Best Classical CDs of the last 10 years

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slofstra
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Best Classical CDs of the last 10 years

Post by slofstra » Fri Jul 13, 2007 2:29 pm

I'm starting this thread because I'd like to hear a little more on recent recording activity. CMG is a great resource for information on the recordings of the 40s, 50s and 60s, but sometimes newer activity is overlooked. There are probably good reasons for this. A huge burst of recording activity occurred when recording technology finally reached the level where it could fairly faithfully reproduce the live musical experience (that would be the 1950s in my view). The early bird gets the worm, and with every major orchestra of the time recording Brahms' First Symphony, it's difficult to come out with a topper. So naturally, there is a significant focus on that era.

I'm looking for a list of recent recordings (NOT re-issues) that are not merely good, but top-notch - 'rosette' quality. Say, 1995 and later, back to 1990 if you have to. I'll follow with my own list soon.

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Post by knotslip » Fri Jul 13, 2007 2:51 pm

I think this is a great idea. I am often confused about what recordings of certain pieces are good and which ones are not. I purchase music in four formats - CD, DVD/DTS, SACD or Vinyl. I would love to know about top quality recordings of different pieces in these formats. I find that CD's are the best value and the cheapest way to experience most the most music - SACD's/DSD's are more expensive but usually better sounding and LP's are hit or miss. I will admit though that a well done LP, to me, sounds better than any of the other medias I have heard.

Anyway...Good post and I look forward to seeing some good recent recordings that people will recommend.

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Post by Chalkperson » Fri Jul 13, 2007 4:19 pm

knotslip wrote:I think this is a great idea. I am often confused about what recordings of certain pieces are good and which ones are not. I purchase music in four formats - CD, DVD/DTS, SACD or Vinyl. I would love to know about top quality recordings of different pieces in these formats. I find that CD's are the best value and the cheapest way to experience most the most music - SACD's/DSD's are more expensive but usually better sounding and LP's are hit or miss. I will admit though that a well done LP, to me, sounds better than any of the other medias I have heard.

Anyway...Good post and I look forward to seeing some good recent recordings that people will recommend.
SACD Rules, OK... :wink:

absinthe
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Post by absinthe » Fri Jul 13, 2007 4:32 pm

The problem here is that it still resolves as personal taste. Technical finesse is one issue; "recorded performance" is another (as distinct from any performance because a recorded performance has to bear repeated listening).

You can have the highest fidelity media in the world but the listening can still be awful...at least one cause can be the engineers not understanding the music or what 'recorded performance' is about. Others are the repro equipment, the listening room...and the listener's ears.

;)

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Post by slofstra » Fri Jul 13, 2007 4:46 pm

absinthe wrote:The problem here is that it still resolves as personal taste.
Oh, this is very much meant to be an exploration of personal taste!

The last time I started a thread like this (top 20 composers) I was asked if I meant objectively or subjectively. Personally, I'm very skeptical of the idea of 'objectivity' when it comes to musical preference.

Even for those who do believe there are absolutes in musical taste, to come up with an objective list is fraught with pointless argumentation.

So, I just say, let Corlyss post recent recordings in early music, jbuck in the 3 Bs, and chalkperson in his usual eclectic and wide-ranging style (assuming these three feel inclined to honour us with their thoughts along this line), and lets be done with objectivity.

Thanks for bringing it up, absinthe.

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Post by some guy » Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:09 pm

jbuck in the 3 Bs
jbuck likes Berlioz? Sweet!
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Post by Chalkperson » Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:48 pm

slofstra wrote: So, I just say, let Corlyss post recent recordings in early music, jbuck in the 3 Bs, and chalkperson in his usual eclectic and wide-ranging style (assuming these three feel inclined to honour us with their thoughts along this line), and lets be done with objectivity.
Sure, give me a day or so...happy to oblige... :D

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Post by Chalkperson » Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:44 pm

some guy wrote:
jbuck in the 3 Bs
jbuck likes Berlioz? Sweet!
Boccherini and Bruckner too, or maybe John 'Bull'... :lol:

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Jul 14, 2007 11:19 am

I'll contribute the concerted efforts by numerous artists to revive and record Handel's entire operatic output. I believe a couple of years ago someone, perhaps RAD himself, stated that there were none left unrecorded at that point.

Do reissues count?
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slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:31 pm

Nope. No reissues.

I'd like to see if a consensus will emerge (assuming a sufficient number participate) on who the legends of this generation might be. So re-issues would confuse the issue.

This is proving to be a little harder than I thought. I quickly identified 20 or so suitably felicitous releases from my master list and I will have to winnow that down a little.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:31 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:Do reissues count?
I was thinking the same thing, last night I listened to Tatania Nicoleava's Shostakovich Preludes, it sounded incredible, especially considering how bad those Melodya Recordings were, so I say, yes, lets include re-issues if the sonics are truly improved beyond belief...still going to take me a day to come up with a list, but I intend to try and cover most all of the different kinds of music 1200-2007 and suggest maybe 50 discs, get your credit cards out folks... :wink:

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:34 pm

slofstra wrote:Nope. No reissues.

