansermet disk I just heard is his Bizet CS 6208 (Sym in C, La Jolie Fille de Perth Ste, Jeux d'Enfants). I prefer the Sym to all others but Beecham's, and London's sound is much better than EMI's.

I can hardly wait to hear three others I picked up in the Ansermet cache: Albeniz-Iberia and Turina-Danzas Fant, CS 6194--Mussorg-Ravel Pictures and Liszt The Huns, CS 6177--the Symp Fantastique twofer with full rehearsal disk, CSA 2101.

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Post by Lance » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:50 pm

david johnson wrote:when i was building my stravinsky lp collection, i mostly went with stravinsky/columbia symphony or ansermet/osr recordings.

there is a giant dropoff in my enjoyment of his music once it hits the 50s.

dj
I have the 22-CD Stravinsky set issued by Sony that probably everyone should have who is a Stravinsky fan or fanatic. Most composers didn't conduct or perform their music as well as top-flight conductors or performing artists. (The one notable exception is the great Leroy Anderson!) I also have that RCA CD recorded in Moscow in 1962.

I tend to take the road that David Johnson mentioned about not enjoying as much of his music once the 1950s came about.

I happen to enjoy very much Stravinsky's own Columbia/Sony recording of his early Symphony in E-flat, Op. 1. It would be obvious that his compositional style would change drastically as time moved. Antal Dorati also made a superb recording of this work for Decca-London [414.456].

Beyond that, these are some of my favs:
  • Les Noces, DGG 423.251 w/Argerich, Katasaris, etc., Bernstein, conducting.
  • Rite of Spring, DGG 477.5485 w/Fricsay, conducting; RCA 6529 with Monteux/Boston SO.
  • Song of the Nightingale, RCA 5733 or 68168 with Reiner/Chicago SO.
  • The Fairy's Kiss, RCA 5833 wReiner/Chicago SO.
  • Petrouchka, RCA 6529 or 63303 w/Monteux/Boston SO; RCA 61394, Stokowski/Philadelphia Orchestra (r.1937); Testament 1139, Stokowski/His SO; DGG 477.5485, Fricsay/RIAS SO-Berlin
Actually, this list could go on and on. But in the end, for me certain conductors of Stravinsky's orchestral works always seemed to bring this music to its greatest life and include such notables as Monteux, Ansermet, Stokowski, Reiner, Markevitch, Bernstein, Fricsay, Leinsdorf, Cantelli, Rodzinski, just to name a few from the older set and some from the new.

While I am not a great fan of Stravinsky's music other than his so-called warhorses, he's a composer that fascinates me and I think life is much richer for music with his presence in the twentieth century.
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Post by Joe Barron » Sat Oct 14, 2006 1:58 pm

I just purchased a recording of The Soldier's Tale with the Prague Chamber Harmony conducted by Libor Pesek, on the Supraphon Label. I got it because it was cheap, but it's very fine for a non-name group with a non-name recording. Excellent sound quality, and the group makessome interesting choices. For example, the drummer ends the piece quietly instead of with a bang, and some of the tempos are a little slower than you might be used to. But overall, a very pleasing performance. (of course, it's one my favorite pieces.) The disk also includes the Octet, the Ragtime for 11 Instruments, and the all-too-seldom heard Ebony Concerto.

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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 15, 2006 5:27 am

Joe Barron wrote:I just purchased a recording of The Soldier's Tale with the Prague Chamber Harmony conducted by Libor Pesek, on the Supraphon Label. I got it because it was cheap, but it's very fine for a non-name group with a non-name recording. Excellent sound quality, and the group makessome interesting choices. For example, the drummer ends the piece quietly instead of with a bang, and some of the tempos are a little slower than you might be used to. But overall, a very pleasing performance. (of course, it's one my favorite pieces.) The disk also includes the Octet, the Ragtime for 11 Instruments, and the all-too-seldom heard Ebony Concerto.
You'll probably be pleased to learn that Libor Pesek is a fine conductor with name recognition among many listeners--that Supraphon recordings are usually outstanding and often preferable to the now defunct major labels. A couple great conductors--Vaclav Talich and Karl Ancerl--recorded for Supraphon.

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Oct 15, 2006 1:12 pm

jserraglio wrote:
CharmNewton wrote:. . . let us know how you like his (Ansermet's) Brahms--I've come to appreciate a more straightforward approach to his music and I expect Ansermet to be of that school.
John
Ansermet's Brahms set (Lon CSA 2402) now occupies a special place alongside Walter's and Szell's as my preferred reading. Ansermet's is much more like Walter's--radiating warmth and cultivation, every phrase emerging naturally, powerful but not overpowering, elegant and refined--the very best qualities of the European tradition. The Decca soundstage simply glows--this orchestra may not be the VPO but it sure sounds awfully good to me--honestly musical--not calling attention to itself, more 'live' sounding than studio, Ansermet's affection for Brahms apparent at every turn.

