The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

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CharmNewton
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:10 pm

The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by CharmNewton » Tue Jun 15, 2021 11:33 pm

Eloquence has released Rafael Kubelik's complete recordings for Mercury and Decca from the early to late 1950s. The Mercury box will fill a hole for those who want his recordings with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. They are all here and as a bonus the collection includes some experimental stereo recordings made by Bert Whyte in 1952 during the Mercury sessions in Orchestra Hall. This disc has excerpts from Smetana's Ma Vlast, Mozart's Symphony No. 38 and Bloch's wonderful Concerto Grosso No. 1. It doesn't appear that any of these recordings survive complete, but what we have of the Mozart and Bloch is substantial.

The Decca box includes a number of recordings made with the Vienna Philharmonic, including Ma Vlast, a Brahms cycle and a Mahler Symphony No. 1, which have been overlooked for re-issue on CD for many years but were mainstays of London's Stereo Treasury Series catalog for many years.

Hats off to Eloquence for compiling these collections. Have to love the spirit and spunk of those Aussies. And who knows, perhaps more stereo material will turn up one day from the Chicago recordings. I used to read Bert Whyte's column in Audio Magazine more than 30 years ago and I remember him writing about making these stereo recordings in Chicago and here they finally are.

John

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maestrob
Posts: 11693
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by maestrob » Wed Jun 16, 2021 8:12 am

That's truly a magnificent addition to the catalogue. Many thanks, Charmnewton, for the alert! 😉

Mind posting a source for this? Can't seem to find it here on Amazon or Presto.

barney
Posts: 5867
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:12 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by barney » Wed Jun 16, 2021 8:22 am

Kubelik Decca


CDs 1–2
JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833–1897)
Symphonies Nos. 1–4
Wiener Philharmoniker

CD 3
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841–1904)
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104
Pierre Fournier, cello; Wiener Philharmoniker
Serenade for Strings in E major Op. 22
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

CD 4
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841–1904)
Symphonies Nos. 7 & 9
Wiener Philharmoniker

CD 5
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841–1904)
Slavonic Dances, Opp. 46 & 72
Wiener Philharmoniker

CD 6
BEDŘICH SMETANA (1824–1884)
Má vlast
Wiener Philharmoniker

CD 7
GUSTAV MAHLER (1860–1911)
Symphony No. 1 in D major
Wiener Philharmoniker
FIRST INTERNATIONAL CD RELEASE ON DECCA

CD 8
LEOŠ JANÁČEK (1854–1928)
Sinfonietta
PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840–1893)
Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy-Overture after Shakespeare
Wiener Philharmoniker

CDs 9–10
OTTO NICOLAI (1810–1849)
Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor
Sir John Falstaff……………………………………………………………………………………………..…Karl Ridderbusch
Fluth / Ford…………………………………………………………..……………………..…………………Wolfgang Brendel
Herr Reich / Page………………………………………….……………………..……………………………Alexander Malta
Frau Fluth / Mistress Ford…………………………….………………..……………………………………..Helen Donath
Frau Reich / Mistress Page…………………………………………………………..……………….Trudeliese Schmidt
Fenton………………………………………………………………………..…..………………………..Claes Haakon Ahnsjö
Junker Spärlich / Slender………………………………………………….….…………………………………Heinz Zednik
Dr. Cajus………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………….Alfred Sramek
Jungfer Anna Reich / Anna Page…………………………..…………………………………………………..Lilian Sukis
Chor und Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

CDs 11–12
CARL MARIA VON WEBER (1786–1826)
Der Freischütz, Op. 77, J. 277
Ottokar…………………………………………………………………………………………..………………Wolfgang Brendel
Kuno……………………………………………………………………………….….……………………….Raimund Grumbach
Agathe.………………………………………………………………………………………..……………..…Hildegard Behrens
Ännchen………………………………………………………………….………………………..…………………..Helen Donath
Kaspar……………………………………………………………….………………..………………………………….Peter Meven
Max………………………………………………………………………………….……..……………………..………….René Kollo
Ein Eremit…………………………………………………………..…..……………………………………………………Kurt Moll
Samiel………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………….Rolf Boysen
Kilian……………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………..Hermann Sapell
Jäger………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………Theodor Nicolai
Bridesmaids………………………Irmgart Lampart, Adelheid Schiller, Erika Ruggeberg, Renate Freyer
Chor und Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