I'd like to see if a consensus will emerge (assuming a sufficient number participate) on who the legends of this generation might be. So re-issues would confuse the issue.

This is proving to be a little harder than I thought. I quickly identified 20 or so suitably felicitous releases from my master list and I will have to winnow that down a little.
I know this is your operation, but why not include reissues and open it up beyond 10? You will get more responses.
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slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:49 pm

Okay, let's do it this way - reissues under a separate heading.

New issues:
Title 1
Title 2

Reissues:
Title 1
Title 2

Or alternately put the word reissue in brackets behind the title name.

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Post by Haydnseek » Sat Jul 14, 2007 1:01 pm

The Mendelssohn string quartets as played by the Talich Quartet on the Calliope label: 2000-2003. They were revelatory interpretations for me that caused me to hear all of Mendelssohn's music differently ever since.
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Post by CharmNewton » Sat Jul 14, 2007 3:19 pm

Three recordings come immediately to mind for me.

J.S.Bach: Partita No. 2, Sonata No. 3 and Partita No. 3 for Solo Violin played by Hilary Hahn (Sony). Startlingly perfect intonation and great beauty of sound make these the most moving recordings of this music I have ever heard.

Elgar: Violin Concerto in B minor, Op. 61 played by Hilary Hahn and the London Symphony conducted by Colin Davis (DG). In my opinion, along with Heifetz and Kyoko Takezawa, this is the finest playing this concerto has seen on record. The beauty of Hahn's sound along with her intense concentration raise the recording to eloquence. In my opinion, this is the most emotional and difficult concerto in the standard repertoire and Hahn has made a very special recording of it.

Rachmaninoff: Concerto No 2 in C minor, Op. 18 performed by Krystian Zimerman and the Boston Symphony conducted by Seiji Ozawa (DG, coupled with Concerto No. 1). Zimerman's performance is both eloquent and moving with his customary attention to every note. It is amazing how much of the piano cuts through in this extraordinary recording which sonically is demonstration class.

John

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Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:35 pm

I hope you can read this list. I decided to use my computer discography program. Not a great idea.
This is the A list. For each recording I list the artist, then all the compositions on that CD.


A Orchestra Tafelmusik, Lamon, Jeanne Sony: S2K66289

Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major; bwv 1046
Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F major; bwv 1047
Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G major; bwv 1048
Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major; bwv 1049
Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major; bwv 1050
Bach, Johann Sebastian Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B-flat major; bwv 1051

BBC recently had a runoff of the various Brandenburg recordings. This got barely a mention, but none that they played could match it.

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A Chamber Ma, Yo-Yo Stern, Isaac; Laredo, Jaime Sony: SK-53339

Beethoven, Ludwig van Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello in E flat major; op 16
Schumann, Robert Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello in E flat major; op 47

The andante of the Schumann quartet is a highlight.
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A Keyboard Perahia, Murray "Aldeburgh Recital" Sony: SK-46437
Beethoven, Ludwig van Piano Variations in C minor (32); woo 80
Liszt, Franz Consolation no. 3 in D flat major
Liszt, Franz Hungarian Rhapsody no. 12
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Etude-tableau In A minor, Allegro; op 39 No. 6
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Etude-tableau In D major, Allegro moderato; op 39 No. 9
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Etude-tableau In E flat major, Appassionato; op 39 No. 5
Rachmaninoff, Sergei In C major, Allegro; op 33 No. 2
Schumann, Robert Carnival Jest from Vienna; op 26

My favourite Perahia recording.
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A Keyboard Pollini, Maurizio DG: 289-435-472-2

Beethoven, Ludwig van Piano Sonata No.11 in B-flat Major; op 22
Beethoven, Ludwig van Piano Sonata No.12 in A-flat Major; op 26
Beethoven, Ludwig van Piano Sonata No.21 in C Major "Waldstein"; op 53

I have many Beethoven sonata recordings. My favourite recording of them all. The "Waldstein" is magical.
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A Orchestra , Rattle, Simon (Vienna Philharmonic) EMI: 2435574452

Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 1 in C Major; op 21
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 2 in D Major; op 36
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major "Eroica"; op 55
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 4 in B-flat Major; op 60
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 5 in C minor; op 67
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 6 in F major "Pastorale"; op 68
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 7 in A major; op 92
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 8 in F major; op 93
Beethoven, Ludwig van Symphony No. 9 in D minor; op 125

Exciting. The piccolo goes nuts in the last movement of the Fifth; I hope he didn't swallow it.
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A Chamber Shifrin, David Chamber Music Northwest Delos: DE3066

Brahms, Johannes Quintet for Clarinet and Strings; op 115
Brahms, Johannes String Quintet No. 2 in G major; op 111