Another great Ansermet disk I just heard is his Bizet CS 6208 (Sym in C, La Jolie Fille de Perth Ste, Jeux d'Enfants). I prefer the Sym to all others but Beecham's, and London's sound is much better than EMI's.

I can hardly wait to hear three others I picked up in the Ansermet cache: Albeniz-Iberia and Turina-Danzas Fant, CS 6194--Mussorg-Ravel Pictures and Liszt The Huns, CS 6177--the Symp Fantastique twofer with full rehearsal disk, CSA 2101.
On paper I wouldn't have expected this to be Ansermet's approach to Brahms, but you've whetted my appetite. Today being a typical cold, rainy October day in Portland, I'll probably check out some second hand vinyl.

I believe the Berlioz disc was Ansermet's last recording. I hope that recording's final movement isn't symbolic of his record company's attitude to his recorded legacy :)

If you don't have Ansermet's Beethoven symphony cycle, give it a try. It should be easier to find than the Brahms. Very fresh and unforced and I enjoy it in much the same way that I enjoy Cluytens.

John

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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 15, 2006 2:44 pm

CharmNewton wrote:On paper I wouldn't have expected this to be Ansermet's approach to Brahms, but you've whetted my appetite. Today being a typical cold, rainy October day in Portland, I'll probably check out some second hand vinyl.

I believe the Berlioz disc was Ansermet's last recording. I hope that recording's final movement isn't symbolic of his record company's attitude to his recorded legacy :)

If you don't have Ansermet's Beethoven symphony cycle, give it a try. It should be easier to find than the Brahms. Very fresh and unforced and I enjoy it in much the same way that I enjoy Cluytens.

John
Well, I only listened to the Brahms cycle once but it did seem to me that, in contrast to his Beethoven cycle, which I havent listened to in some time but recall as objective in a good sense, Ansermet was caressing Brahms' music--not distorting it though nor engaging in emotional histrionics. Anyway, I found the performances to be clear & restrained, at the same time richly expressive. From these perfs, I would have guessed that Brahms was a French composer. I dunno who the engineers were but the sound was luscious, and that counts for a lot in Brahms.

I read somewhere that his last recording was with the New Philharmonia, Stravinsky's Firebird Ste, but Ive never heard it. I think London//Decca released a posthumous disk with a black cover--was that the Magnard 3rd?

I remember seeing a TV interview where a famous performer (I forget who but it may have been an opera singer) was asked about her favorite conductors. She immediately said Ansermet and refused to name any others.

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:42 pm

jserraglio wrote:
CharmNewton wrote:On paper I wouldn't have expected this to be Ansermet's approach to Brahms, but you've whetted my appetite. Today being a typical cold, rainy October day in Portland, I'll probably check out some second hand vinyl.

I believe the Berlioz disc was Ansermet's last recording. I hope that recording's final movement isn't symbolic of his record company's attitude to his recorded legacy :)

If you don't have Ansermet's Beethoven symphony cycle, give it a try. It should be easier to find than the Brahms. Very fresh and unforced and I enjoy it in much the same way that I enjoy Cluytens.

John
Well, I only listened to the Brahms cycle once but it did seem to me that, in contrast to his Beethoven cycle, which I havent listened to in some time but recall as objective in a good sense, Ansermet was caressing Brahms' music--not distorting it though nor engaging in emotional histrionics. Anyway, I found the performances to be clear & restrained, at the same time richly expressive. From these perfs, I would have guessed that Brahms was a French composer. I dunno who the engineers were but the sound was luscious, and that counts for a lot in Brahms.

I read somewhere that his last recording was with the New Philharmonia, Stravinsky's Firebird Ste, but Ive never heard it. I think London//Decca released a posthumous disk with a black cover--was that the Magnard 3rd?

I remember seeing a TV interview where a famous performer (I forget who but it may have been an opera singer) was asked about her favorite conductors. She immediately said Ansermet and refused to name any others.
It was his Beethoven (and his background in mathematics) that led me to believe his Brahms would be direct. I'm really intrigued. I'm going through a Brahms period right now, especially his chamber music. But I've also been giving thoughts to the symphonies as well, and Lord knows, I already have too many of those. :)

Ansermet didn't make many vocal recordings (he did record Debussy's Pelleas and Melisande) and the soprano Suzanne Danco appeared in a few of them. Perhaps she is the singer.

John

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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by moldyoldie » Wed Oct 18, 2006 3:36 pm

C.B. wrote:
Heck148 wrote:...give me animal violence, and walloping impact for this masterpiece!! :lol:
If that's the case, then the two following recorded performances should be on your list:

Ozawa, Chicago Symphony on RCA--recorded 1968
Dorati, Detroit Symphony on London/Decca--recorded 1981

Dorati has everybody beat in the "animal violence" category, and if you think that the DSO is not up to Le Sacre (sorta the way people thought the Detroit Tigers wouldn't be able to stand up to the Yankees), then think again--they play "balls out" on this piece as well as anybody.