HECTOR BERLIOZ (1803–1869)
Ah ! Ah ! Je vais mourir ! … Adieu, fière cité (Les Troyens)
Josephine Veasey, mezzo-soprano; Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden

RAFAEL KUBELÍK


BACKGROUND
Rafael Kubelik, the Czech conductor, was in every way a big man: tall and robust in physique, he was the most generous of human beings and he inspired devoted affection among his friends and colleagues. This complete Decca collection finds Kubelík working with the Wiener Philharmoniker, the Israel Philharmonic, the Symphony Orchestra of the Bavarian Radio, and for a single operatic extract, the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ORIGINAL JACKETS LIMITED EDITION.

Rafael Kubelík had made his debut with the Vienna Philharmonic at the 1950 Salzburg Festival, and together they made a series of recordings during the late 1950s which have long been prized for their warmth and spontaneous-sounding expression. The Mahler First introduced countless listeners to the composer for the first time, as did the Janáček Sinfonietta. After the spectacular success of Kubelík’s first Má Vlast recording, made in Chicago, the Vienna remake is softer edged but no less scored with the nationalistic fervour and colour that made the conductor synonymous with the piece until his death in 1996. Cast in the same mould as the Smetana are the Brahms symphonies and Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet.

In fact few other label-focused anthologies of Kubelík’s recordings survey so wide a span: a quarter of a century from the Dvořák Cello Concerto with Pierre Fournier in 1954 to the 1979 recording of Der Freischütz, Weber’s foundational work of German Romantic opera, strongly cast in the Decca tradition and led by the radiantly sung Agathe of Hildegard Behrens, then at the start of a career that would soon establish her as the leading Wagnerian soprano of her generation. In this Bavarian Radio appendix to his Decca career, Kubelík made a no less attractive recording of Nicolai’s Merry Wives of Windsor, likewise transferring the atmosphere of the stage into the studio with the experience of decades behind him.

Towards the end of Kubelík’s Vienna years with Decca, he also performed and recorded in Israel. The Decca sessions in a cinema outside Tel Aviv yielded an account of Dvořák’s Serenade for Strings in which critics had no trouble hearing the authentic voice of the Czech nation in exile, embodied in the figure of Kubelík for half a century.

The booklet includes a full contextual account by Peter Quantrill of Kubelík’s Decca career.

“A first-class version, which may be highly recommended… The recording is brilliant, with a richness equal to Decca’s best.” Gramophone, March 1955 (Dvořák: Cello Concerto)

“Kubelík gets an extremely good performance from the Vienna Philharmonic, and conductor, players and Decca engineers have seen to it that the colours and lines are kept sharp, bright and clear. Every instrument sounds quintessentially itself.” Gramophone, February 1956 (Janáček)

“Kubelík turns in a relaxed, free-flowing reading and he is seconded by superb string playing and sumptuous recorded sound.” Stereo Review, March 1958 (Dvořák: Serenade for Strings)

“An old-fashioned, relaxed performance … There may be more exciting Brahms Thirds on disc, but it is doubtful whether any of them are more genuinely satisfying.” High Fidelity, March 1959 (Brahms, Symphony No. 3)
“Kubelík feels this music deeply. His interpretation is vibrant and exciting. The orchestra plays beautifully and the tone it produces is elegant and rich. London's stereo offers an envelopment of sound that is simply luxurious.’ Stereo Review, January 1960 (Smetana, Má Vlast)

“A beautifully warm, sane performance from beginning to end… the Vienna Philharmonic is in its best form.” High Fidelity, August 1960 (Brahms, Symphony No. 4)