Sublime. A great piece of music; a great rendition. Most of the Brahms chamber music I have is pre-1990.
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A Keyboard Uchida, Mitsuko Philips: D115551

Debussy, Claude Etude for piano (12)

An amazing piece of modern music, and an amazing recording.
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A Concerto Kennedy, Nigel, Rattle, Simon (Birmingham Symphony Orchestra) EMI Classics: 5-56413-2

Elgar, Edward Violin Concerto in B minor; op 61
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Lark Ascending, The

Kennedy and Rattle both crackle with excitement. Chosen for the Elgar, of course; I have umpteen renditions of the Lark
as its invariably used to round out an Elgar or RVW CD.
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A Orchestra , Gergiev, Valery (Kirov Orchestra) Philips: D102342

Borodin, Alexander Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances
Borodin, Alexander Prince Igor: Polovtsian March
Glinka, Mikhail Overture "Russlan and Ludmilla"
Khatchaturian, Aram Gayaneh: Sabre Dance
Khatchaturian, Aram Spartacus: Adagio
Liadov, Anatole Baba-Yaga; op 56
Liadov, Anatole Kikimora; op 63
Tchaikovsky, Pyotr Ilyich Overture "1812"; op 49

Crisp, clean, watch you don't blow up your tweeter.
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A Keyboard Andsnes, Leif Ove "Lyric Pieces" EMI: 5-572296-2
Grieg, Edvard Arietta, Waltz, Folk Melody, Norwegian Melody; op 12 No. 1, 2, 5, 6
Grieg, Edvard At Your Feet. Evening in the Mountains. Cradle Song; op 68 No. 3, 4,
Grieg, Edvard Elegy, Waltz, Canon.; op 38 No. 6, 7, 8
Grieg, Edvard Gade, Illusion, Homesickness; op 57 No. 2, 3, 6
Grieg, Edvard March of the Trolls, Notturno.; op 54 No. 3, 4
Grieg, Edvard Melody; op 47 No. 3
Grieg, Edvard Summer Evening. Gone. Remembrances; op 71 No. 2, 6, 7
Grieg, Edvard Sylph. The Brook. Phantom. Homeward; op 62 No. 1, 4, 5, 6
Grieg, Edvard Wedding Day at Troldhaugen; op 65 No. 6

Fun. Melodic. A good initiation to classical keyboard music.
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A Choral McNair, Sylvia, Gardiner, John Eliot (English Baroque Soloists) Monteverdi Choir Philips: D153820
Handel, George Frideric Laudate pueri Dominum; hwv 237
Handel, George Frideric Silete venti; hwv 242
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Exsultate juibilate; k 165

McNair - my favourite Exsultate, such a nimble voice.
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A Choral Tafelmusik, Weil, Bruno Tolzer Children's Choir; van der Kamp, Harry; Hering, Jorg; Sony: SX2K57965
Haydn, Joseph Creation, Hob. XXI:2

"Die Welt, so gross, so wunderbar." This recording ist wunderbar.
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A Orchestra , Bernstein, Leonard (Israel Philharmonic Orchestra) DG: 429-404-2

Hindemith, Paul Concert Music; op 50
Hindemith, Paul Symphonic Metamorphoses on a Theme by Carl Maria von Weber
Hindemith, Paul Symphony "Mathis der Maler"

I heard the KW Symphony play this 15 years ago, and purchased this the next day. A favourite ever since.
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A Concerto Bell, Joshua, Norrington, Roger (Camerata Salzburg) Sony: SK89505

Beethoven, Ludwig van Violin Concerto in D major; op 61
Mendelssohn, Felix Violin Concerto in E Minor; op 64

Chosen for the Mendelssohn. The best thing he wrote.
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A Orchestra Tafelmusik, Weil, Bruno Sony: SK46696
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus German Dance (6); k 509
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus German Dance (6); k 571
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus German Dances /k 567 (6); k 536
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Twelve German Dances; k 586

Chosen for the k 567 !!!. Recorded in Kitchener, ON in the home of the KW Symphony.
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A Orchestra Vengerov, Maxim, Rostroprovich, Mstislav (London Symphony Orchestra) Teldec: D110851

Prokofiev, Sergei Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major; op 19
Shostakovich, Dmitri Violin Concerto No. 1 in A minor; op 77

Stunning virtuousity.
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A Keyboard Volodos, Arcadi "Rach 3" Sony: SK64384
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Etude-tableaux in C sharp minor; op 33 No. 6
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor; op 30
Rachmaninoff, Sergei posth. Prelude in D minor; op 0
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Prelude in F minor; op 32 No. 6
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Romance in F minor; op 10 No. 6
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Serenade in B flat minor; op 3 No. 5
Rachmaninoff, Sergei Sonata: Andante; op 19

It's difficult to pick the best Rach 3. One of the best. Nothing is slurred.
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A Orchestra Handley, Vernon (Royal Liverpool Orchestra) Shimell, William; Royal Liverpool EMI: 5757602

Vaughan Williams, Ralph English Folk Song Suite
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Fantasia on "Greensleeves"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Five Variants of Dive and Lazarus
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Flos campi
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Job - A Masque for Dancing
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Oboe Concerto in A minor
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Partita for double string orchestra
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Serenade to Music (choral version)
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 1 "A Sea Symphony"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 2 "A London Symphony"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 3 "A Pastoral Symphony"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 4 in F minor
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 5 in D major
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 6 in E minor
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 7 "Sinfonia Antarctica"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 8 in D minor
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Symphony No. 9 in E minor

I only have one set of RVW symphonies (lots of singles). I can't imagine there would be anything better than this.