The Ozawa is great, too--but the Dorati/DSO performance is the one I come back to most often. It's got everything--balance, structure, nuance--and violence.
Though a certain provincialism may be in evidence with my fellow Michigander, I must concur that the Antal Dorati/Detroit Symphony performance of Le Sacre du Printemps on London is about as "balls out" as they come! The recording is such that the listener is right on stage; crank up the volume and one's woofers will likely be loosened from their fixtures! :D

I first purchased the early digital recording on LP in about 1980 and it immediately became the sonic touchstone for my system. Sometime in the '90s, it was re-released on a London budget CD paired with Dorati/DSO's Petrushka, a fine performance that suffered somewhat from a rather strident recording. Unfortunately, I doubt if the recording is still available at retail.

Other favorite Stravinsky recordings are:
Petrushka
-Leonard Bernstein/New York Philharmonic on a Columbia double-LP from the '60s (paired with The Firebird Suite) which I believe was previously mentioned by others.
-Ernst Ansermet/L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande from 1963(?) on a London Treasury budget LP re-released in the early '70s, also previously mentioned. I've yet to find this on CD.

Les Noces; Pribaoutki; Berceuses du Chat; Four Russian Songs; Four Russian Peasant Songs
-Pierre Boulez/Chorus & Soloists of the Orchestre du Theatre National de Opera, Paris on a Nonesuch budget LP from the '70s.

By the way, I'm a non-musician in my early 50s who has just discovered this message board and this is my initial post. :wink:

jserraglio
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by jserraglio » Wed Oct 18, 2006 6:38 pm

moldyoldie wrote:Other favorite Stravinsky recordings are:
Petrushka....
-Ernst Ansermet/L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande from 1963(?) on a London Treasury budget LP re-released in the early '70s, also previously mentioned. I've yet to find this on CD.
Welcome.
I picked up EA's perf used but mint in this 8 CD budget box set for about $25 at Half Price Books. Click on image to follow the Amazon link:
Image

Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Wed Oct 18, 2006 8:59 pm

moldyoldie wrote: Other favorite Stravinsky recordings are:
Petrushka
-Leonard Bernstein/New York Philharmonic on a Columbia double-LP from the '60s (paired with The Firebird Suite) which I believe was previously mentioned by others.
I generally love Bernstein's performances of Stravinsky - the 1957 "Firebird" is wonderful, and so is the '58 "Le Sacre'. Lenny and his NYPO wild-men at their best
the Petrushka, tho, doesn't do it for me... it sounds like a run-thru, perhaps they were tired or whatever...

for Petrushka, I like Levine/CSO, and Mitropoulos/NYPO [I've not seen a cd of this wonderful version] - Mitropoulos takes a few eccentric tempos, but they work, and the playing is deliciously flamboyant and sardonic, with appropriately honky, quacky 2ble reeds featured prominently...

it's too bad - nobody plays this way anymore - everyone is trying too damned hard to sound "regular, normal", "inoffensive"...
By the way, I'm a non-musician in my early 50s who has just discovered this message board and this is my initial post. :wink:
welcome Moldyoldy!! good to see you here... :)

moldyoldie
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by moldyoldie » Sat Oct 21, 2006 7:07 am

Heck148 wrote:welcome Moldyoldy!! good to see you here... :)
Thank you, Heck. :D I'm looking forward to more, and I'll also keep an eye out for that Mitropoulos recording.

And thank you, jserraglio, for the link. :wink:

Heck148
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Re: Great Stravinsky Recordings

Post by Heck148 » Sat Oct 21, 2006 10:01 pm

moldyoldie wrote: I'll also keep an eye out for that Mitropoulos recording.
Let me know if you see it!! I've neer seen it on cd. my copy is a tape one of the LP.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 22, 2006 4:56 am

Stravinsky - Petrouchka / Debussy - La Mer / Prokofiev - Sinfonia 1 - Dimitri Mitropoulos -
on Urania - 1 used & new available from $17.99
Image


Product Description
CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918). La Mer: I. De I"aube a midi sur la mer [08" 13"] II. Jeuxdevagues [06"02"] III. Dialogue du vent et de la mer [07" 57"]. Registrazione effettuata a New York il 27 Novembre 1950.
IGOR STRAVINSKY (1882-1971). Petrouchka: Burlesque en quatre tableaux [32"29"]. Registrazione effettuata a New York il 5 Marzo 1951.
SERGEJ PROKOFIEV (1891 -1953). Sinfonia n. 1 Op. 25 »Classica«: 5 I. Allegro con brio [03"54"] 6 II. Larghetto [04"07"] 7 III. Gavotte: Non troppo Allegro [01" 15"] 8 IV. Finale: Molto vivace [03"04"]. Registrazione effettuata a Minneapolis il W Gennaio 1940.
New York Philharmonic Orchestra - Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra (Prokofiiev] - DIMITRI MITROPOULOS.

moldyoldie
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Location: Motown, USA

Post by moldyoldie » Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:20 pm

There's also this...

Image

...apparently a digitally remastered LP-to-CD transfer made available by an outfit called Bearac.

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