“Kubelík avoids Kleiber’s tendency to over-emphasise detail … [he] also has the slightly stronger, more consistent cast. Behrens is the most convincing Agathe.” Opera, February 1981 (Weber, Der Freischütz)

RECORDING INFORMATION
CD 1
Recording Producers: John Culshaw, Erik Smith (Symphony No. 1); John Culshaw (Symphony No. 2)
Balance Engineers: Gordon Parry; James Brown
Recording Location: Sofiensaal, Vienna, Austria, 23–24 September 1957 (Symphony No. 1), 4–8 March 1957 (Symphony No. 2)
Original Decca Releases: LXT 5417: June 1958, SXL 2013: September 1958 (Symphony No. 1); LXT 5339: December 1957, SXL 2059: January 1959 (Symphony No. 2)

CD 2
Recording Producers: John Culshaw; Erik Smith (Symphony No. 3); Victor Olof, Peter Andry (Symphony No. 4)
Balance Engineers: Gordon Parry; James Brown (Symphony No. 3); Cyril Windebank, James Brown (Symphony No. 4)
Recording Location: Sofiensaal, Vienna, Austria, 28–29 September 1957 (Symphony No. 3), 24–25 March 1956 (Symphony No. 4)
Original Decca Releases: LXT 5419: April 1958, SXL 2104: March 1959 (Symphony No. 3); LXT 5214: October 1956, SXL 2206: June 1960 (Symphony No. 4)

CD 3
Recording Producers: Victor Olof (Cello Concerto); John Culshaw, James Walker (Serenade)
Balance Engineers: Cyril Windebank (Cello Concerto); Gordon Parry, James Brown (Serenade)
Recording Locations: Grosser Saal, Musikverein, Vienna, Austria, 26 June 1954 (Cello Concerto);
Tifferet Cinema, Rishon-le-Zion, Israel, April 1957 (Serenade)
Original Decca Releases: LXT 2999: January 1955 (Cello Concerto); LW 5332 [mono]: May 1958, SPA 375 [stereo]: March 1975 (Serenade)

CD 4
Recording Producer: John Culshaw
Balance Engineers: Gordon Parry, James Brown
Recording Location: Sofiensaal, Vienna, Austria, 1–4 October 1956
Original Decca Releases: LXT 5290: March 1957 (Symphony No. 7); LXT 5291: February 1957, SXL 2005: August 1958 (Symphony No. 9)

CD 5
Recording Producers: Victor Olof, Peter Andry
Balance Engineer: Cyril Windebank
Recording Location: Grosser Saal, Musikverein, Vienna, Austria, 7 & 10–11 March 1955
Original Decca Release: LXT 5079–80: September 1955

CD 6
Recording Producers: John Culshaw, Erik Smith
Balance Engineers: Gordon Parry, James Brown
Recording Location: Sofiensaal, Vienna, Austria, 3–7 April 1958
Original Decca Release: LXT 5474–75, SXL 2064–65: June 1959

CD 7
Recording Producer: James Walker
Balance Engineer: Cyril Windebank
Recording Location: Grosser Saal, Musikverein, Vienna, Austria, 27 June 1954
Original Decca Release: LXT 2973: October 1954

CD 8
Recording Producers: Victor Olof, Peter Andry
Balance Engineer: Cyril Windebank
Recording Location: Grosser Saal, Musikverein, Vienna, Austria, 8–9 March 1955 (Janáček), 2–3 March 1955 (Tchaikovsky)
Original Decca Releases: LW 5213: December 1955, LD 9223: November 1956 (Janáček);
LXT 5079–80: September 1955, LL1283–84: February 1956 (Tchaikovsky)

CDs 9–10
Recording Producer: Ray Minshull
Balance Engineers: James Lock, Martin Fouqué
Recording Location: Herkulessaal, Munich, Germany, 8–28 March 1977
Original Decca Release: D86D3: March 1978