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A Choral Corydon Singers, Best, Matthew Howarth, Judith; Ainsley, John Mark; Allen, Thomas Hyperion: CDA66655

Vaughan Williams, Ralph Dona Nobis pacem
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Four Hymns
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Lord, thou hast been our refuge "Psalm 90"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph O Clap Your Hands "Psalm 47"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph Toward the Unknown Region

Of four renditions of 'Dona Nobis pacem' I have, this is the best.
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And finally the B list


B Choral Bostridge, Ian, Biondi, Fabio (Europa Galante) Veritas: 24354-54202

Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No. 7: "Dies hat Gott klar"; bwv 7 3
Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No. 43 "Es will der hochste"; bwv 43 2
Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No. 55 "Ich armer Mensch, ich Sundenknecht"; bwv 55
Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No. 82: "Ich habe genug"; bwv 82 a.
Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No.139: "Gott ist mein Freund"; bwv 139 2
Bach, Johann Sebastian Cantata No.198: "Der ewigkeit saphirnes Haus"; bwv 198 8
Bach, Johann Sebastian Easter Oratorio: "Sanfte soll mein Todeskummer"; bwv 249 7
Bach, Johann Sebastian Sinfonia "Cantata No. 18"; bwv 18
Bach, Johann Sebastian Sinfonia "Cantata No. 4"; bwv 4 1
Bach, Johann Sebastian Sinfonia "Peasant Cantata"; bwv 212 1
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B Chamber Hahn, Hilary Sony: SK62793

Bach, Johann Sebastian Partita No. 2 in D minor for Solo Violin; bwv 1004
Bach, Johann Sebastian Partita No. 3 in E major; bwv 1006
Bach, Johann Sebastian Sonata No. 3 in C major; bwv 1005
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B Concerto Bell, Joshua, Zinman, David (Baltimore Symphony Orchestra) London: 452851-2

Barber, Samuel Violin Concerto; op 14
Bloch, Ernest Baal Shem
Walton, William Violin Concerto
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B Concerto Ax, Emanuel, Haitink, Bernard (Boston Symphony) Sony: SK63229

Brahms, Johannes Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major; op 83
Brahms, Johannes Violin Sonata No. 1 in G major; op 78

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B Keyboard Perahia, Murray Sony: SK61885

Chopin, Frederic Etude (12); op 25
Chopin, Frederic Etude (12); op 10
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B Opera Gheorghiu, Angela, Plasson, Michel (Toulouse Capital Orchestra) Alagna, Roberto; van dam, EMI: D223015
Gounod, Charles Romeo et Juliette

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B Concerto , Chailly, Riccardo (Amsterdam Concertgebouw) Decca: 473722-2

Hindemith, Paul Kammermusik No. 1, Kleine; op 24
Hindemith, Paul Kammermusik No. 2, 3, 4, 5; op 36
Hindemith, Paul Kammermusik No. 6, 7; op 46

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B Orchestra , Gardiner, John Eliot (Philharmonia Orchestra) Women's Voices of the Monteverdi Choir DG: G2-45860

Grainger, Percy The Warriors
Holst, Gustav The Planets; op 32
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B Concerto , Wit, Antoni (Polish National Radio Symphony) Naxos: 8.553625
Lutoslawski, Witold Cello Concerto
Lutoslawski, Witold Chain No. 3
Lutoslawski, Witold Livre pour Orchestre
Lutoslawski, Witold Novelette

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B Orchestra , Muti, Riccardo (Philadelphia Orchestra) Philips: D193885

Moussorgsky, Modest Night on the Bare Mountain
Moussorgsky, Modest Pictures at an Exhibition

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B Concerto Midori Imai, Nobuko Sony: SK89488
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Concerto in D major for Violin and Piano; k 56
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Sinfonia Concertante in E flat; k 364

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B Choral Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir Kaljuste, Tonu ECM: 1654/55

Part, Arvo Kanon Pokajanen
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B Choral Choir of Clare College Cambridge, Brown, Timothy (London Sinfonietta) Naxos: 8.557130
Rutter, John Advent Anthem
Rutter, John Anthem for double choir
Rutter, John Musica Dei Donum
Rutter, John Requiem
Rutter, John Two Blessings
Rutter, John Two Organ Pieces, Toccata and Variations
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B Keyboard Uchida, Mitsuko Philips: 456-245-2
Schubert, Franz Impromptu (4); D 899
Schubert, Franz Impromptu (4); D 935
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B Keyboard Perahia, Murray Sony: S2K-87706

Schubert, Franz Piano Sonata in A Major; D 959
Schubert, Franz Piano Sonata in C Minor; D 958
Schubert, Franz Piano Sonata No.21 in B-flat Major; D 960
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B Keyboard Perahia, Murray Sony: SK-62786

Schumann, Robert Kreisleriana; op 16
Schumann, Robert Piano Sonata in F sharp minor; op 11

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B* Orchestra Tafelmusik, Weil, Bruno Analekta: 2.9834

Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Symphony No. 40 in G minor; k 550
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Symphony No. 41 in C "Jupiter"; k 551
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B* Chamber Emerson String Quartet DG: 4757407
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 1 in C major; op 49
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 2 in A major; op 68
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 3 in F major; op 73
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 4 in D major; op 83
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 5 in B flat major; op 92
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 6 in G major; op 101
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 7 in F sharp minor; op 108
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 8 in C minor; op 110
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No. 9 in E flat major; op 117
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.10 in A flat major; op 118
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.11 in F minor; op 122
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.12 in D flat major; op 133
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.13 in B flat minor; op 138
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.14 in F sharp major; op 142
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet No.15 in E flat minor; op 144
Shostakovich, Dmitri String Quartet Pieces (2)

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Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 14, 2007 7:01 pm

I disagree with most of the above.

I have just a few recommendations off-hand--

1. The Barshai set of the Shostakovich symphonies on Brilliant.
2. The St Petersburg Quartet's set of the Shostakovich string quartets plus the Piano Quintet and the Piano Trio 2 on hyperion.
3. A Virgin Classics twofer that turns out to be from 1989, but I just discovered it last year, so as far as I'm concerned its from 2006. :wink: It is an R Strauss issue and consists of the violin sonata done by Dmitry Sitkovetsky, violin, and Pavel Gililov, piano, and three works involving the Academy of London conducted by one Richard Stamp. They are the Oboe Concerto with Ray Still as soloist, a fine performance of Metamorphosen, and 9 songs with orchestra with soprano Gundula Janowitz. OK, if you count each of the songs as a separate work, that's actaully 11 works for orchestra, a dozen works all together.
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Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 14, 2007 7:16 pm

I disagree with most of the above.
This seems like a non-sequitur. Umm, what's to disagree with?

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Post by hangos » Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:37 am

RebLem wrote:I disagree with most of the above.

I have just a few recommendations off-hand--

1. The Barshai set of the Shostakovich symphonies on Brilliant.
2. The St Petersburg Quartet's set of the Shostakovich string quartets plus the Piano Quintet and the Piano Trio 2 on hyperion.
I would definitely endorse the Barshai set - I have never heard a 4th Symphony performance to match it! I haven't heard the St.Petersburg - are they as good as the Shostakovich Quartet (reissued on Regis at superbargain price in the last few years, so does it count? :D )

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Post by CharmNewton » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:09 am

I'm surprised that more members aren't piping in with what they believe are truly great recordings made within the past 10 years.

I was just thinking of the recording of Vivaldi's Four Seasons with Fabio Biondi and Europa Galante on Virgin. While I still love Mullova/Abbado on Philips (recorded about 20 years ago) because her contribution is so stunning, the Biondi is so fresh and so vivacious and different that it re-defines the work. If it were used as elevator music, I could picture a lot of folks riding up and down for a half-hour or so just not wanting to get off. :)

John

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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Jul 15, 2007 9:01 am

The Tintner Bruckner cycle on Naxos began in 1995 and continued through 1998. All the discs are good and several sound truly outstanding to me.

Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998

Gardiner's version of Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress - 1999

Haitink made three discs of Ravel music with the Boston Symphony and two of them are from 1998 - wonderful

Haitink: Symphonies 8 and 9 by Vaughan Williams - 2000
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Post by knotslip » Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:33 am

Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998
I recently heard Claude Debussy's "Prelude a L'apres midi D'un faune" and I really loved it. Please excuse the spelling if it is not correct...I am very new to classical and have not learned French or Italian as of yet :-)

I was wondering if the 1998 recording you mention contains this work?

Thanks.

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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:34 am

knotslip wrote:
Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998
I recently heard Claude Debussy's "Prelude a L'apres midi D'un faune" and I really loved it. Please excuse the spelling if it is not correct...I am very new to classical and have not learned French or Italian as of yet :-)

I was wondering if the 1998 recording you mention contains this work?

Thanks.
No, they are all pieces for piano solo but they include the famous "La fille aux cheveux de lin."
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Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:08 pm

Haydnseek wrote:
knotslip wrote:
Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998
I recently heard Claude Debussy's "Prelude a L'apres midi D'un faune" and I really loved it. Please excuse the spelling if it is not correct...I am very new to classical and have not learned French or Italian as of yet :-)

I was wondering if the 1998 recording you mention contains this work?