CD 11, CD 12 (Tracks 1-13)
Recording Producers: Tom Mowrey, Michael Haas
Assistant Producer: Morten Winding
Balance Engineers: Stanley Goodall, Simon Eadon, Martin Atkinson
Recording Location: Herkulessaal, Munich, Germany, 5–17 November 1979
Original Decca Release: D235D3: December 1980

CD 12 (Track 13)
Recording Producer: Christopher Raeburn
Balance Engineers: James Lock; Stanley Goodall
Recording Location: Kingsway Hall, London, UK, February 1968
Original Decca Release: MET 392–93: November 1968, SET 392–393: March 1969






RELEASE DATE 28 May 2021
ARTIST Rafael Kubelík
TITLE Rafael Kubelík - The Mercury Masters
LABEL Mercury Living Presence/Eloquence GENRE Classical
FORMAT 10-CD WEBSITE https://eloquenceclassics.com

CAT# 4843028 BARCODE 00028948430284
PRICE CODE PPD DIST COST
G107 $43.00 $1.00 $48.40
TRACK LISTING





AUDIOVISUAL TRAILER HERE:
https://youtu.be/m7BA3mewedM




CD 1
MODEST MUSSORGSKY (1839–1881)
Orchestrated by Maurice Ravel (1875–1937)
Pictures at an Exhibition

CD 2
BÉLA BARTÓK (1881–1945)
Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Sz. 106
Irwin Fischer, celesta
Edward Metzenger, timpani
Allen Graham, Lionel Sayers, Thomas Glenecke, percussion

ERNEST BLOCH (1880–1959)
Concerto Grosso for String Orchestra with Piano Obbligato*
George Schick, piano
*FIRST INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ON CD

CD 3
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841–1904)
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 ‘From the New World’

CD 4
PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840–1893)
Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36
FIRST INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ON CD

CD 5
PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840–1893)
Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 ‘Pathétique’
FIRST INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ON CD

CD 6
JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833–1897)
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68
FIRST INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ON CD

CD 7
BEDŘICH SMETANA (1824–1884)
Má vlast

CD 8
WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756–1791)
Symphony No. 38 in D major, KV 504 ‘Prague’
Symphony No. 34 in C major, KV 338*
*FIRST INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ON CD

CD 9
PAUL HINDEMITH (1895–1963)
Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes by Carl Maria von Weber
ARNOLD SCHOENBERG (1874–1951)
Fünf Orchesterstücke, Op. 16

CD 10
PERSPECTIVE, THE FIRST REEL AND EXPERIMENTAL STEREO
Interview with Wilma Cozart Fine (Interviewer: Sedgwick Clark)

ERNEST BLOCH (1880–1959)
Concerto Grosso - First reel of tape, 23 April 1951*
PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED

BERT WHYTE – THE EXPERIMENTAL STEREO RECORDINGS
BEDŘICH SMETANA (1824–1884)
Tábor (Má vlast) – stereo*

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756–1791)
Symphony No. 38 in D major, KV 504 ‘Prague’ – excerpts (stereo)*
*FIRST RELEASE ON MERCURY LIVING PRESENCE

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
RAFAEL KUBELÍK


BACKGROUND
Groundbreaking technology, dynamic musical leadership, world-class orchestral playing: a brief marriage of lasting impact for the history of recorded music. To mark the 70th anniversary of Mercury Living Presence, this limited-edition box presents the complete Chicago Symphony/Rafael Kubelík recordings, newly remastered by Thomas Fine and including never-before-published material.

• Original cover albums
• New booklet essay on the Chicago Symphony/Kubelík years by Jonathan Woolf
• A ‘sessionography’ by Thomas Fine
• Booklet includes rare photographs from the Mercury archives

The brief and turbulent tenure of Rafael Kubelík as the CSO’s music director has become the stuff of legend for its intense partisan hostility. When he arrived in Chicago in 1950 to replace Artur Rodzinski, the 36-year-old Kubelík had impressive credentials and a fast-growing list of triumphs in Europe. The city’s musical press had hung previous directors out to dry, including Rodzinski, but they subjected Kubelík to intense and sustained criticism of his programming and performances until he resigned in 1953.