Thanks.
No, they are all pieces for piano solo but they include the famous "La fille aux cheveux de lin."
Have you heard Uchida's version. I wonder how you think it compares. Uchida's is on my list, although I've not heard Kocsis'.

knotslip,
A lot of us haven't learned French or Italian yet either. :) There are many fine recordings of L'apres midi and as it's a short piece, I would look for a coupling with La Mer, which you're sure to also enjoy. I see a nice budget recording ($11) on Amazon with Charles Munch. I have a feeling it would be good, based on his track record with French composers. Someone here may know for sure.

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Post by knotslip » Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:35 pm

Thank you very much Slofstra. I will definitely check out that CD.

One problem I have as a newb is not knowing if a piece I hear and like is a popular one or a not-so-popular one. So, many of my questions about different works may seem obvious to most here but to me this is all new and slightly overwhelming. I appreciate your recommendations very much. I realize that I cannot purchase every recommendation at once, but I have started a list and I just add these recommendations to my list and will purchase them in the not-to-distant future. I promise to let you and everyone else know what I think once I have had a chance to give them a listen.

Thanks again.

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Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:44 pm

Hopefully, we'll get a second opinon on the Munch recording. I'm not that much further in this game than you are. For example, I generally own one maybe two recordings of most standard items in the repertoire. Occasionally, I'll go hog wild and buy multiple renditions of something I really like. But there are people here who can give you comparative evaluations of 20 or 30 renditions of a single composition.

You might also want to look into fanfare magazine. www.fanfaremag.com. Recommended to me by other forum members. Less sizzle and more steak than some of the classical magazines you'll find on the stands. And a subscription provides access to a complete database of every review they've ever run.

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debussy's piano preludes

Post by hangos » Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:48 pm

slofstra wrote:
Haydnseek wrote:
knotslip wrote:
Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998
I recently heard Claude Debussy's "Prelude a L'apres midi D'un faune" and I really loved it. Please excuse the spelling if it is not correct...I am very new to classical and have not learned French or Italian as of yet :-)

I was wondering if the 1998 recording you mention contains this work?

Thanks.
No, they are all pieces for piano solo but they include the famous "La fille aux cheveux de lin."
Have you heard Uchida's version. I wonder how you think it compares. Uchida's is on my list, although I've not heard Kocsis'.
Apparently Kocsis' recording of the Preludes falls far short of the rest of his recordings of Debussy (or anyone else) - full of agagic distortions (a musician will explain this,please?) and with little regard for Debussy's dynamic markings.I didn't know Uchida had recorded the preludes (her Etudes are stunning!) but you could try Martino Tirimo on IMP Classics or Regis at superbargain price for all 24 on one disc in a lovely recording, or Pascal Roge on Decca (London in USA?) You can't go far wrong with them. If sound quality is not a priority, you could get Walter Gieseking on a 2 CD EMI set fairly cheap - don't buy the full price version (same recording, different price) Gieseking is said by many to be the ultimate Debussy interpreter, and these date from the early 1950s.
Good hunting!
Martin

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Post by knotslip » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:25 pm

Thanks Slofstra and Martin.

Okay, this list is getting VERY large VERY fast. :shock:

I'll need a second job to help support my classical music habit :D

Thanks again!

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Re: debussy's piano preludes

Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:53 pm

hangos wrote:
slofstra wrote:
Haydnseek wrote:
knotslip wrote:
Zoltan Kocsis's recording of the Debussy Preludes - 1998
I recently heard Claude Debussy's "Prelude a L'apres midi D'un faune" and I really loved it. Please excuse the spelling if it is not correct...I am very new to classical and have not learned French or Italian as of yet :-)

I was wondering if the 1998 recording you mention contains this work?

Thanks.
No, they are all pieces for piano solo but they include the famous "La fille aux cheveux de lin."
Have you heard Uchida's version. I wonder how you think it compares. Uchida's is on my list, although I've not heard Kocsis'.
Apparently Kocsis' recording of the Preludes falls far short of the rest of his recordings of Debussy (or anyone else) - full of agagic distortions (a musician will explain this,please?) and with little regard for Debussy's dynamic markings.I didn't know Uchida had recorded the preludes (her Etudes are stunning!) but you could try Martino Tirimo on IMP Classics or Regis at superbargain price for all 24 on one disc in a lovely recording, or Pascal Roge on Decca (London in USA?) You can't go far wrong with them. If sound quality is not a priority, you could get Walter Gieseking on a 2 CD EMI set fairly cheap - don't buy the full price version (same recording, different price) Gieseking is said by many to be the ultimate Debussy interpreter, and these date from the early 1950s.
Good hunting!
Martin
Awk. It is the Etudes -thank you for catching me on that point. In fact, my list above references the Etudes, not the Preludes, as one of the best recordings of the last 10-15 years.