Kubelík’s arrival coincided with the lapsing of the CSO’s previous recording contract and the almost immediate appearance of the ambitious Mercury label. The conductor later recalled how ‘a very clever team from Mercury turned up and established that the best microphone positioning was just a single one above my head … the resulting sound was identical to what I heard during the playing and didn’t need to be altered’.

As soon as they were issued – Pictures at an Exhibition was the first LP ever released by Mercury – the results won universal praise. Another eight albums followed, of Romantic and modern repertoire playing to the strengths of both orchestra and conductor, concluding in April 1953 with a sonic and artistic spectacular, the Five Pieces for Orchestra of Schoenberg coupled with Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphoses on themes of Weber.

Using the best original tape sources available, new high-resolution transfers have been made by Thomas Fine, son of C. Robert Fine and Wilma Cozart Fine, founders of Mercury. Thomas Fine has also contributed ‘sessionography’ notes, detailing the equipment and techniques which made MLP recordings famous the world over for their unparalleled fidelity.

CD10 includes unique material, beginning with an interview with Wilma Cozart Fine. First takes of Bloch’s Concerto Grosso add up to an almost complete alternative performance, never previously published. Experimental-stereo tapes – of Mozart’s ‘Prague’ Symphony and Tabor from Ma Vlast – were made by the engineer Bert Whyte. Both are included here in new remasters by Mark Obert-Thorn.

“One of the most startling successes of the early years of LP recording… The result is remarkable for the undistorted opulence and realism of the sound.” The Record Guide, 1955 (Mussorgsky/Ravel)

“Mercury has exceeded itself… and the orchestra sounds like a real virtuoso group under Kubelík’s propulsive baton.” Gramophone, January 1952 (Bartók/Bloch)

“So sensational that one needs a bucketful of adjectives to describe it.” Gramophone, October 1952 (Mussorgsky/Ravel)

“A very distinguished account… which quite outclasses previous recordings.” Gramophone, February 1953 (Dvořák)

“Now the crown for the hiest-fiest, most startlingly realistic recording must go to this remarkable disc – which is, moreover, equally remarkable for the brilliance of the performances… Definitely my Record of the Year.” Gramophone, September 1955 (Hindemith/Schoenberg)

“Both works are presented with masterly certainty of touch.” The Times, October 1955 (Hindemith/Schoenberg)

“Forceful, sometimes hard-driven but decidedly attractive performances, finely recorded.” The Times, December 1955 (Mozart)

“The Chicago Symphony Orchestra recordings from 1951 through 1953, in their single aural perspective of the orchestra, represent an occasion on which the recording of the symphony orchestra reached true artistry.” High Fidelity, March 1973

“The performance has qualities Kubelík has never surpassed. This is probably the most deeply felt Ma Vlast we have… the only one that anyone will have any interest in hearing 25 years from now.” High Fidelity, July 1976 (Smetana)

RECORDING INFORMATION
CD 1
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineers: C. Robert Fine, George Piros
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 23–24 April 1951
Recording Specifications: Neumann U-47 microphone, telephone line patch to Universal Recording, Ampex 300 tape recorder
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Jared Hawkes (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50000: October 1951

CD 2
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineers: C. Robert Fine, George Piros
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 23–24 April 1951
Recording Specifications: Neumann U-47 microphone, telephone line patch to Universal Recording, Ampex 300 tape recorder
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Jared Hawkes (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50001: October 1951

CD 3
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineers: C. Robert Fine, George Piros
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, November 19–20, 1951
Recording Specifications: U-47 mic, Ampex 300 tape recorder
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Craig Thompson (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50002: February 1952

CD 4
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineers: C. Robert Fine, George Piros
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, November 19–20, 1951
Recording Specifications: U-47 mic, Ampex 300 tape recorder)
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Craig Thompson (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50003: February 1952

CD 5
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineer: C. Robert Fine
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 21–22 April 1952
Recording Specifications: U-47 mic, recording truck with Fairchild tape recorder
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50006: September 1952

CD 6
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineer: C. Robert Fine
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 21–22 April 1952
Recording specifications: U-47 mic, recording truck with Fairchild tape recorder
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50007: September 1952

CD 7
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineer: C. Robert Fine
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 4–6 December 1952
Recording Specifications: U-47 mic, recording truck, Fairchild tape recorder
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Jared Hawkes (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: OL-2-100 / MG 50013–14: January 1953

CD 8
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineer: C. Robert Fine
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 4–6 December 1952 (Symphony No. 34); USA, 3–5 April 1953 (Symphony No. 38)
Recording Specifications: U-47 mic, recording truck, Fairchild tape recorder (Symphony No. 34); Schoeps M201 microphone, recording truck, Fairchild tape recorder (Symphony No. 38)
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Jared Hawkes (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50015: September 1953

CD 9
Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineer: C. Robert Fine
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 3–5 April 1953
Recording Specifications: Schoeps M201 mic, recording truck, Fairchild tape recorder
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Jared Hawkes (Abbey Road Studios)
Remastering Engineer: Thomas Fine
Original Mercury Release: MG 50024: September 1955

CD 10
Mercury Recording Producer: Wilma Cozart
Mercury Recording Supervisor: David Hall
Recording Engineers: John Quinn (interview); C. Robert Fine (Bloch); Bert Whyte (Smetana, Mozart)
Recording Location: Orchestra Hall, Chicago, USA, 23 April 1951 (Bloch); 6 December 1952 (Smetana); 3 April 1953 (Mozart), The Mix Place, New York, USA, 1996 (interview)
Tape to Digital Transfer Engineer: Thomas Fine (Bloch); Mark Obert-Thorn (Smetana, Mozart)
Remastering Engineers: Thomas Fine; Mark Obert-Thorn

maestrob
Posts: 11693
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by maestrob » Wed Jun 16, 2021 12:33 pm

Wow!

Many thanks, Barney, for such complete and in-depth information. I'm heading to the website right now!

Lance
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Location: Binghamton, New York
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Re: The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by Lance » Wed Jun 16, 2021 3:36 pm

I have a huge number of Rafael Kubelik's recordings on EMI, DGG, Sony Classical, a few Deccas, some on Testament and a few of those issued individually on Mercury. I've already ordered the Mercury/Chicago recordings. I did NOT order the Decca Eloquence box, but Universal apparently did not include any from the DGG catalogue, only original Deccas. Inasmuch as the Chicago Symphony Orchestra has always been one of my favourite orchestras, I could not resist. Now I am thinking I should acquire the Decca Eloquence box as well. Yes or no? I already have 170 listings on commercial and private entries where Kubelik's name is listed ... that's not the number of CDs, which is near staggering. This is all becoming too much for one man who is addicted to great recordings. But then how much can one man hear over a lifetime?
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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CharmNewton
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:10 pm

Re: The Kubelik Mercury and Decca Recordings

Post by CharmNewton » Wed Jun 16, 2021 10:06 pm

maestrob wrote:
Wed Jun 16, 2021 8:12 am
That's truly a magnificent addition to the catalogue. Many thanks, Charmnewton, for the alert! 😉

Mind posting a source for this? Can't seem to find it here on Amazon or Presto.
I ordered both sets from ImportCDs. :D Final cost was $96.26, including shipping. Both items were in stock and shipped today. I'm pretty excited about the CSO box, but I'm looking forward to his Vienna Brahms cycle too. I believe it is his only commercial Brahms cycle, although he may have recorded all the symphonies spread among several labels (starting with the Chicago Brahms 1st). I have a somewhat worn LP of the Bloch Concerto Grosso which I play several times a year. It will be great to hear it on CD.

John

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