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Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:54 pm

knotslip wrote:Thanks Slofstra and Martin.

Okay, this list is getting VERY large VERY fast. :shock:

I'll need a second job to help support my classical music habit :D

Thanks again!
Here's a tip: once you have over 20-30 CDs still in shrinkwrap, stop buying and start listening. HS.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:59 pm

CharmNewton wrote:I'm surprised that more members aren't piping in with what they believe are truly great recordings made within the past 10 years.
Most of mine fall outside the 10 year mark. I went into a fog in 1998 and didn't come out until 2005. I have no idea really what was issued in the last 10 years.
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Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 3:08 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
CharmNewton wrote:I'm surprised that more members aren't piping in with what they believe are truly great recordings made within the past 10 years.
Most of mine fall outside the 10 year mark. I went into a fog in 1998 and didn't come out until 2005. I have no idea really what was issued in the last 10 years.
I'm not trying to twist anyone's arm for contributions, but you can go back to 1990.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Jul 15, 2007 4:08 pm

knotslip wrote:Thanks Slofstra and Martin.

Okay, this list is getting VERY large VERY fast. :shock:

I'll need a second job to help support my classical music habit :D

Thanks again!
That's why I work twelve hour days... :wink:

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Post by slofstra » Sun Jul 15, 2007 4:34 pm

Chalkperson wrote:
knotslip wrote:Thanks Slofstra and Martin.

Okay, this list is getting VERY large VERY fast. :shock:

I'll need a second job to help support my classical music habit :D

Thanks again!
That's why I work twelve hour days... :wink:
And post that prolifically? How do you do it? Wait - you post at work, right? Two hours work and 10 hours posting.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:58 pm

slofstra wrote:And post that prolifically? How do you do it? Wait - you post at work, right? Two hours work and 10 hours posting.
He's self-employed, so he should report himself to . . . . never mind.

One place I worked we were staffed up for litigation, then the Congress terminated the jurisdiction of the administrative board at which litigation required so many resources. What else was there to do but play on the internet? :twisted:
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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:04 pm

slofstra wrote:And post that prolifically? How do you do it? Wait - you post at work, right? Two hours work and 10 hours posting.
Strangely enough, the physical time I am actually doing something important is a fraction of the time taken by the people who work for me...on a daily basis, pre-surge, I have four guys taking pictures for ten hours straight, that's forty hours per day, bring in the other two guys and that's sixty hours of photography per day, that translates to about two hundred gigabytes of storage per week... and don't think I am afraid of large numbers, before going digital I used to spend $27,000 per month on Film and Processing, switching the entire studio over to Digital was around $700,000, a snip of a deal...my job is to watch Two Thirty Inch Wide Apple Monitors, on these I see, and can even control, in real time, the six cameras, I can see everything each camera is doing at all times, I don't leave my office any more, and it's fifteen years since I touched a camera, I even have a guy that does people for me, I just watch, make a digital comment to his screen and go back to CMG...of course the downside is that I can't leave, ever...the upside is that I can play up to twelve hours of music, of my own choosing, per day, that's why I have so many records, and also how I can post so prolifically...

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Post by slofstra » Mon Jul 16, 2007 5:30 pm

So I was right!

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Post by slofstra » Mon Jul 16, 2007 5:35 pm

CharmNewton wrote:I'm surprised that more members aren't piping in with what they believe are truly great recordings made within the past 10 years.

I was just thinking of the recording of Vivaldi's Four Seasons with Fabio Biondi and Europa Galante on Virgin. While I still love Mullova/Abbado on Philips (recorded about 20 years ago) because her contribution is so stunning, the Biondi is so fresh and so vivacious and different that it re-defines the work. If it were used as elevator music, I could picture a lot of folks riding up and down for a half-hour or so just not wanting to get off. :)

John
I think I have Ian Bostridge's Bach disc with Europa Galante on my list above.

But to answer your first question - a) it actually required more work than I thought it would, b) the forum members who know the most usually stop around 1970. Often they have reasons for doing so. I was trying to flush 'reblem' out for his (reasons I mean), but he didn't take the bait.

Perhaps I should have specifically asked for one to three great disks since 1990, less daunting.

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Post by Chalkperson » Mon Jul 16, 2007 10:46 pm

slofstra wrote:So I was right!
Yes, but there are mitigating circumstances, the studio is like a three ring circus, not for the fainthearted, but, my guys are used to me stopping the whole place to listen to part of a new CD and in the 'old' days I would run four blocks north to Tower during lunchtime, they have long given up the right to control the music, I work very hard and my reward is the music I buy and play...personally I think I have a great deal, with myself that is...

ps They don't like Wagner...it's OK, neither do I, unless i'm home sick... :lol:

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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Jul 16, 2007 11:04 pm

Chalkperson wrote:[hThey don't like Wagner...it's OK, neither do I, unless i'm home sick... :lol:
Wagner has been accused of many things, but never AFIK of being Welsh. :)

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Post by slofstra » Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:33 am

Chalkperson wrote:
slofstra wrote:So I was right!
Yes, but there are mitigating circumstances, the studio is like a three ring circus, not for the fainthearted, but, my guys are used to me stopping the whole place to listen to part of a new CD and in the 'old' days I would run four blocks north to Tower during lunchtime, they have long given up the right to control the music, I work very hard and my reward is the music I buy and play...personally I think I have a great deal, with myself that is...

ps They don't like Wagner...it's OK, neither do I, unless i'm home sick... :lol:
Actually, I confess this is a case of the stove calling the kettle black. I do most posting from my office, in between meetings, test runs, phone calls and what have you.
I also don't see the Wagner, homesick connection. Are they doing the Ring in Llanfairpwllgwyngychgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch?

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:42 am

slofstra wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:[quote="slofstra;]So I was right!
Yes, but there are mitigating circumstances, the studio is like a three ring circus, not for the fainthearted, but, my guys are used to me stopping the whole place to listen to part of a new CD and in the 'old' days I would run four blocks north to Tower during lunchtime, they have long given up the right to control the music, I work very hard and my reward is the music I buy and play...personally I think I have a great deal, with myself that is...

ps They don't like Wagner...it's OK, neither do I, unless i'm home sick... :lol:
Actually, I confess this is a case of the stove calling the kettle black. I do most posting from my office, in between meetings, test runs, phone calls and what have you.
]I also don't see the Wagner, homesick connection. Are they doing the Ring in Llanfairpwllgwyngychgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch?
Sorry, now I know what you and John are on about! what I meant was when I am at home due to illness, I was 'sick' earlier this year, unable to get out of bed so I listened to Keilberth's Ring...

as for 'homesick' i've spent only nine days in the UK since 1988...
Last edited by Chalkperson on Tue Jul 17, 2007 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by slofstra » Tue Jul 17, 2007 12:53 pm

Oh you were home, sick not homesick. Eats shoots and leaves.

Incidentally, Wagner + Wales = Terfel. I'm not a fan of Terfel, incidentally. He sings on one rendition of Dona Nobis Pacem, and totally screws it up.
Last edited by slofstra on Tue Jul 17, 2007 1:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by RebLem » Tue Jul 17, 2007 1:18 pm

hangos wrote:
RebLem wrote:I disagree with most of the above.

I have just a few recommendations off-hand--

1. The Barshai set of the Shostakovich symphonies on Brilliant.
2. The St Petersburg Quartet's set of the Shostakovich string quartets plus the Piano Quintet and the Piano Trio 2 on hyperion.
I would definitely endorse the Barshai set - I have never heard a 4th Symphony performance to match it! I haven't heard the St.Petersburg - are they as good as the Shostakovich Quartet (reissued on Regis at superbargain price in the last few years, so does it count? :D )
I don't know. I have the Shostakovich Quartet set, but haven't listened to it yet. I have hundreds of CDs I haven't listened to yet; I do keep track of them; they don't go on my regular shelves until I have listened to them. I have vowed to refrain from buying new CDs until I have listened to all of them, which means I probably won't be buying CDs at all for at least the next year. I am accummulating a wants list, though, and the Beethoven Quartet set of the Shostakovich quartets is on it.

One other that fully and unresevedly qualifies for the list, however, is one that so far I have only listened to half of--the Serebrier NAXOS 2 CD set of The Golden Age, sometimes called The Age of Gold by Shostakovich. This is the first complete recording of the original ballet score from 1930 and it has some magnificent music that is not in the suite, and it was recorded just last year in 2006. For some strange reason, the Soviet critics didn't like it, but the story line is really down the line Communist agitprop boilerplate. Despite that, it is magnificent, lively music. You will never hear Shostakovich more bubbly and ebullient, cheerful, and exciting. Yes, I did say cheerful. I mean it!
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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Jul 17, 2007 2:02 pm

RebLem wrote: I am accummulating a wants list, though, and the Beethoven Quartet set of the Shostakovich quartets is on it.
It is a wonderful set, just blows all other readings out of the water...
One other that fully and unresevedly qualifies for the list, however, is one that so far I have only listened to half of--the Serebrier NAXOS 2 CD set of The Golden Age, sometimes called The Age of Gold by Shostakovich. You will never hear Shostakovich more bubbly and ebullient, cheerful, and exciting. Yes, I did say cheerful. I mean it!
Another excellent choice...

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Post by slofstra » Tue Jul 17, 2007 2:45 pm

Perhaps I've been out of line in recommending the Emerson, do you think? It was on my (B with an asterisk) list, along with Tafelmusik's Mozart # 40. Both are recent releases that I'm really enjoying a lot, but I don't know whether they'll stand up. How do you feel the Emerson set stacks up? (After also purchasing an Ives recording by them, I'm lately somewhat enamoured of their playing).

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